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Police Commissioner Davis fired, his deputy commissioner Daryll DeSousa hired

Mayor says she's "grown impatient" with crime numbers

WYPR News

Rachel Baye

Gov. Larry Hogan is again pushing for Maryland to change how it draws legislative districts.

For the third consecutive year, Hogan is introducing a bill that creates what he says would be a nonpartisan commission to draw the districts, he announced Thursday

For the last two years, Hogan’s redistricting bill has died in committee. Democrats say they don’t want Maryland to give up Democratic seats in Congress without other states giving up Republican seats.

Rachel Baye

Gov. Larry Hogan’s proposed $17.7 billion operating budget for next fiscal year, released Wednesday, cuts funding for several Democratic priorities.

Rachel Baye

Because of the way Maryland’s tax laws are written, recent changes in federal tax law could lead to sharp increases in state taxpayers’ bills. The governor and leaders of the state legislature all say they plan to look for a way to cushion that blow, and the Democrats in the legislature revealed at a press conference Tuesday how they plan to do that.

AP Photo/David Goldman

January 15, Martin Luther King’s birthday, and, for this year, the day America pays homage to his memory with a national holiday, may not seem like a day to think about sports.

But while the civil rights icon wasn’t an athlete – save for a 1964 photo of him throwing a baseball in the backyard to his son, Marty – King knew the value of sports as an agent for social change.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

America’s fresh water is getting saltier, and has been over the last 50 years. That’s according to new research from the University of Maryland.

You’ve seen those big trucks driving around dumping salt on the roads. University of Maryland scientists say that is just one of the reasons that in the continental U.S. freshwater has become 32 percent more salty, and 90 percent more acidic.

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WYPR Trivia Night

Do you train all week for Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me! and Ask Me Another? Then come test your knowledge of public radio-themed trivia at Cypriana on Jan 23 @ 6pm

Out of the Blocks

all photos by Wendel Patrick

100 S Broadway, part 1

Baltimore became a second home to members of North Carolina’s Lumbee tribe when they immigrated to the city after World War II, trading in farm work for factory and construction jobs. Since then, the Baltimore American Indian Center on the 100 block of S Broadway has been a cultural hub for the transplanted Lumbee people and other Native Americans in the city. In this episode: Conversations with Urban Indians about family, spirituality, and identity.

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WYPR AND NPR NEWS

It has been called a "criminal cabal" rife with corruption. It's been said that its leaders need to be taken out in "handcuffs." And its reputation, one high-placed official has charged, is "in tatters."

The FBI has come under criticism before, but the ongoing barrage of allegations has left its current and former officials shaken. It also has fueled concerns that the bureau's reputation with the public could begin to crumble.

Maybe you got one of those find-your-ancestry kits over the holidays. You've sent off your awkwardly-collected saliva sample and now you're awaiting your results. If your experience is anything like that of me and my mom, you may find surprises — not the dramatic "switched at birth," but results that are really different than you expected.

The idea that each of us has a unique nutrition blueprint within our genes is a delicious concept.

Perhaps, this helps explain the growth in personalized nutrition testing and services such as Habit, Profile Precise and Nutrigenomix.

So, what exactly can these tests tell you?

When Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg began her legal crusade, women were treated differently than men by law. By the time she first put on judicial robes she had already worked a judicial revolution.

Today the issues are both the same and different. At front and center is the question of sexual harassment.

Hundreds of thousands of federal employees will either be sent home or told to not show up to work at all Monday as furloughs due to the government shutdown that began Friday night begin to affect workers around the country.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gave a foreboding warning from the Senate floor on Sunday.

"The shutdown is going to get a lot worse tomorrow," he warned. "A lot worse."

A new NPR/Marist poll finds that 1 in 5 jobs in America is made up of workers under contract. Within a decade, contractors and freelancers could make up half of the American workforce. Workers across all industries and at all professional levels will be touched by the movement toward independent work — one without the constraints, or benefits, of full-time employment. Policymakers are just starting to talk about the implications.

It is a sign of the times: Tokyo has conducted its first public drill to prepare for the possibility of a missile attack from North Korea.

At the Tokyo Dome amusement park, rides came to a halt as the public address system blared an ominous warning: "An advisory about a missile launch was just issued. Everyone, please stay calm and seek shelter in the basement. Those who are already indoors, please stay there."

The partial shutdown of the federal government has stretched into a third day, as discussions continue on a funding and immigration plan.

Lawmakers said Sunday they made progress on an agreement to end the shutdown, but did not reach a final deal. Senate leaders scheduled a procedural vote for noon on Monday on a bill to reopen the government and extend funding through Feb. 8.

Ask Republicans about Democrats, or vice versa, and sooner or later you will hear: "They're out of touch with the American people."

That statement was part of the soundtrack on Capitol Hill over the first weekend of the shutdown, repeated so often that one ceases to hear it.

It's an all-purpose way of condemning the hated "other" party. And it conveys the assumption that whoever is speaking is NOT out of touch with the American people.

Saturday saw protesters take to the streets from New York to Los Angeles — from Nigeria to Iraq. Various incarnations of the second annual Women's March demanded social change, promoted female empowerment and declared a resistance to President Trump on the anniversary of his inauguration.

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