Andrea Appleton | WYPR

Andrea Appleton

Producer, On The Record

Andrea Appleton is a producer for On The Record. She comes to WYPR with years of experience as a freelance journalist filing stories for newspapers, magazines, and public radio. She has reported on topics ranging from bull riding to bionic fish, with an emphasis on science.  She is also former senior editor of the Baltimore City Paper, and a graduate of the Columbia University School of Journalism.

She and her husband live in Baltimore with their two young sons.

frankieleon/Flickr via Creative Commons

Every day doctors write more than 650,000 opioid prescriptions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In some of those cases, addiction follows. As a result, deaths from prescription opioids have more than quadrupled since 1999. Travis Rieder is a bioethicist at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics, and he personally experienced a dependence on opioids. He wrote about it in the January issue of the journal “Health Affairs,” and a portion of that article was excerpted in the Washington Post. Original air date: January 24, 2017.

Our criminal justice system is the largest and most expensive in the world. Critics have zeroed in on the disproportionate impact of mass incarceration on African-Americans. But many African-Americans supported the war on crime that began in the 1970s. Why? We speak to Yale law professor James Forman Jr., about his book “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America”.

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Small-muscle athletes. In the medical field, that’s the term for musicians. Musicians are prone to a range of injuries. It’s a pitfall of the profession. But unlike their large-muscle counterparts, musicians don’t get much pro-active attention when it comes to pain. As Dr. Raymond Wittstadt, attending hand surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital puts it, “I mean even at the high school level, most sports teams will have a trainer on the sidelines. There’s nobody in the wings of the BSO saying we practiced too long today, or we repeated that passage too many times.” Wittstadt has held a monthly musicians’ clinic at the center for more than 15 years.

Roaches, rats, bed-bugs, and other people-loving pests have been with us for centuries. And despite our best efforts, they persist. That’s particularly true in cities, especially in neighborhoods with a history of disinvestment. Pests are living symbols of our long battle with inequality. We hear from UMBC professor Dawn Biehler, author of "Pests in the City: Flies, Bedbugs, Cockroaches, and Rats".

via Wikimedia Commons

President Trump’s goals for reshaping the U.S. are starting to come into focus. His plans may be altered by the Republican Congress. But it’s not too soon to start assessing what the Trump economic agenda might mean for Maryland. We hear from Darius Irani, vice president of Innovation and Applied Research at Towson University and chief economist for the Regional Economic Studies Institute (RESI), and Anirban Basu, president and CEO of The Sage Policy group.

“A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know.” That’s a quotation from the famous photographer Diane Arbus, who died in 1971. Does the sentiment hold true in the age of the Internet? Do photographs still have the power to captivate? Today we talk to Baltimore artist and writer Mark Alice Durant, who has just published “27 Contexts: An Anecdotal History in Photography.” The book is part memoir and part meditation on the role of photography in our lives.

Janet Stephens is obsessed with the hairstyles of ancient Rome. Here's her story about how that happened. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com

RX: Laughter

Mar 17, 2017
Poi Photography/Flickr via Creative Commons

Laughter is the best medicine. It turns out there’s science to back up that old adage. Research has shown that a good belly laugh on a regular basis is as effective at lowering blood pressure as medication. Dr. Michael Miller directs the Center for Preventive Cardiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He’s also the author of “Heal Your Heart: The Positive Emotions Prescription to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease.” And his prescription doesn’t require a trip to the pharmacy. “We’re looking at about 5 to 15 minutes of laughter that either brings tears to your eyes or after the laughter episode is finished, you feel relaxed,” he says.

Larry C. Price/Undark Magazine

For a long time we’ve heard about the problems our love of cheap clothing causes around the world: problems like lax environmental and safety regulations, and child labor. Today we’re going to zero in on an industry you may not have heard as much about: leather. A riveting four-part visual tour of textile and tannery industries around the globe recently appeared in the online magazine Undark. We plan to focus on the tannery portion. Freelance journalists Debbie and Larry Price produced the series, with the support of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Both are former Baltimore Sun staffers and both join us from a studio near their home in Dayton, Ohio.

Cancer treatments like surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation can be harrowing, and the cancer often returns. But a new treatment has come into use: it harnesses the body’s own immune system to destroy cancer. So far, immunotherapy doesn’t work in most patients. But when it does, the results can seem miraculous. Cancer survivor Stephanie Joho had run out of treatment options when she discovered immunotherapy. She recalls a moment soon after she started treatment: “I sat at the dinner table and I remember crying. Because I looked at my parents and I said, ‘I’m hungry.’ I didn’t remember what that felt like. I hadn’t felt hunger in probably over a year.” She and Dr. Drew Pardoll, director of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at Johns Hopkins, join us.

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