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Midday is WYPR's daily public affairs program heard from noon-1pm, Monday-Friday.  Topics range from the latest news, to local and national politics.

WYPR News

Mary Rose Madden

Camden County Officer Tyrrell Bagby is headed to his usual beat, but on the way he sees a man stumbling, about to walk off the curb and into a busy intersection near City Hall.  Officer Bagby leans out the window and tells the man the train is coming and that he could be hurt “sitting in the middle of the street.”

P. Kenneth Burns

As you’d expect, Lt. Gene Ryan was a satisfied man Monday when Lt. Brian Rice was acquitted of all charges in Freddie Gray’s death.

Ryan, the head of Baltimore’s police union, has been among the most vocal critics of the charges filed against six police officers in the case and of State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby.  And some of that criticism has been inflammatory.

The case of the missing Chesapeake Bay blue crabs

Jul 21, 2016
Pamela D'Angelo

  Over the years, scientists have learned more about the Atlantic blue crab than just about any other species in the Chesapeake Bay. But there’s at least one mystery that still has them stumped. What happened to the millions of young crabs that vanished in 2012, what should have been a bumper year?

GLAAD

Sonja Santelises, Baltimore schools CEO, recently appointed DeRay Mckesson, a Baltimore native and leader in the Black Lives Matter movement, to be the city schools interim chief of human capital. As an educator and an activist, Mckesson brings a unique set of experiences to his new position. 

    

Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, take up the latest developments in the Freddie Gray case and what it may mean for future prosecutions.

More News

CAPBA and PRNDI Awards

On The Watch

Mary Rose Madden

On the Watch, Part 9: What does Camden, New Jersey have that Baltimore doesn't?

Camden County Officer Tyrrell Bagby is headed to his usual beat, but on the way he sees a man stumbling, about to walk off the curb and into a busy intersection near City Hall. Officer Bagby leans out the window and tells the man the train is coming and that he could be hurt “sitting in the middle of the street.”
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Out of the Blocks

all photos by Wendel Patrick

2100 E Monument

The 2100 block of Monument Street is anchored by the Baltimore’s Northeast Market, a honeycomb of vendors selling fish, meat, fried chicken, barbeque, bulgogi, deli sandwiches, and baked goods.
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WYPR and NPR News

Thank you so much. You know, it's hard to believe that it has been eight years since I first came to this convention to talk with you about why I thought my husband should be President. Remember how I told you about his character and conviction, his decency and his grace — the traits that we've seen every day that he's served our country in the White House.

From the get-go, Michelle Obama was the reluctant political spouse.

She was apparently "not thrilled from the very beginning about Barack Obama's political career," going back to when he was an Illinois state senator, according to Peter Slevin, the author of a biography about Michelle Obama.

Tim LaHaye, evangelical pastor and co-author of the best-selling Left Behind novels, has died at the age of 90.

LaHaye was a prominent Christian leader, a successful megachurch pastor, the author of scores of nonfiction books and the founder of The Institute for Creation Research as well as several schools.

But he is best-known for Left Behind, the wildly popular series of novels imagining Jesus' return to Earth in the modern era. LaHaye conceived the idea for the series, which he co-wrote with novelist Jerry B. Jenkins.

Michael Jordan is condemning violence against both African-Americans and police. His forceful and emotional statement, released by ESPN's The Undefeated, is a marked change for the NBA legend.

Jordan has been famously apolitical during his career – first as a Hall of Fame basketball player for the Chicago Bulls and more recently as an owner of the Charlotte Hornets – avoiding public statements on politics and civil rights, when other athletes have spoken out.

First Lady Michelle Obama came on stage to the roar of the crowd during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Obama extolled the virtues of the United States and without naming him, she made the case against GOP nominee Donald Trump.

And then she declared that she was "with her."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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