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Pugh releases plan to reduce homelessness

The 26-page plan recommends increased affordable housing, eviction prevention, improving the capacity and quality of family shelters and services and promoting a housing first model.

WYPR News

DOMINIQUE MARIA BONESSI

Hundreds of teachers, parents, elected officials, and other community members filled the auditorium at the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute Thursday night to advocate for a more equitable approach to funding Maryland’s public schools. On the other side of their pleas was a state commission tasked with overhauling the current funding model. WYPR’s Rachel Baye was at the public hearing and joins Nathan Sterner to discuss it.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

While thousands of people in Baltimore City remain homeless, uninsured, or under insured, one event this week provided a one-stop shop to residents for dental work, vision care, job searching, and more.

Baltimore Police

Trial boards for three of the five Baltimore police officers involved in the Freddie Gray case are to begin this month in public, but their results may remain private.

The hearings for Sgt. Alicia White, Lt. Brian Rice, and Officer Caesar Goodson Jr. may be open, but City Solicitor Andre Davis says it could be difficult making the outcomes of those hearings public.

Baltimore County

The Baltimore County School Board is considering a proposal to keep schools open during the Jewish holidays next September. But the board got some blowback for that idea during a public hearing Tuesday night. WYPR's John Lee and Nathan Sterner talked about it on Morning Edition.

Ted Kerwin/flickr

Some time before new calendars are posted in offices and kitchen walls around town, a potentially significant summit will take place, presumably in the Orioles offices in the warehouse.

The outcome of that meeting may go a long way toward whether the Birds’ 2018 looks anything like their 2017.

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Travel to Cuba with WYPR

Join WYPR Radio and fellow jazz lovers for a culturally-rich musical journey to Cuba!

Out of the Blocks

all photos by Wendel Patrick

3600 Falls Road, part 1

“I think the word we’re dancing around is ‘gentrification.’” So says Benn Ray of Atomic Books at the outset of this episode. What follows is a multidimensional portrait of a neighborhood in flux. The 3600 block of Falls Road is a mix of longtime rowhome residents, recovering opiate addicts, and a new wave of business owners whose trendy boutiques have come to redefine a neighborhood that’s been in long economic decline. Who does Hampden belong to? The answer depends who you ask.

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Tom Clancy, the best-selling writer of such "techno-thrillers" as The Hunt for Red October, Red Storm Rising and Patriot Games, has died.

He was 66.

The partial shutdown of the federal government enters a second day – affecting tens of thousands of Maryland workers. Plus: an attempt to block the implementation of MD’s new gun law is denied, police enforce a new ban on hand-held cell phone use while driving, and more.

Credit: Kurhan / stock.xchng

The federal government is closed today, but the Maryland Health Connection is open. It's the state's new online marketplace for consumers to comparison-shop and buy their own health insurance. We talk with Rebecca Pearce, executive director of the marketplace, as well as with executives of two of Maryland's health insurers about what consumers should expect.

Maryland’s economy will feel the impact of the partial federal government shutdown; some 10 percent of MD’s civilian workforce is employed by the government. More on the shutdown, plus: a look at the health insurance exchanges opening enrollment today, and the new MD laws taking effect.

With a partial shutdown of the federal government looming, the 300-thousand federal workers who live in MD wait to see if they’ll be furloughed. MD’s new gun law kicks in tomorrow, so does a law making use of a hand-held cell phone while driving a primary offense. Plus: Vacants to Value, casino funds, and more.

President Obama visited Maryland yesterday to talk about the Affordable Care Act. If Congress fails to pass a budget bill because of GOP efforts to defund that law, Maryland could lose $5-million a day in income and sales taxes. Plus: a challenge to MD’s new gun law, and more.

Maryland will likely float $1.16-billion in bonds next year. The state’s highest court says public defenders must be available to poor people at bail hearings. The ACLU criticizes Baltimore Police’s decision to call “Stop and Frisk” “Investigative Stops.” Mikulski on Obamacare. And more.

Senator Barbara Mikulski says a government shutdown would be “terrible for our economy.” Doug Gansler launches his gubernatorial bid. Marylanders applying for gun purchase background checks before October 1st will not have to get handgun licenses. And more.

Credit: slonecker / stock.xchng
Credit: slonecker / stock.xchng

The health-insurance exchanges are scheduled to open a week from today, and opponents are still trying to delay or defund Obamacare. In “The Checkup” we ask Politico health care reporter Paige Winfield Cunningham how it will play out here.

Gansler enters the governor’s race; Brown picks up Sarbanes’ endorsement; a new poll of likely Democratic voters puts Brown ahead. The GOP gets new leadership in the State Senate. Leopold looks for a political comeback. A look at the new gun law that takes effect next week. And more.

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