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Officers convicted in GTTF trial

Could face up to 60 years in prison

WYPR News

JohnLee

  

Governor Larry Hogan is making no commitments as to how much the state will kick in to help Baltimore County pay for a new Dulaney High School, despite concerns about the cost of the project.

 

mike dupris/flickr

Football builds men. Football builds strength. Football builds character.

Those are mantras uttered as near gospel by virtually every coach, player and official who has been around the game, for as long as the game has been played.

But if certain members of the Maryland General Assembly have their way, some of that gospel will have to change, will have to be preached through a new testament of sorts, one that de-emphasizes violence among young players.

A Baltimore County Councilman is accusing County Executive Kevin Kamenetz of making fiscal decisions that are unsustainable.

 

Last fall, Kamenetz said he’d have to think about building a new Dulaney High School. Last week, he decided to do it. Councilman Tom Quirk is concerned the outgoing county executive is making promises the county won’t be able to keep.

 

 

Mary Rose Madden

For nearly three weeks, former police officers, drug dealers who were granted immunity to testify, a bail bondsman and others have painted a picture of a Baltimore Police Department where officers routinely robbed citizens, planted evidence and falsified time sheets.

Now a jury is deliberating whether to convict two of those officers, members of the now disbanded Gun Trace Task Force, of federal racketeering, robbery and wire fraud.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Baltimore’s acting Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa announced additional internal changes to the department Friday. The appointment of one deputy commissioner, Thomas Cassella, is being held up.

De Sousa had named Cassella to be Deputy Commissioner for the Operations Bureau, but documents were leaked to the media alleging two disciplinary complaints against him.

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NPR Coverage of the 2018 Olympic Games

The Torch provides full coverage of the Winter games from PyeongChang

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Out of the Blocks

all photos by Wendel Patrick

100 S Broadway, part 3

If we’re truthful about it, most of us will admit it: There’s a gap between who we are and who we yearn to be. In this episode, people confront the sting of getting honest with themselves. In the end, some find redemption, and some just stare into the abyss. There’s darkness in this episode, yes, but rays of hope have a way of shining in through the cracks. As you’ll hear Francesca say, “Life is too short, the world is too cruel. Just love one another.”

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WYPR AND NPR NEWS

President Obama asks Congress to postpone a vote on strikes in Syria; Rep. Andy Harris says he’d vote no; Rep. Chris Van Hollen proposes resolution to keep the pressure on. Plus: McClement, Young win Frederick mayoral primary, flags at half-staff to remember 9-11, and more.

marfis75 / Flickr / Creative Commons
marfis75 / Flickr / Creative Commons

Maryland’s health insurance exchange goes online in three weeks. How much do you know about your new options for health coverage? We ask Kathleen Westcoat from the nonprofit HealthCare Access Maryland who will help the public navigate the online marketplace.

Senator Barbara Mikulski says she’s supporting President Obama’s plan to launch military strikes in Syria. The Baltimore City Council has approved a plan to grand $107-million in tax increment financing to the Harbor Point development. Today is Frederick’s primary election day. And more.

The Baltimore City Council will likely give final approval today on a plan to grant the Harbor Point development $107-million in tax increment financing. Plus: Vice President Biden visits the Port of Baltimore, MD Police get help on gun purchase background checks, and MD lawmakers on Syria.

Senator Barbara Mikulski says there is a compelling case that nerve gas was used by the regime of Syrian leader Bashar Assad, but remains undecided on whether a US military strike is the best response. Plus: calls for a higher MD minimum wage, August casino revenues, and more.

Senator Ben Cardin was one of the lawmakers on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee who voted yesterday to approve a resolution authorizing limited US military action in Syria. Plus: funding for Baltimore’s Red Line, weekend MARC service, sequestration mitigation, and more.

Maryland lawmakers consider US force in Syria. Governor O’Malley is set to unveil $1.5-billion in state funds Baltimore-area transportation projects. An update on the Annapolis mayoral race. An ad campaign to educate Marylanders about their new insurance options. And more.

As Congressional debate over military strikes in Syria nears, Rep. John Sarbanes says he understands people are “weary and wary” of foreign military intervention. Plus: Lollar enters race for GOP gubernatorial nomination, a report on Frederick’s mayoral race, and more.

A roundup of some of the schedule changes in effect on this Labor Day. Maryland lawmakers welcome a debate over whether to authorize military strikes in Syria. Plus: a port of Baltimore expansion, OC parking meters, development in Anne Arundel County, and more.

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