Andrea Appleton | WYPR

Andrea Appleton

Producer, On The Record

Andrea Appleton is a producer for On The Record. She comes to WYPR with years of experience as a freelance journalist filing stories for newspapers, magazines, and public radio. She has reported on topics ranging from bull riding to bionic fish, with an emphasis on science.  She is also former senior editor of the Baltimore City Paper, and a graduate of the Columbia University School of Journalism.

She and her husband live in Baltimore with their two young sons.

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When you cannot sleep, the middle of the night can be a harrowing spot. Insomnia is all too familiar for many of us. Dr. Emerson Wickwire, director of the insomnia program at the University of Maryland Medical Center, joins us to talk about the causes of this maddening affliction and how best to summon the snooze.

JIMMIE / Flickr via Creative Commons

Fall is here and the school year is well under way. But some parents don’t have to worry about packing a lunch or getting their kids to the bus stop on time. They are homeschoolers, and nationwide, they’re a growing demographic. In Maryland, there are about 27,000 homeschooled kids. What motivates parents to homeschool? Is homeschooling possible in households with working parents? What are the benefits, and the challenges? 

PETER FAVELLE / Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland has too many deer. They cause tens of thousands of car accidents every year and over-browsing by hungry deer damages native ecosystems. The state typically tries to keep the population down through hunting. But some animal-rights advocates believe wildlife managers should explore other methods. 

Time for the next installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. Today Congressman Elijah Cummings tells the story of the integration of Riverside Park Pool in south Baltimore, and how the experience affected him. His story has been edited for brevity. This story originally aired on On the Record on October 21, 2016.

The story of comedian Trevor Noah’s illegal birth, the haunted life of horror writer Shirley Jackson, a graphic novel with a deaf heroine. We’ve got books suitable for both the insatiable bibliophile and the reluctant reader in your life, perfect to read over the holidays, to give as gifts, or to share among friends. First up, Deborah Taylor of the Enoch Pratt Free Library and her view of the best books of 2016 for adults. Then Miriam DesHarnais, a research and instruction librarian at Towson University, with picks for young people. 

Courtesy of Holistic Life Foundation

A nonprofit called the Holistic Life Foundation has been bringing mindfulness, yoga, and meditation into Baltimore public schools for nearly 15 years. Suspensions and detentions appear to have dropped as a result, and some kids have really taken the practice to heart. We hear from the co-founder of the Holistic Life Foundation, a student who has since become a teacher in the program, and a researcher who studies school-based mindfulness programs. 

Last summer, Governor Larry Hogan canceled funding for Baltimore’s long-awaited east-west light rail system, the Red Line. Soon after, he announced the city would instead receive $135 million for a revamped transit system. It’s called BaltimoreLink; it has many components, one of which is a redesign of the entire bus system with 12 new high-frequency routes. That part is called CityLink. In the year since the announcement, the Maryland Transit Administration has released a draft of the bus plan and then revised it based on more than 1,000 suggestions from riders. The new bus system is slated to be completely underway by next summer. Paul Comfort, administrator of the Maryland Transit Administration, joins us to discuss BaltimoreLink.

Today we discuss music and the mind with a man who is an expert in both. Dr. Richard Kogan is a psychiatrist as well as a world-renowned concert pianist. He is known for his presentations on the psychology of the great composers--presentations that are half lecture and half recital, with Dr. Kogan illustrating his points by playing passages of music. Dr. Kogan is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Weill-Cornell Medical Center in New York City, where he is Artistic Director of the Music and Medicine Program. He will be performing at Goucher College tomorrow, and with the BSO on Sunday. 

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With commercial drones on the rise and the skies becoming more crowded, what are researchers doing to prevent mid-air collisions? That’s the focus of the recipient of this year’s Outstanding Young Engineer Award in Maryland; he’ll tell us about his research. 

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Donald Trump campaigned on promises to make it easier to drill for oil and burn coal. He pledged to leave only “tidbits” of the Environmental Protection Agency in place, and to pull the U.S. out of international climate treaties. “We’re going to cancel the Paris Climate Agreement," he said last May, "and stop all payments of U.S. tax dollars to U.N. global warming programs.” Today we hear from two University of Maryland experts: First, we talk with Robert Orr, head of the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland, College Park. He’s also senior advisor to the United Nations on climate change. Then Donald Boesch, president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, joins us. 

