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Immigrant families making Highlandtown boom

“To the extent that Baltimore is growing their population and tax base, refugees have really helped the city rebuild.”

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Katie Peikes/Delaware Public Media

Coastal states throughout the nation have come to depend on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sea Grant programs for research and education on issues ranging from storm damage, erosion and sea level rise to aquaculture.

But those 33, university based programs face an uncertain under President Trump’s budget proposal, which would cut the entire sea grant program.

Governor's Office

The buzzword at the first-ever state business summit Thursday morning was “customer service.”

The phrase was a key component of the sales pitch Gov. Larry Hogan and state Commerce Secretary R. Michael Gill made to the hundreds of business and other community leaders who paid to attend the day-long conference in Baltimore.

Baltimore City 2018 FY Budget

 

Parents, administrators, and community activists made their case to city council last night for additional funds for youth, after-school, and additional educational opportunities.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

   

Tucked into a corner off Eastern Avenue in Highlandtown, there are Latino-owned restaurants, blacked-owned barbershops, and one small grocery store owned by an immigrant-Nepalese family that opened in 2013.

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Out of the Blocks

all images by Wendel Patrick

2100 Edmondson

The corner diner, Soul Source, is the hub of the 2100 block of Edmondson Avenue. The manager, Joyce, has been serving breakfast to the locals for 30 years. Her restaurant looks out onto a West Baltimore block scarred by gunshots and stabbings. But the block is more than its scars. It’s a block where a Pentecostal pastor keeps her faith in the face of suffering, where a reformed drug dealer works as a kitchen appliance repairman, and where a political reporter from Kashmir has found sanctuary working behind the counter at a sandwich shop. It’s a block where a former Nigerian soccer star operates an auto repair shop. In his car lot, he lets a homeless man sleep in a van. Next door is an army veteran who issued air-strikes in Iraq and Afghanistan. And across the street is a tire repairman who’s trying to beat a 30-year heroin addiction. Crystal, who works in the kitchen at Soul Source, sums it up like this: It’s not always peaches and cream, but this is a place that you know is always going to be real .

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The partial shutdown of the federal government enters a second day – affecting tens of thousands of Maryland workers. Plus: an attempt to block the implementation of MD’s new gun law is denied, police enforce a new ban on hand-held cell phone use while driving, and more.

Credit: Kurhan / stock.xchng

The federal government is closed today, but the Maryland Health Connection is open. It's the state's new online marketplace for consumers to comparison-shop and buy their own health insurance. We talk with Rebecca Pearce, executive director of the marketplace, as well as with executives of two of Maryland's health insurers about what consumers should expect.

Maryland’s economy will feel the impact of the partial federal government shutdown; some 10 percent of MD’s civilian workforce is employed by the government. More on the shutdown, plus: a look at the health insurance exchanges opening enrollment today, and the new MD laws taking effect.

With a partial shutdown of the federal government looming, the 300-thousand federal workers who live in MD wait to see if they’ll be furloughed. MD’s new gun law kicks in tomorrow, so does a law making use of a hand-held cell phone while driving a primary offense. Plus: Vacants to Value, casino funds, and more.

President Obama visited Maryland yesterday to talk about the Affordable Care Act. If Congress fails to pass a budget bill because of GOP efforts to defund that law, Maryland could lose $5-million a day in income and sales taxes. Plus: a challenge to MD’s new gun law, and more.

Maryland will likely float $1.16-billion in bonds next year. The state’s highest court says public defenders must be available to poor people at bail hearings. The ACLU criticizes Baltimore Police’s decision to call “Stop and Frisk” “Investigative Stops.” Mikulski on Obamacare. And more.

Senator Barbara Mikulski says a government shutdown would be “terrible for our economy.” Doug Gansler launches his gubernatorial bid. Marylanders applying for gun purchase background checks before October 1st will not have to get handgun licenses. And more.

Credit: slonecker / stock.xchng
Credit: slonecker / stock.xchng

The health-insurance exchanges are scheduled to open a week from today, and opponents are still trying to delay or defund Obamacare. In “The Checkup” we ask Politico health care reporter Paige Winfield Cunningham how it will play out here.

Gansler enters the governor’s race; Brown picks up Sarbanes’ endorsement; a new poll of likely Democratic voters puts Brown ahead. The GOP gets new leadership in the State Senate. Leopold looks for a political comeback. A look at the new gun law that takes effect next week. And more.

CGoulao

In this first of two programs devoted to Bach’s towering masterpiece, Tom Hall welcomes back noted lecturer Ray Sprenkle to talk about JS Bach’s singular place in the pantheon of great composers, in advance of Choral Arts concert performance of The B Minor Mass on October 27, 2013 at Kraushaar Auditorium.

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