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The mayoral election hasn't happened yet, but Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about transitions from William Donald Schaefer to Kurt Schmoke all the way to...Catherine Pugh?

P. Kenneth Burns

Former Mayor Sheila Dixon insists she’s not a sore loser. But during an appearance on WYPR’s Midday Tuesday, she repeated her charge that questions still linger about the integrity of the results of the primary election she lost in April.

Rachel Baye


In Western Maryland, politics can be a sensitive subject.

Rachel Baye

State officials are reapplying for a federal grant to expand Baltimore’s 121-year-old Howard Street Tunnel, which CSX Transportation uses for its freight trains, Gov. Larry Hogan announced Monday during a news conference at the Port of Baltimore.


Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump could not disagree more on climate change. Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, sees it as a real threat while Trump, the Republican, dismisses it as a hoax.

And because climate change can lead to rising sea level, among other things, their views on the subject are important to those who live and work on the Chesapeake Bay.

Fraser Smith and Todd Eberly, of the political science faculty at St. Mary's College of Maryland, talk about GOP nominee Donald Trump's refusal to say whether he'll accept the results of next month's election.

Pugh and Harris: P. Kenneth Burns/Walden: Walden For Mayor campaign

For the first time since 1999, the seat for Baltimore Mayor is open because Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake isn’t seeking a second elected term in office.

On November 8, city residents will have a choice between Democrat Catherine Pugh, Republican Alan Walden and the Green Party’s Joshua Harris.

For nearly half a century, the general election has been a mere formality for the Democratic candidate running to lead Charm City.  That was evident when Rawlings-Blake commented on the race in September.

Jonna McKone

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Coleman Report, a landmark study led by then Johns Hopkins University sociologist James Coleman. The study found an enormous achievement gap on test scores between black and white children and was the basis for the busing programs of the 70’s to achieve racial balance in schools.

Fraser Smith and John Lee, of the WYPR news team, talk about Trump supporters' plans to monitor polls in Baltimore City and Prince Georges County on election day.


If you go around asking people who they plan to vote for, for president this year, you will find many are passionate about their choices. And that choice often has a lot to do with not liking the other candidate.

Take Liz Freedman, who lives in Reisterstown and plans to vote for Hillary Clinton.

"I could never vote for Donald Trump," Freedman said. "He is a misogynist."

Then there is Ed Aldridge, who lives in Essex.

"Trump all the way," he said. "Hillary will run the country into the ground."