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Shots - Health News
3:01 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Anatomy Of A Dance Hit: Why We Love To Boogie With Pharrell

YouTube

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 8:32 am

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Shots - Health News
7:20 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

No Hunch Here: Richard III Suffered From Scoliosis Instead

Portrait of King Richard III.
Getty Images/The Bridgeman Art Library

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 8:03 pm

Shakespeare calls Richard III "rudely stamp'd," with the king's "hunchbacked" form revealing the twisted soul within. Actors have reveled in playing the monarch as a limping, deformed creature with a withered arm.

But when the bones of the 15th century king were unearthed from beneath a British parking lot in 2012, the skeleton showed no evidence of a hunch. Instead, the vertebrae lay in a curve suggesting that Richard might have had scoliosis.

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The Two-Way
7:04 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

'No Evidence' Snowden Raised Concerns While At NSA

NSA leaker Edward Snowden during a meeting with Russian activists and officials at Sheremetyevo airport, shortly after he first arrived in Russia last year.
Tatyana Lokshina AP

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 7:34 pm

Edward Snowden says that during his time as a contractor with the National Security Agency he raised concerns about the extent of its electronic surveillance, but the NSA's own search of email shows he only asked the agency's legal department for a single "clarification" on a technical issue.

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Code Switch
6:47 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Condiment Detente: Sriracha Plant To Stay In California City

Sriracha chili sauce is produced at the Huy Fong Foods factory in Irwindale, Calif.
Nick Ut AP

The Sriracha-slurping public no longer has to worry about hoarding bottles and bottles of the spicy stuff: There will be hot sauce tomorrow and for the foreseeable future. Sriracha will continue to be made in the state-of-the-art plant David Tran built in Irwindale, Calif. And residents near the plant who complained about spicy odors when chilies for the famous hot sauce were ground (from roughly August to October, during harvest season) should now be able to breathe more easily.

You get the feeling that this whole thing was a schoolyard spat that got out of control.

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The Salt
5:37 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Economic Upswing Has Fewer Americans Receiving Food Stamps

A woman and her daughter shop at a Greenmarket in New York City using Electronic Benefits Transfer, or food stamps. Government data show that fewer people were receiving the benefits in February 2014 than at the peak in December 2012.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 7:11 pm

Critics of the food stamp program have been alarmed in recent years by its rapid growth. Last year, about 1 in 7 people in the U.S. received food stamps, or SNAP benefits, as they're called. That's almost 48 million people, a record high.

But the numbers have started to drop. In February, the last month for which figures were available, 1.6 million fewer people received food stamps than at the peak in December 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which runs the program.

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Shots - Health News
5:37 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Ready, Set, Spray! Brazil Battles Dengue Ahead Of The World Cup

The World Cup will come to the Arena de Sao Paola, shown here when it was under construction last fall. Brazil is also making a big push to control the local mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever.
Friedemann Vogel Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 7:11 pm

In Sao Paulo's poor north zone, in the neighborhood of Tucuruvi, teams of city workers knock on doors, warning people to take pets and small children out of the area.

Quickly after, men in hazmat suits with metal cylinders strapped to their backs start spraying the street, and some of the interiors of the homes, with powerful pesticides. This is the front line of the war on dengue fever in Brazil's largest city.

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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Husband Of Woman Beaten, Shot To Death In Pakistan Killed First Wife

Mohammad Iqbal sits beside the body of his wife, Farzana, after she was stoned to death earlier this week by her family for marrying against their wishes. Iqbal has since admitted that he killed his first wife in order to remarry.
Rahat Dar EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 11:20 am

A man whose pregnant wife was stoned to death by angry relatives in Pakistan earlier this week has admitted that he killed his first wife so he could remarry.

It's a disturbing twist to the already disturbing story that we reported on Tuesday of 25-year-old Farzana Parveen, who was bludgeoned to death with bricks by her family after she eloped with Mohammad Iqbal instead of marrying a cousin as her family demanded.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

'Night Moves' Leaves Too Much In The Dark

In Night Moves, Josh (Jesse Eisenberg) and two other partners in crime (played by Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard) plot to load a boat with explosives and blow up a dam in an act of consciousness-raising eco-terrorism.
Cinedigm

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 7:09 pm

The natural world has never been the most hospitable place for Kelly Reichardt's characters. In Meek's Cutoff, a group of 19th century settlers nearly lose their lives while traveling west across the scorching Oregon desert. In Wendy and Lucy, when Wendy is forced to sleep in the woods after her car breaks down on the way to Alaska, she wakes up in the middle of the night to a deranged man talking to himself right by her side.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

MacFarlane's 'Million Ways To Die In The West' Is An Assault Of Its Own

Seth MacFarlane, who wrote and directed A Million Ways to Die in the West, stars as Albert, a cowardly sheep farmer who inadvertently falls in love with the wife (Charlize Theron) of a dangerous outlaw (Liam Neeson).
Universal Pictures

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 7:54 pm

There's a scene in Seth MacFarlane's animated sitcom Family Guy in which the precocious baby Stewie attempts to get his mom's attention through a solid 30 seconds of just repeating her name or variations on the word "mom." That's the whole joke: A kid just keeps repeating essentially the same word for 30 seconds until he wears her down, and then he doesn't have anything more to say than "hi" once he finally gets her attention.

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Politics
4:50 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Old Senate Tradition Lies Behind Controversial Judge's Nomination

There's an idea in the Senate that it's still a chamber operating on mutual respect and goodwill between colleagues. That's why venerable traditions like "blue slips" — slips of paper senators can use to block any White House choice for judgeships in their home state — carry over today.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 10:56 am

As President Obama continues to take heat for nominating to the federal bench a judge who once wanted to keep the Confederate emblem on the Georgia state flag, the White House says what's partly to blame for the choice is an old Senate tradition.

It turns out that tradition — which gives virtual veto power over judicial nominations to home state senators — helps explain why almost all the judicial vacancies without nominees are now in states with Republican senators.

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