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Maryland Morning Podcast
11:33 am
Fri October 31, 2014

How Slavery Ended In Maryland, "The Baltimore Atrocities," and Gerry Sandusky

Credit Internet Archive Book Images/Flickr

In the summer of 1864, a year and a half after Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation declared slaves in the Confederate states to be free. It would not be until several months later, November 1, 1864, that enslaved people in Maryland were declared free.  How did it happen?  And what happened next?  Two scholars of emancipation join Sheilah to talk about it.

Then, Nathan speaks with John Dermot Woods about his book, "The Baltimore Atrocities."

Plus, WBAL Television sports director Gerry Sandusky joins Tom Hall to discuss sports and Sandusky's new memoir. 

Midday with Dan Rodricks: Fri. Oct. 31, 1-2 p.m.
10:04 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Poverty Capitalism: The Cost of Being Poor, Part II

Tipped-wage workers are being left behind in the fight to increase the minimum wage.

We continue our discussion about poverty capitalism with a look at workers and consumers in Maryland. ​Susan Francis, deputy director of the Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service, talks about the new Abell Report that explains Baltimore's tax sales policy, and how it adversely affects the city's poorest homeowners. Marceline White, executive director for the Maryland Consumer Rights Coalition, explains how rent-to-own stores and payday loans are risky bets for people who have difficulty getting credit.

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Midday with Dan Rodricks: Fri. Oct. 31, 12-1 p.m.
10:00 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Poverty Capitalism: The Cost of Being Poor, Part I

Offenders paying for their own ankle bracelets is one example of how the criminal justice system adversely affects the poor.

Contact with the criminal justice system has become increasingly expensive. Many states charge fees for services, such as public defenders, that used to be free, and more crimes are being punished by fines as an alternative to jail time. Offenders who can’t afford to pay often face many obstacles, including fines for their inability to pay, and increased time on probation or in jail.

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Maryland Morning
9:30 am
Fri October 31, 2014

How Slavery Ended In Maryland

Credit Internet Archive Book Images/Flickr

In the summer of 1864, a year and a half after Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation declared slaves in the Confederate states to be free, a black woman named Annie Davis, who lived in Belair, in Harford County, wrote Lincoln a letter.  " Dear Mr. President, it is my desire to be free to go see my people on the Eastern Shore.  My mistress won't let me.  Will you please let me know if we are free?" It would not be until several months later, November 1, 1864 -- one hundred fifty years ago tomorrow -- that enslaved people in Maryland were declared free.  How did it happen?  And what happened next?  Two scholars of emancipation join us to talk about it.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri October 31, 2014

"The Baltimore Atrocities"

"The Baltimore Atrocities” is the title of the latest book by author John Dermot Woods. It’s a novel, but it’s not like any other novel you've ever read. It’s composed of a series of short tragic stories – the "atrocities" of the title – all of which are loosely connected to a larger narrative, involving missing children, and their siblings’ search for answers. That story, in itself, an atrocity. John Dermot Woods currently spends his days in Brooklyn, New York. But, the time spent here in Charm City appears to have affected him deeply. He joins Nathan Sterner to discuss the book.

Maryland Morning
8:50 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Gerry Sandusky: "Forgotten Sundays"

Gerry Sandusky is Tom's guest this morning.  He is the Sports Director at WBAL Television, and the play-by-play announcer for the Baltimore Ravens on the Ravens Radio Network.  Earlier this year, he published a poignant and moving memoir of growing up as one of five children of John Sandusky, who played for the Cleveland Browns and Green Bay Packers, and who went on to a long coaching career with the Baltimore Colts, the Philadelphia Eagles, and the Miami Dolphins.

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Baltimore Stories
5:56 am
Fri October 31, 2014

The Time The Beatles Came To Baltimore

On Sunday afternoon, September 13, 1964, crowds of teenagers were circling the Civic Center, where the Beatles were set to play. They tried every ruse they knew to get through the gate without a ticket. One dressed herself in costume and told the guards she was the Beatles' personal maid and that they must let her in--the Beatles were expecting her. But the policeman in charge was no novice. 

Humanities Connection
5:20 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Veterans' Voices

On November 10, the Bob Parsons Veterans Center, the Maryland Humanities Council, and Spotlight UB present "Veterans’ Voices," a free evening of readings by veterans about their experiences, followed by facilitated discussion.


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