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World
5:11 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Nowhere To Go,' Ugandan LGBT Activist Applies For Asylum In U.S.

At a news conference in Boston on May 6, Ugandan LGBT activist John Abdallah Wambere says he is seeking asylum in the U.S.
Josh Reynolds AP

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 6:31 pm

Citing an environment of fear, persecution and anti-gay violence in his home country of Uganda, John Abdallah Wambere has applied for asylum in the United States.

Wambere, 41, came to prominence for his work with Spectrum Uganda Initiatives, an organization that advocates for LGBT rights and provides health and education services.

He announced his decision to seek asylum at a news conference on May 6 in Boston. Wambere is currently living in Cambridge, Mass.

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Television
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Stand Up Planet' Follows Jokes To Serious Global Issues

As part of the documentary Stand Up Planet, South African comedian Mpho Popps (left) and Indian comedian Aditi Mittal (right) came to Los Angeles to perform with Hasan Minhaj at the Laugh Factory.
Courtesy of StandUpPlanet.org

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 9:45 am

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Author Interviews
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

For Artistic Criminal, Breaking Rules Is Key To 'Creativity'

Philippe Petit, a French high-wire artist, walks across a tightrope suspended between the World Trade Center towers in New York on Aug. 7, 1974.
Alan Welner AP

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 10:19 am

Philippe Petit says he hates books on creativity.

So his new book, Creativity: The Perfect Crime, isn't a compilation of ideas from great philosophers or creators.

The wirewalker, magician, street performer and artist breaks that mold with a book full of sketches and personal dialogue that captures his personal creative process.

And because it's so personal, he says, it will be more useful. "I'm not doing any rules. This is not a thesis on creativity. This is a kind of an outlaw confession," he tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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Around the Nation
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Despite Objections, Maine Governor Acts On Food Stamp Fraud

Gov. Paul LePage is using his executive power to push through new photo ID requirements on on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

To combat welfare and food stamp fraud, states across the nation are considering various steps, including requiring photos on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards. Massachusetts and New York are the only states with photo ID programs right now, but they'll soon be joined by Maine, whose Republican governor is using his executive authority to avoid a political battle and start a similar program.

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Shelly Sterling Says She'll 'Absolutely' Fight To Keep Her Half Of Clippers

Shelly Sterling, the wife of Donald Sterling owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, watches the Clippers against the Golden State Warriors in Game Four of the Western Conference Quarterfinals during the 2014 NBA Playoffs in Oakland, California.
Thearon W. Henderson Getty Images

Shelly Sterling, the wife of embattled Clippers owner Donald Sterling, tells ABC News she will "absolutely" fight any NBA attempt to oust her as owner.

Shelly owns half of Los Angeles Clippers.

ABC News adds:

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The Two-Way
3:48 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Secretary Of Defense Says Ban On Transgender People Should Be Reviewed

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel says he's open to reviewing the military's ban on transgender service members.

In an interview with ABC News, Hagel said while the issue is more complicated than allowing gays in the military because it requires medical support, the policies "continually should be reviewed."

ABC News reports:

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Author Interviews
2:12 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Insatiable': One Woman's Love Affair With The Porn Industry

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 8:03 am

Asa Akira had a happy childhood. The daughter of an upper middle-class family, she attended private schools in New York City and in Japan, where she lived for six years as a child.

"I'm from a very normal family," she tells NPR's Arun Rath. "My parents are still together; nothing dramatic or traumatic has ever happened to me."

After high school, as her peers started careers or went off to college, Akira decided to pursue her dream job: porn star.

Akira says even from an early age, she was both comfortable with her own sexuality and interested in the sex industry.

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Shots - Health News
1:41 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Addicted And Pregnant: 'The Most Heart-Wrenching Experience Of My Life'

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 6:59 am

I bought my first and only pregnancy test when I was 26.

At the time, I had been doing a lot of meth. I was fortunate if I remembered to eat one meal a day. Refilling my birth-control prescription had become just another missed detail in a life that had ceased to have much meaning for me.

I was an addict, and I was staring at two very bright pink lines on a stick.

I showed the test to my boyfriend. "What are we going to do?" I asked. He replied, "Have a baby, I guess."

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Parallels
11:50 am
Sun May 11, 2014

What Three College Pals Say About Their Dreams In China

Pedestrians walk through the Sanlitun Village shopping district on May 2, in Beijing, China.
Xiao Lu Chu Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 12:51 pm

When you think of China, what pops to mind? Superhighways. Bullet trains. Gleaming skyscrapers. Economic growth. A booming middle class. Opportunity.

My friends and I graduated from college five years ago, embarking on lives that we hoped would be full of promise, excitement and opportunity. We all went to Minzu University of China (formerly known as the Central University for Nationalities), a prestigious school in Beijing.

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Asia
11:48 am
Sun May 11, 2014

As India Votes, Muslims Keep A Wary Eye On The Hindu Frontrunner

A group of Muslim men stand aside, waiting for a car convoy carrying candidate Narendra Modi to pass in the streets of Varanasi last week.
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

Monday is the final day of voting in India's election, the biggest democratic exercise in the world.

India is home to more than 1 billion people, 13 percent of them Muslims. Their mistrust of Narendra Modi, the Hindu nationalist leader running for prime minister, can tell us a great deal about India, a democratic country with a long history of religious violence between the Muslim minority and the Hindu majority.

Muslims Wary Of A Modi-Run India

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