Jamyla Krempel | WYPR

Jamyla Krempel

Digital Producer

Jamyla came to us from Delmarva Public Radio, where she was a reporter and local host for All Things Considered.  Thanks to funding from local foundations and members of the WYPR Board of Directors, she's helping us produce "The Lines Between Us." At Delmarva Public Radio, Jamyla was awarded "2011 Best News Series" by the Chesapeake Associated Press Broadcasters Association for her look at racial inequality in Somerset County’s government, and she's covered redistricting, same-sex marriage, and the depictions of minorities on television.  She also led an NPR-guided revamp of the Delmarva Public Radio website.

Ways to Connect

Eric Seymour, Esperanza Center-Catholic Charities of Baltimore

It’s been a year since news reports started covering the large numbers of children crossing the U.S. border from Central American countries. It’s estimated that more than 55,000 unaccompanied minors have crossed the border since that time. And since January 2014, more than 2,800 minors have been placed with relatives or new caretakers in Maryland. In July, we examined why these children were coming to Maryland and we looked at the options that were on the table to house them. But now we want to ask what’s the next step for these children who are living in the state?

Center Stage

J. Wynn Rousuck reviews the musical Next to Normal, which continues at Center Stage through November 16. 

Jamyla Kay

This morning, we begin a series called 'Living Questions,' a monthly series of conversations about issues surrounding religion, theology and ethics. We’re partnering with the Institute for Christian and Jewish Studies, an organization that for nearly 30 years has worked to cultivate religious literacy and inter-faith understanding. Joining Tom in the studio is Dr. Homayra Ziad, Dr. Benjamin Sax and Dr. Heather Miller Rubens.

Richard Anderson

It started as a show called Feeling Electric. In 1998, when the playwright and lyricist Brian Yorkey saw a TV news story about electroconvulsive therapy, he suggested it as the topic of a brief musical to his friend and fellow Columbia University student, Tom Kitt.  They wrote a draft of a musical inspired by the story for a musical theater workshop in New York. Ten years later, it arrived off-Broadway, where it promptly failed. That’s usually the end of the story for musicals, but it wasn’t for this one, which evolved into a hit show called Next to Normal, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2010, and in 2011, was nominated for 11 Tony Awards, winning three. David Schweitzer is an internationally acclaimed director of plays, musicals and opera who has returned to Center Stage with a new production of Next to Normal. He joins Tom in the studio, along with  a member of this engaging and compelling cast, Kally Duling. She plays the role of Natalie.

A. Currell / Flickr / Creative Commons

It’s been three months since leadership in Baltimore City’s Liquor License Board was overhauled. Former city circuit court judge Thomas Ward was appointed as Chairman of the Board, which is a state agency funded in the City budget. Governor Martin O’Malley appointed attorney Dana P. Moore to be one of the three commissioners, and retired City Circuit Court Judge Thomas Ward to be commissioner and chair.  The third commissioner, Harvey Jones, stayed. Sheilah spoke with Chairman Ward yesterday and he said before he was appointed, he was ‘out of touch with what was happening’ with the Board. We hear more from him, and from Fern Shen, editor of Baltimore Brew. Also in the studio is Becky Witt, attorney with the Community Law Center. She also blogs about the Liquor Board at their blog, “Booze News.” 

Crofton Maryland History Facebook page

If I ask you, “What was the first planned community in Maryland?” more than likely the first place that comes to your mind is: Columbia. Residents began moving into Columbia’s 10 villages in 1967. But, there is a planned community that predates Columbia. People began calling Crofton home in 1964.

"I Love Lucy: Live on Stage"

Tom Hall and J. Wynn Rousuck discuss the Hippodrome's production of "I Love Lucy: Live on Stage."

Artondra Hall/flickr

Those Old Bay chips aren't just for snacking! In honor of Old Bay's 75th anniversary, Chef Sascha Wolhandler, co-owner of Sascha's 527 Cafe, tells us how to spice up crab dishes. 

Brendan Ross / Flickr / Creative Commons

We’re just two and a half weeks from Election Day.  Just as voters across the state are choosing a new executive, voters in some counties are choosing new executive leadership. This morning we’re going to focus on races in Frederick County – which is putting into effect an entirely new form of government – and in Anne Arundel County. WYPR reporter Kenneth Burns joins Sheilah in the studio. And, with us on the line from his office at the Frederick News-Post is Cliff Cumber, the News-Post’s Editorial Page Editor.