Now another installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series! Today, on Veterans Day, Marine Corps veteran Rich Blake shares a 2010 story from the Iraq War and a moment that could have been his last. It has been edited for brevity. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast--all at stoopstorytelling.com

Courtesy of Girl Problem Records

What it’s like to be a woman in the contemporary punk music scene? Producer Andrea Appleton speaks to two Baltimore musicians: Shawna Potter, frontwoman for the band War on Women, and Madi Shapiro, vocalist and guitarist for Wet Brain. Madi Shapiro also runs a feminist DIY music label based in Baltimore called "Girl Problem Records". On Friday, Girl Problem will release its third compilation, titled Justice. The record release show will feature War On Women, Rukut, No Way! and  two Baltimore hip hop acts, Toyomansi and Phizzals. The show will be at the 5th Dimension, 405 W. Franklin St. 

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What does Donald Trump’s victory mean here in Maryland? Behind the Democrat vote totals in Maryland, what can we read into where Trump found support here? How did the presidential election affect down-ballot races? What was the effect of the state’s record-breaking early voter turnout? Todd Eberly, Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at St. Mary’s College of Maryland joins us. And we speak with Maryland Public Television political reporter Charles Robinson

Baltimore is in the midst of the fifth annual Charm City Fringe Festival. As the name implies, this may be unlike any theatre you’ve seen. Events include a one-man performance of the epic war film Apocalypse Now, an absurdist game show, and a play called Piper Bidet: Bathroom Detective. The festival runs through Sunday at a variety of venues. Charm City Fringe Festival co-founder and president Zach Michel sets the stage for us. And Chad Short, a performer in a Fringe Festival play called Yo, You Be Trippin’ explains how the play, an unusual take on the history of LSD, came to be.

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Many people in the Baltimore region have a tough time keeping a roof over their heads. Rents have increased sharply in Baltimore in recent years, with no comparable rise in incomes. As a result, fully a third of Baltimore City residents pay more than half of their income for housing, according to a recent Abell Foundation report. We discuss a ballot initiative that may have escaped your notice in this dramatic election season: Question J on the Baltimore City ballot. It would establish what is known as an “affordable housing trust fund.” How would that work? How would it differ from the city’s current inclusionary housing program? How have similar efforts worked in other cities? Rachel Cohen, a freelance journalist and senior writing fellow at the monthly The American Prospect, joins us. Last week, In These Times published Rachel’s feature on affordable housing ballot initiatives, including the one in Baltimore.

Time for another installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. Annette March-Grier tells us what it was like to grow up in a funeral home, and how her unusual upbringing influenced her life. Her family opened Roberta’s House nine years ago as a community-based nonprofit that aims to address the grief of high-risk families and youth in Baltimore City. November is Children’s Grief Awareness Month. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast--all at stoopstorytelling.com

Courtesy of Thread's Facebook page

Thread, the nonprofit known for constructing extreme support groups for troubled kids, is branching out into a Conversation Thread, sewing strangers together across Baltimore. We’ll talk to Thread’s founder, Sarah Hemminger, and one of the new participants, Imhotep Simba of Concerned Black Men National.

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What does our newfound ability to handle vast amounts of data mean for the future of medicine? Healthcare is likely to become more tailored to the individual. This has become known as ‘precision medicine.’ What will it mean for our health?

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Maryland has too many deer. They cause tens of thousands of car accidents every year and over-browsing by hungry deer damages native ecosystems. The state typically tries to keep the population down through hunting. But some animal-rights advocates believe wildlife managers should explore other methods. We hear from Brian Eyler, Deer Project Leader at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and Enid Feinberg, president of the Baltimore County nonprofit Wildlife Rescue, Inc. She spearheaded a deer sterilization projects in the county.

Library of Congress

By the time Maryland got around to ending slavery, 152 years ago next week, the Confederacy was within months of collapsing, black people in the District of Columbia had been free more than two years  and President Lincoln had declared emancipation in the South more than a year and a half earlier. What took Maryland so long? Historian C.R. Gibbs explains how Maryland’s elites split over what course to follow, how heroic fighting by black soldiers in the Union army affected public opinion, and, once a new state constitution to abolish slavery was put to referendum, how close the vote was.

Johns Hopkins Medicine

What does it mean to “eat the rainbow”? Why do nutritionists crusade for eating more fiber? We speak to Lynda McIntyre, a clinical dietitian specialist with Johns Hopkins Medicine and a nutrition cancer specialist at Sibley Hospital in Washington, about the power of diet in achieving good health. She’ll be discussing "Power Foods" and "Meatless Mondays" at the Johns Hopkins' annual Woman’s Journey conference next week.

