Fraser Smith

Fraser Smith has been in the news business for over 30 years.  He began his reportorial career with the Jersey Journal, a daily New Jersey newspaper and then moved on to the Providence Journal in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1969 Fraser won a prestigious American Political Science Association Public Affairs Fellowship, which enabled him to devote a year to graduate study at Yale University.  In 1977, Fraser was hired away by The Baltimore Sun where in 1981, he moved to the newspaper's Washington bureau to focus on policy problems and their everyday effect on Marylanders.  In 1983, he became the Sun's chief political reporter.

During his career as a reporter, Fraser was the recipient of numerous journalism awards: from UPI New England in 1973, from AP New England in 1974 and 1975, from Roy W. Howard in 1975, from Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association in 1981, and from Sigma Delta Chi in 1986.  His Sun series on lead paint poisoning, which he wrote with his wife, Eileen Canzian, won first place and best of show honors in 1987 from the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association.  Between 1999 and 2003, he has served as an editorial writer and columnist for the Sun.


Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about the Baltimore police union's dissatisfaction with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake.


Fraser Smith and Andrew Green, of the Baltimore Sun. talk about the crowded Democratic primary for Baltimore's mayor, just hours before incumbent Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announces she will not seek re-election.


Fraser Smith and Bryan Sears, of The Daily Record, discuss the legacy of former governor Marvin Mandel, who died Sunday.

Fraser Smith and Mileah Kromer, of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center at Goucher College, discuss the latest polling from Iowa and what that means for Governor Martin O'Malley's presidential chances.


Here’s the other good reason for banning racial and other profiling. Atty. Gen. Brian Frosh reminds us that profiling is counterproductive.