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3:46 am
Mon July 6, 2015

A Few Miles From Mobile, A Wealth Of History, Nature — And Danger

A cypress tree swamp in Byrnes Lake, part of the more than 200,000-acre Mobile delta. It's the most biologically diverse river delta system in the country.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 10:44 am

This summer, Morning Edition is taking you on adventures off the beaten path — trails that transport us to a special, hidden place. We start just minutes from downtown Mobile, Ala., at the point where five rivers converge in the Mobile Bay Delta. With our trail guide, we discover centuries of history, and biodiversity like no other place in the country.

The point where five rivers empty into Mobile Bay is a fisherman and hunter's paradise, but it's also a draw for naturalists and history buffs.

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The Two-Way
3:45 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Pluto-Bound Spacecraft Nears Its Quarry

NASA's New Horizons mission will be the first ever to visit Pluto and its moons. This artist's conception shows the probe as it passes the dwarf planet.
JHUAPL/SwRI

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 6:54 pm

It has taken nearly a decade and 3 billion miles to get there, but scientists are about to get their first look at Pluto.

The New Horizons spacecraft is closing fast on the tiny world once thought to be at the edge of our solar system. On Tuesday the probe will begin an intensive nine-day scientific study of Pluto and its moons.

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Shots - Health News
3:45 am
Mon July 6, 2015

People With Brain Injuries Heal Faster If They Get Up And Get Moving

Nurses Katherine Malinak and Amy Young lift Louis DeMattio, a stroke patient, out of his hospital bed using a ceiling-mounted lift at the Cleveland Clinic.
Dustin Franz for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 8:00 am

When Kate Klein began working as a nurse in the Cleveland Clinic's Neurointensive Care Unit, one of the first things she noticed was that her patients spent a lot of time in bed. She knew patients with other injuries benefitted from getting up and moving early on, and she wondered why not patients with brain injuries.

"I asked myself that question. I asked my colleagues that question," Klein says. "Why aren't these patients getting out of bed? Is there something unique about patients with neurologic injury?"

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Television
3:44 am
Mon July 6, 2015

After Sketchy Science, Shark Week Promises To Turn Over A New Fin

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 10:54 am

It has been called the "Super Bowl of the ocean."

Shark Week is a ratings bonanza for the Discovery Channel with more than 40 million people tuning in last year. Shark Week kicked off this weekend with the most hours of programming ever in its 28-year history But many scientists think the huge audiences — and the hype — have come at the expense of real science.

A generation of shark scientists cut their teeth on Shark Week.

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U.S.
3:43 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Corruption On The Border: Dismantling Misconduct In The Rio Grande Valley

Jonathan Treviño shows seized contraband. The former police narcotics squad leader is currently serving 17 years in prison for reselling narcotics back to drug dealers.
Courtesy of Jonathan Treviño

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 11:57 am

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up pervasive misconduct by public servants in the Rio Grande Valley. But as NPR's John Burnett and Marisa Penaloza report, the problems are entrenched.

The Rio Grande Valley of Texas is a world apart, isolated by empty ranch land to the north, the Gulf to the east, and Mexico to the south. A million-and-a-half people live there amid dazzling wealth and stark poverty.

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