Brett Gullborg/Flickr/Creative Commons

Well, for a while, we held out the hope that tomorrow would be a day for Orioles baseball. The Kansas City Royals had different ideas, so there won't be a game tomorrow. But that's not to say that Camden Yards won't still be a busy place. The 14th Annual Baltimore Running Festival kicks off at 7 a.m. tomorrow morning with a full marathon, followed by a Half Marathon that launches from the Inner Harbor at 8:45 a.m.

University of Maryland BioPark

In proton radiation therapy, protons deliver precise beams of radiation to a tumor. The first cancer patient received proton therapy in the 1950s, but only in the 1990s did the therapy make its way into a hospital. Advocates of proton therapy say that it can minimize side effects and that it offers hope to patients who have few or no treatment options left.  Proton centers are opening around the country, and in a year, a proton center will open here in Baltimore at the University of Maryland BioPark. Minesh Mehta, the medical director of the Maryland Proton Treatment Center joins Sheilah by phone. We also hear from Dr. Mehta's patient Daryl Marciszewski, who received proton therapy in Chicago. 

Everyman Theatre

Megan Anderson is a member of the resident company of the Everyman Theatre in Baltimore.  Recently named “Best Actress” by the Baltimore City Paper, she is starring in Everyman’s latest production, the Baltimore premiere of "Grounded," by George Brant. It’s a ripped-from-the-headlines affair about a former F-16 pilot who is now flying drones from a remote location in Nevada.  It’s also a tour-de-force for Megan Anderson, or any actor, for that matter, as she is the one and only actor in the play.  "Grounded" is in previews tonight and tomorrow.  It opens at the Everyman Theatre on Friday.

P. KENNETH BURNS / WYPR

Although City Offices are closed today, one person likely to be working anyway is Eric Costello.  He’s just completed his first week as the city councilman representing Baltimore’s 11th District,  which includes Mount Vernon, Druid Heights, Poppleton and Federal Hill.

Brookhaven National Labaratory/Flickr/Creative Commons

Teachers, education advocates, even the White House champion STEM education, and its role in creating a competitive U.S. workforce. But how do we ensure that the next generation of scientists, technology professionals, engineers and mathematicians is diverse? Sheilah is joined in the studio by Keisha Reed, digital strategist and contributor to the website Technical.ly Baltimore.

Katie Ellen Simmons-Barth

Maryland Morning theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck reviews "Venus in Fur" at Rep Stage in Columbia. The production runs through October 19.

Friends of Great Kids Farm

Good food grown by great kids. Tom Hall visits Great Kids Farm on Route 40 in Catonsville.  The farm is part of the Baltimore City Schools.   When he visited the farm a couple of years ago, food from the farm was available in about 14 schools. This year, the salad bars of nearly 60 schools will feature produce grown at the farm by students, under the tutelage of a farm educator, a farm chef, and farm manager Greg Strella, who joins Tom at the farm. Tom also speaks with Chrissa Carlson, the executive director of the Friends of Great Kids Farm. DeAndre 'Dre' Lloyd is a senior at Edmondson-Westside High School and he tells us about his experience growing and learning about the produce.

Henry Kay, Maryland Transit Administration

The latest obstacle on the road to the $2.9 billion “Red Line” light rail project is a lawsuit filed by 25 plaintiffs who own 20 properties on North Freemont Avenue in the West Baltimore neighborhood of Poppleton.  Plans call for a tunnel under their houses.   

The 14 mile project will run from East Baltimore out to parts of Baltimore County. The plaintiffs filed suit in Baltimore City Circuit Court.  They contend the plans for a tunnel have made their properties  worthless. They’re asking for $22 million in damages and an injunction to stop the state from going forward with the project. 

Bryan P. Sears, The Daily Record’s business writer, covered the lawsuit last week.  He joins Sheilah in the studio.  

Saire Elizabeth/Flickr

Sorry we don't have the audio for you today, due to technical difficulties we were not able to archive this segment. We'll be back on November 7 with more movies!

Ann Hornaday, movie critic for The Washington Post and Jed Dietz, director of the Maryland Film Festival, join Tom to tell us about the latest films to check out. 

Blind Nomad/flickr

Today, Maryland becomes the 18th state, plus the District of Columbia, to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana. Decriminalize, not legalize.  People found to be in possession of 10 grams of marijuana or less will get a citation and a civil fine instead of a criminal penalty.

On Tuesday, Sheilah spoke with Greg Shipley, director of communications for the Maryland State Police, to understand how this new law will change one police force. Then, we hear from Rachelle Yeung, legislative analyst for the Marijuana Policy Project, which advocates for drug reform and tracks marijuana policies across the U.S.

