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Hogan unveils plan to reduce violent crime in Baltimore

"We want to give these criminals fewer places to hide."

WYPR News

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Governor Larry Hogan released a plan to crack down on crime in Baltimore Tuesday, criticizing Mayor Catherine Pugh’s efforts. But the mayor was not impressed.

Hogan announced more state police patrols, more probation agents serving warrants and other initiatives. Pugh responded Wednesday morning.

Maryland Health Connection

If Congress repeals or stops enforcing the individual mandate and Maryland doesn’t change anything about the way its insurance market works, state residents will feel the effects quickly, health care experts warned a state commission Tuesday.

“If we don’t act next year, it’s very likely we won’t have an individual market in 2019 in Maryland,” said Deb Rivkin, Vice President of Government Affairs for Maryland at Carefirst Blue Cross Blue Shield, the state’s largest health insurer.

Karen Hosler / WYPR

Gavin Buckley took office as Annapolis Mayor yesterday, following a swearing-in ceremony that featured the national anthem, bible belt spirituals, and a dance performance of the James Brown tune "Sex Machine." WYPR's Karen Hosler took in the proceedings (tapping her toes for part of them), and talked about them and Buckley's proprieties with Nathan Sterner.

Tom Newby/flickr

It’s normally not our habit to be concerned with the University of Tennessee’s football team.

Goodness knows there are enough issues with the state university football squad in this area, or hadn’t you noticed the 66-3 thumping that Penn State administered to Maryland a couple of weeks ago to close the Terps 4-8 season?

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Thousands of people gathered in Mount Pleasant Church Wednesday for the funeral of Baltimore Detective Sean Suiter, who was fatally shot two weeks ago in Harlem Park.

Christmas garland and wreaths hung from the church balconies and large bouquets lined the edge of the pulpit where Mayor Catherine Pugh, Governor Larry Hogan, and Police Commissioner Kevin Davis spoke of Suiter’s calm demeanor and heroic choices.

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NPR’s Book Concierge

A Perfect Last Minute Gift Idea

Out of the Blocks

all photos by Wendel Patrick

Out of the Ville, part 1

We’re all taught that housing desegregation was a good thing, right? But if you talk to the old-timers in The Ville, they’ll give you a more nuanced story: They’ll tell you it was a gift that came with a curse. In its heyday, The Ville was the beating heart of black Saint Louis, with historic African American institutions like Sumner High School and Homer G Phillips Hospital. Desegregation opened the floodgates for a mass-exodus from The Ville, and now the neighborhood is more than 60 percent vacant. Out of the Blocks travels to the Ville for this special episode, produced in collaboration with the Saint Louis Public Radio podcast We Live Here and the neighborhood organization 4 The Ville . This episode was made possible by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

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WYPR AND NPR NEWS

President Obama asks Congress to postpone a vote on strikes in Syria; Rep. Andy Harris says he’d vote no; Rep. Chris Van Hollen proposes resolution to keep the pressure on. Plus: McClement, Young win Frederick mayoral primary, flags at half-staff to remember 9-11, and more.

marfis75 / Flickr / Creative Commons
marfis75 / Flickr / Creative Commons

Maryland’s health insurance exchange goes online in three weeks. How much do you know about your new options for health coverage? We ask Kathleen Westcoat from the nonprofit HealthCare Access Maryland who will help the public navigate the online marketplace.

Senator Barbara Mikulski says she’s supporting President Obama’s plan to launch military strikes in Syria. The Baltimore City Council has approved a plan to grand $107-million in tax increment financing to the Harbor Point development. Today is Frederick’s primary election day. And more.

The Baltimore City Council will likely give final approval today on a plan to grant the Harbor Point development $107-million in tax increment financing. Plus: Vice President Biden visits the Port of Baltimore, MD Police get help on gun purchase background checks, and MD lawmakers on Syria.

Senator Barbara Mikulski says there is a compelling case that nerve gas was used by the regime of Syrian leader Bashar Assad, but remains undecided on whether a US military strike is the best response. Plus: calls for a higher MD minimum wage, August casino revenues, and more.

Senator Ben Cardin was one of the lawmakers on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee who voted yesterday to approve a resolution authorizing limited US military action in Syria. Plus: funding for Baltimore’s Red Line, weekend MARC service, sequestration mitigation, and more.

Maryland lawmakers consider US force in Syria. Governor O’Malley is set to unveil $1.5-billion in state funds Baltimore-area transportation projects. An update on the Annapolis mayoral race. An ad campaign to educate Marylanders about their new insurance options. And more.

As Congressional debate over military strikes in Syria nears, Rep. John Sarbanes says he understands people are “weary and wary” of foreign military intervention. Plus: Lollar enters race for GOP gubernatorial nomination, a report on Frederick’s mayoral race, and more.

A roundup of some of the schedule changes in effect on this Labor Day. Maryland lawmakers welcome a debate over whether to authorize military strikes in Syria. Plus: a port of Baltimore expansion, OC parking meters, development in Anne Arundel County, and more.

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