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Associated Press

The Associated Press is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering, supplying a steady stream of news to its members, international subscribers and commercial customers. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, it's a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members.

P. Kenneth Burns

A man whose murder conviction was recently vacated after his story was at the center of a popular podcast will remain jailed while he awaits a new trial.

Baltimore Circuit Judge Martin Welch on Wednesday denied Adnan Syed's request to be released from jail primarily because there is a pending appeal from the prosecutor's office.

The chief spokesman for Baltimore police insists that a trial program in which a manned plane with cameras flies over the city and feeds information to law enforcement was not a secret.

Aaron Webb / Flickr / Creative Commons

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is pledging at least $1 million in grants to help groups that serve victims of sexual assault in Baltimore after the Justice Department found the police department's responses to sexual assault "grossly inadequate."

The Republican governor said Thursday that the money represents immediate action to improve services to victims.

Aaron Webb / Flickr / Creative Commons

Authorities say 12 people have been arrested while protesting a police conference in Baltimore.

Dozens of protesters gathered Sunday outside a hotel, where the Maryland Fraternal Order of Police is holding its biennial conference this week.

Baltimore County police say they asked Facebook to suspend a woman's Facebook and Instagram accounts during a standoff because people commenting on videos of the law enforcement operation were encouraging her not to comply with orders from officers.

Baltimore Police

A friend of Freddie Gray, the black man who died from injuries suffered in police custody, testified that an officer on trial in the death told him to leave as Gray was being arrested.

P. Kenneth Burns

A neurosurgeon has testified at the trial of a Baltimore police officer facing criminal charges after the arrest and death of a young black man that the man suffered an incomplete spinal cord injury and could still move his head and talk.

P. Kenneth Burns

After spending 16 years in prison, a man convicted of murder who was at the center of the podcast "Serial" has won a new trial in Baltimore.

The Baltimore Police Department has updated its use of force policy to mandate officers to immediately render aid if someone in custody complains of an injury a year after an arrestee suffered a critical spinal injury in a police van but was initially denied medical treatment.

P. Kenneth Burns

  A Baltimore judge is poised to deliver his verdict in the murder trial of an officer who drove the police van where a black arrestee's neck was broken, triggering some of the worst riots the city has ever seen.

Caesar Goodson was charged with murder, manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office.

Prosecutors are expected to call more witnesses Monday in their murder case against the police van driver in the death of a 25-year-old black man who died after his neck was broken in the back of the van.

Officer Caesar Goodson faces second-degree murder, manslaughter and other charges stemming from the death of Freddie Gray.

His trial began Thursday and the state has called 11 witnesses.

In the second day of a Baltimore police van driver's murder trial, prosecutors have called to the witness stand a doctor who did an autopsy on a man who died after his neck was broken in the back of the van.

Officer Caesar Goodson is charged with second-degree murder, manslaughter and other offenses stemming from Freddie Gray's death. Gray died April 19, a week after his spine was snapped in Goodson's van.

The state on Friday called its eighth witness, assistant medical examiner Carol Allan, who ruled Gray's death a homicide.

The Baltimore police officer facing the most serious charge stemming from the death of a 25-year-old black man whose neck was broken in the back of a transport wagon has waived his right to a jury trial. Instead, 46-year-old Officer Caesar Goodson decided Monday to put his fate in the hands of a judge. Goodson faces second-degree "depraved-heart" murder, manslaughter, assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment charges stemming from Freddie Gray's April 19, 2015 death.

Two Baltimore City School Police officers have been charged with second-degree assault and misconduct in office after cellphone video surfaced showing one of them slapping and kicking a teen at a school while a second officer stood by.

Two Baltimore police officers charged in the Freddie Gray case are opposing the state's motion to delay their trials until appellate courts decide whether another officer can be compelled to testify against them.

A Maryland appeals court has issued a temporary order that says a police officer doesn't have to testify against a colleague who is going on trial in the death of Freddie Gray.

The court says it issued a temporary decision because it wants to give prosecutors time to respond to whether Officer William Porter should be forced to testify at Officer Caesar Goodson's second-degree murder trial. Prosecutors want Porter to testify.

A Baltimore judge is postponing for several days the January trial of a police officer charged with second-degree murder in the death of Freddie Gray.

The Maryland Judiciary issued a statement Monday saying Officer Caesar Goodson's trial will begin Jan. 11 instead of Jan. 6.

A Baltimore jury is deliberating again, a day after announcing a deadlock in case of the first police officer to stand trial over the death of Freddie Gray.

There will be settlement talks between the Housing Authority of Baltimore City and 11 women who say maintenance men demanded sex before making repairs.

The Baltimore Sun reports that Monday, a judge ordered a settlement conference for Jan. 12 after attorneys for both the plaintiffs and defense asked the court to intervene.

Prosecutors are dropping charges against 16 activists arrested after an hours-long sit-in at Baltimore's City Hall.

State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby's office announced Thursday that the charges were "abated by arrest."

Baltimore's housing commissioner says federal officials are investigating allegations that some maintenance men demanded sexual favors in exchange for repairs at city housing projects.

  

Republican Gov. Larry Hogan is forming a commission to study legislative redistricting reform in Maryland.

Hogan signed an executive order on Thursday to create the panel.

State officials say Maryland's five casinos generated $91.4 million in revenue in June.

The State Treasurer says the three major national bond rating agencies have given Maryland bonds top ratings.

Health officials are warning Baltimore residents that drug overdose deaths linked to a highly potent chemical commonly used to lace heroin are up 178 percent from last year.

Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby wants a judge to order a separate trial for two of the six officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is celebrating its 10th anniversary.

The Maryland Emergency Management Agency says federal officials have denied the state's request for a disaster declaration stemming from civil unrest in Baltimore after the police-involved death of Freddie Gray.

Spokesman Chas Eby told The Associated Press in an email Friday that the Federal Emergency Management Agency has sent Maryland an initial denial of a request the state submitted last month. Such denials can be appealed.

A disaster declaration would allow public agencies or individuals, or both, to seek reimbursement for disaster-related costs.

The Maryland Democratic Party has named a new interim executive director.

D. Bruce Poole, the party chairman, announced in an email Friday that Pat Murray has been chosen to work on an interim basis.

The Maryland Transit Administration authority has unveiled a less costly MARC pass that can be used on week days only after riders complained about a hefty increase in the fares for seven-day passes.

The MTA announced the new plan Thursday at the monthly meeting of the MARC Riders Advisory Council in Washington.  The original plan would have raised the cost of a seven-day pass to travel between Baltimore and Washington from $52.50 to $80. The new passes will cost $60 for five days.

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