Chesapeake Center for Youth Development

Hundreds, if not thousands, of teenagers in the Baltimore region are essentially raising themselves, with parents too pre-occupied to provide the support they need, hit with pressure to get immersed in crime, or drugs or truancy. Dozens of human-services organizations are trying to help, but they face challenges, also – to find the revenue to support what they do, to coordinate with government agencies as policies and theories change.

So it makes sense to just stop for a few minutes and salute a non-profit that has been working with at-risk youth for forty years.  The Chesapeake Center for Youth Development was founded in 1974 – and for more than 30 years of those four decades, Ivan Leshinsky has been at its head. Leshinsky joins Sheilah in the studio.

jessrow.wordpress.com

Jess Row's debut novel, "Your Face in Mine," is set in Baltimore and the settings around town in which this provocative story take place will no doubt be familiar.

So will some of the people, including a few employees of a local public radio station.  What won’t be familiar is the imaginative premise of this very insightful novel. One of the protagonists, Martin Lipkin, is white and Jewish.  Before the novel begins, he has self- diagnosed himself with what he calls Racial Identity Dysphoria Syndrome, and he has undergone racial reassignment surgery to become African American.  As his story is revealed, author Jess Row tackles the issues of racial identity, white privilege, and the notion of starting your life over again as a completely new person.  Mr. Row will be talking about his book tomorrow night at Red Emma’s bookstore.  He joins Tom Hall by phone from New York.

Sandstein/Creative Commons

    

For some, Alan Alda will always be Hawkeye Pierce, the sarcastic but tender-hearted surgeon bedeviling his U.S. army superiors during the Korean War.  The final episode of season 11 of M*A*S*H in 1983, which Alda directed as well as starred in, was the most-watched television broadcast ever until the 2010 SuperBowl.

Teresa Castracane

Maryland Morning theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck reviews "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company in Baltimore. The production runs through Oct. 12.

Nv8200p/Creative Commons

Every year, the Maryland Humanities Council chooses a book which we are all encouraged to read, and to discuss at events that the Council organizes around the state.  It’s kind of like a state-wide book club.  This year, they’ve chosen a memoir by Reyna Grande. She joins Tom in the studio. 

The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University

The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University has a new dean. Fred Bronstein began his tenure as the Peabody’s head honcho in June.  He comes to the revered music school from the world of professional orchestras.  He was the President and CEO of the St. Louis Symphony for six years, having held similar posts with orchestras in Omaha and Dallas.  He takes the helm of the country’s oldest music conservatory at a crucial time for American orchestras and the schools that train their players.

Jamyla Kay

We’re going to the dogs! Ahead of their appearance this weekend at the Baltimore Book Festival, author Michael Muller tells us how his bond with Mirabelle the Boston Terrier inspired a children’s book series. The 19th annual Baltimore Book Festival starts at noon today. It will be the largest one yet with hundreds of events, panels and authors at sites throughout the Inner Harbor.

It’s been 6 months since the World Health Organization learned of an outbreak of the Ebola virus in the West African country of Guinea.  Officially, at least 5,800 cases of Ebola have been reported to the WHO; about half --2,800 people -- have died.

This week, the WHO said that unless better controls are put into place, as many as 21,000 people could be infected by early November.  One of the control measures that people are undoubtedly looking to for hope is a vaccine. Sheilah talks with the director of the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Vaccine Development, Dr. Myron Levine, Professor of Medicine. Dr. Levine and his colleagues are working on getting an Ebola vaccine field-tested.

Flickr user/ Maryland Gov Pics

It doesn’t happen very often that a Baltimore City Council member vacates their seat. It did happen last month, when 11th District Councilman William Cole was appointed President and CEO of the Baltimore Development Corporation.

Cole was a member of the Baltimore City Council for 7 years, and now 15 applicants are vying for his seat, which represents more than a dozen neighborhoods. The City’s Charter has a process for filling the seat and Sheilah talks about the process with WYPR reporter Kenneth Burns. We also hear from Cole on what it's like to represent the 11th District, and we learn about major issues in the 11th District from Janet Allen, President of the Heritage Crossing Resident Association.   

Richard Anderson

 

Music, madness, Mozart! Theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck reviews "Amadeus" at Center Stage in Baltimore. The production runs from September 13 to October 12. 

arnoKath/Flickr/Creative Commons

It's something we encounter each and every day, but perhaps pay attention to only subconsciously: typography. When you compose a document on your computer, how much time do you spend deciding what typeface to use? Do you use different styles for different kinds of documents? To help us understand why some typefaces work well and others do not, Tom talks with MICA's Ellen Lupton and typographer Tal Leming.

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