Anirban Basu | WYPR

Anirban Basu

Host, Morning Economic Report

Anirban Basu, Chariman Chief Executive Officer of Sage Policy Group (SPG), is one of the Mid-Atlantic region's leading economic consultants.  Prior to founding SPG he was Chairman and CEO of Optimal Solutions Group, a company he co-founded and which continues to operate.  Anirban has also served as Director of Applied Economics and Senior Economist for RESI, where he used his extensive knowledge of the Mid-Atlantic region to support numerous clients in their strategic decision-making processes.  Clients have included the Maryland Department of Transportation, St. Paul Companies, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Players Committee and the Martin O'Malley mayoral campaign.

He is the author of numerous regional publications including the Mid-Atlantic Economic Quarterly and Outlook Maryland and is routinely asked to contribute to local media, including on his radio show on WTMD, 89.7 FM/Baltimore and here on WYPR's Morning Economic Forecast.  Anirban completed his graduate work in mathematical economics at the University of Maryland.  He earned a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University in 1992. His Bachelors in Foreign Service is from Georgetown University and was earned in 1990.  He is currently working toward his J.D. at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

One of the advantages that public sector workers have over many private sectors workers are defined benefit retirement plans. Unlike defined contribution retirement plans, which specify how much money will go into a retirement plan, defined benefit plans identify the specific benefit that will be payable to employees at retirement. 

Chinese Imports

Dec 21, 2016
Robert Scoble/flickr

Anirban Basu discusses the impact of China's manufacturing and export centers on American firms.

Energy Production

Dec 20, 2016
USFWS/Joshua Winchell

Anirban Basu on energy production, which he calls "one of the most dynamic aspects of the U.S. economy."

The Urban Revival

Dec 19, 2016

As indicated by an article written by Adam Bednar of the Daily Record, the impending death of America’s suburbs may have been greatly exaggerated.  For years, urbanists have trumpeted the prospective rebound of the American city after decades of out-migration. 

A wave of populist fervor is washing across much of the advanced world, and at the root of this emerging political dynamic are economic trends.  As indicated by a McKinsey Global Institute Report, with the exception of a brief hiatus during the 1970s, much of the past 70 years has been associated with buoyant global economic and employment growth. 

Is 62 Right for You?

Dec 15, 2016
Joao Vicente/flickr

The age of 62 is becoming an increasingly popular age for retirement.  One of the reasons for this is obvious.  It’s the earliest age at which Social Security beneficiaries can begin collecting payments.  Most recipients leap at the opportunity to access those funds as soon as possible.  As indicated by writer Maurie Blackman, this helps explain why 62 also represents the median retirement age for Americans.  

Global economic growth is expected to pick up faster than previously thought in coming months due to expected tax cuts and public spending in the U.S. – this according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.  In its most recent economic outlook report, the OECD estimates that global growth will accelerate from 2.9 percent this year to 3.3 percent in 2017 and 3.6 in 2018. 

Over time, women have made significant progress in cracking and collapsing various glass ceilings.  One of the final remaining glass ceilings is in the world of investment, including in the U.S. 

As indicated by writer Josh Mitchell, the federal government is on pace to forgive at least $108 billion in student debt in coming years – this as an increasing number of borrowers seek assistance in paying down their loans.  The result will be reduced revenues to finance higher education going forward. 

The Top 400 Club

Dec 12, 2016

It is often said that the rich are getting richer.  New data indicate that the really really rich have become much much wealthier.  According to recently released data from the Internal Revenue Service, total income reported on the top 400 tax returns rose 20 percent in 2014.  

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