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How do you build healthy relationships with friends, family, and partners after surviving sexual or domestic violence? How does abuse impact your ability to trust and love? We speak to Saida Agostini, social worker and chief operating officer of the group FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture, about her upcoming workshop in Baltimore, “Building Our Tribe: Love as an Act of Resistance.” It’s the first in a monthly series of events hosted by FORCE's sexual and domestic violence survivor collective, Gather Together.

John Lee

More than 23,000 families in Baltimore County are on a waiting list for housing vouchers once known as Section 8. And while they're waiting, the long running debate over where to put affordable housing in the   county rolls on.

Take Chanel Harris, for example. She's been waiting for a federally-subsidized housing voucher to help her pay her rent 1998.

Harris said her name was deleted from the voucher list a couple of times, so she had to reapply. The last time she did that was 10 years ago. While she waits, Harris, her three children and her aunt live in her grandmother’s three bedroom apartment in Woodlawn.

Joel McCord and John Lee, of the WYPR news team, discuss a measure making its way through the General Assembly that would keep landlords from automatically turning down renters with housing vouchers.

P. Kenneth Burns

Apprenticeships have always been a way to provide on-the-job training for people who want to work in the skilled trades; like a carpenter or electrician.

Not so much for IT, until now.

Rachel Baye

The Maryland House of Delegates voted along party lines Wednesday to make it easier for the state attorney general to sue the federal government.

Johns Hopkins University

*This edition of Midday was shortened to accommodate NPR's special coverage of President Trump's press conference with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

 

Genome editing, that is the ability to make additions, deletions, and alterations to the genome of a human or animal, is not a new. Scientists have been experimenting with it in labs for a while to better understand the way some diseases and disabilities work. But now a new report released yesterday from the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine sets international guidelines for genome editing. New editing tools like CRISPR have opened up the doors for more lab and clinical research projects. The scientists behind the report hope their guidelines will serve as a roadmap to help other scientists avoid the ethical concerns associated with gene editing.

Jonna McKone

With Baltimore city schools facing a $130 million shortfall-- roughly 10 percent of the annual budget—schools CEO Sonja Santelises has warned of painful cuts, including teacher layoffs.

Some of the specifics are beginning to take shape as school principals received their budgets last week.

Job Grotsky, the principal at Mount Royal Elementary in Bolton Hill says next year’s budget is significantly smaller than in the past.  He’s probably going to lay off nine people, some of them teachers.

“As a result we basically have to build the school from the ground up,” he said.

Rachel Baye

The Maryland House of Delegates is expected to vote Wednesday to expand the state attorney general’s powers so that he can sue the federal government.

Current law requires the governor or legislature to agree before the attorney general can bring a lawsuit. Democratic Attorney General Brian Frosh says he needs this change so that he can challenge many of President Donald Trump’s policies as quickly as the new president implements them.

In today's episode of "More Than Words," Xavier, a Frederick Douglass High School student shares his connection to an issue all too common in Baltimore City--gun violence.

Courtesy of the DANCE IQUAIL! Facebook page

A dance production being staged at Goucher College later this month draws inspiration from the songs of singer and activist Nina Simone. Choreographer Iquail Shaheed, assistant professor and the founder of DANCE IQUAIL!, tells us how “Black Swan,” uses dance and music to shed light on issues of race, identity and isolation in ballet. And Goucher sophomore Jamison Curcio tells us about what the production means to her as a African American dancer.

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