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Midday with Dan Rodricks: Tue. Aug. 25, 1-2 PM
12:39 pm
Wed August 26, 2015

Midday on Tech

Telecommunications giant, AT&T, has been confirmed as being an informant for the NSA for decades.

For decades, telecom giant AT&T provided the National Security Agency with billions of emails and telephone calls, and it helped wiretap all Internet communications at United Nations Headquarters in New York. The relationship between AT&T and NSA has been described as “unique and especially productive” and, according to the New York Times, AT&T had an extreme willingness to help NSA, long before the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In this hour of Midday. Sean Gallagher, Baltimore-based IT editor of ars technica, talks about AT&T and mass surveillance, and what’s ahead for bulk data collection.

The Morning Economic Report
12:36 pm
Wed August 26, 2015

The Best Way to Reduce Carbon Emissions at Home - 8/26/15

Managers of utilities and power grids in America are learning that the best way to reduce carbon emissions and improve efficiency is by having people change their light bulbs.  The nation’s largest electricity grid, which serves more than sixty one million customers from Washington to Chicago, is revising its demand forecasts after recognizing that better lighting has undercut its projections. 

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Maryland Morning Podcast
12:01 pm
Wed August 26, 2015

Remembering Julian Bond; A Life That Matters With Wes Moore; Rebellion As Education

Civil rights activist, Julian Bond, died ten days ago at the age of 75.
Credit Reston Community Center via flickr Creative Commons

The charismatic equal-rights champion, Julian Bond, died ten days ago. He was 75. He served two decades in the Georgia legislature, and taught history for two decades at the University of Virginia – but he was connected to Maryland, also, through the dozen years he served as chair of theNAACP, headquartered here in Baltimore. All that came after the demonstrations and sit-ins of the 1960's, when Bond became a national figure as a founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. One admirer wrote last week, “SNCC was the #BlackLivesMatter movement before there were hashtags.” 

Also, In 2010, author Wes Moore published a best-selling book, "The Other Wes Moore," which told the story of his childhood and early adulthood, as well as that of another young man, who grew up in Baltimore, in the same neighborhood and, coincidentally, with the same name. Their outcomes, however, couldn’t be more different. One Wes Moore was convicted of murder, and imprisoned for life, while the Wes Moore I spoke with graduated from Johns Hopkins University, went on to be a Rhodes Scholar, became a decorated war veteran, an investment banker, a White House Fellow, an entrepreneur, and television host.

Plus, Jay Gillen was a founding teacher-director of theStadium School in Baltimore City, who is still teaching math in the City Schools, and working closely with the Baltimore Algebra Project.  In a book published last fall, he indicts an educational system that he says is stacked against poor and disadvantaged students. He suggests that we change that by encouraging students to organize and rebel.  The book is called “Educating for Insurgency: The Roles of Young People in Schools of Poverty.” 

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed August 26, 2015

Remembering Civil Rights Activist, Julian Bond

Civil rights activist, Julian Bond, died ten days ago at the age of 75.
Credit Reston Community Center via flickr Creative Commons

The charismatic equal-rights champion, Julian Bond, died ten days ago. He was 75. He served two decades in the Georgia legislature, and taught history for two decades at the University of Virginia – but he was connected to Maryland, also, through the dozen years he served as chair of the NAACP, headquartered here in Baltimore. All that came after the demonstrations and sit-ins of the 1960's, when Bond became a national figure as a founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. One admirer wrote last week, “SNCC was the #BlackLivesMatter movement before there were hashtags.” 
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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed August 26, 2015

Baltimore Author Wes Moore On Living A Life That Matters

    

In 2010, author Wes Moore published a best-selling book, "The Other Wes Moore," which told the story of his childhood and early adulthood, as well as that of another young man, who grew up in Baltimore, in the same neighborhood and, coincidentally, with the same name. Their outcomes, however, couldn’t be more different. One Wes Moore was convicted of murder, and imprisoned for life, while the Wes Moore I spoke with graduated from Johns Hopkins University, went on to be a Rhodes Scholar, became a decorated war veteran, an investment banker, a White House Fellow, an entrepreneur, and television host.

Read more

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