Jimmie/Flickr via Creative Commons

Fall is here and the school year is well under way. But some parents don’t have to worry about packing a lunch or getting their kids to the bus stop on time. They are homeschoolers, and nationwide, they’re a growing demographic. In Maryland, there are about 27,000 homeschooled kids. What motivates parents to homeschool? Is homeschooling possible in households with working parents? What are the benefits, and the challenges? 

Time for the third installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. Today Congressman Elijah Cummings tells the story of the integration of Riverside Park Pool in south Baltimore, and how the experience affected him. His story has been edited for brevity. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and the Stoop podcast at stoopstorytelling.com

yvonne slazar/Flickr via Creative Commons

We explore an unorthodox approach to preventing violence in the community. We’ll talk to Maryland shock-trauma surgeon Dr. Carnell Cooper, who for two decades has been intervening in the emergency room, as victims of violence recover, to help them change the patterns that led to that violence.  "We have an opportunity to save their lives," he says. "In fact we have maybe even a little bit of an obligation to try and do something beyond just patching them up.” Then, Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen fills us in on plans to expand the city’s Safe Streets outreach program into numerous city hospitals, beginning with Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Jack Lyons/Flickr via Creative Commons

This weekend the Maryland Historical Society is screening "Maryland on Film III," two and a half hours of footage exploring the geography of our state. The screening includes some archival gems: a 1961 meditation on screen painting; a documentary about Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium; and “Little Castles,” a 1997 film about Formstone, the fake stone found on so many Baltimore rowhouses. Joe Tropea, Digital Projects Coordinator at the Maryland Historical Society, joins us to discuss the event. And Skizz Cyzyk, director of “Little Castles,” fills us in on the history of Formstone. 

Google Maps

A long-awaited $23--and-a-half million-dollar development broke ground in East Baltimore last month. If all goes as planned, a dilapidated former pumping station will soon transform into the Baltimore Food Hub, a central location for food endeavors ranging from an urban farm to commercial production kitchens to a market. The Food Hub is a project of American Communities Trust, a national community development organization that works in low-income communities. China Boak Terrell, the CEO of American Communities Trust, joins us to talk about the Hub. 

GQ, The Nation, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, Esquire -- just a few of the publications that publish drawings by the celebrated political illustrator and satirist Steve Brodner. Brodner will be in Baltimore Thursday night to deliver a lecture at the Maryland Institute College of Art at 7pm, at the Fred Lazarus Center. He joins us to discuss what it's like to cover the current presidential campaign. 

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Most of us have read or heard about the spread of the Zika virus: the serious birth defects, like microcephaly, that can result if a pregnant woman becomes infected, and the pressure to develop a vaccine against the virus. What many of us may not have given any thought to is whether such a vaccine would be tested on pregnant women. Because for the most part, pregnant women are not included in clinical drug trials for fear of the potential harm to the fetus. As a result, scientists just don’t know how safe most medications are for pregnant women. A group of bioethicists is pushing for change. They argue that neglecting to research the safety of drugs in pregnant women is unethical.  Carleigh Krubiner, a Faculty Research Scholar at the Johns Hopkins’ Berman Institute for Bioethics, joins us to explain. 

Julia Sergina/Flickr via Creative Commons

Do classical musicians have a role to play in advancing social justice? We talk to composer Judah Adashi, who is on the faculty of the Peabody Institute. Adashi is teaching a new workshop at the Peabody on Art and Activism, and he frequently takes on social issues in his work. He talks with us about art, activism, and the delicate balance between social critique and propaganda. Then: Roberto Busó-García heads a new Johns Hopkins film fund with a special focus on Baltimore. He joins us to tell us about it. Those who make the cut for the Saul Zaentz Innovation Fund in Film and Media get mentoring from experts in the industry, as well as cash, in some cases. The fellows include artists with in-depth experience and some who have never made a film. Have a great idea? You’re eligible.

Julia Sergina/Flickr via Creative Commons

Roberto Busó-García heads a new Johns Hopkins film fund with a special focus on Baltimore. He joins us to tell us about it. Those who make the cut for the Saul Zaentz Innovation Fund in Film and Media get mentoring from experts in the industry, as well as cash, in some cases. The fellows include artists with in-depth experience and some who have never made a film. Have a great idea? You’re eligible. 

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