Joel McCord

Joel McCord is a trumpet player who learned early in life that thatâââââ

Jonna McKone

Maryland began digging out from under an historic snowfall yesterday with shovels, snow blowers and in one case, even a dustpan. 

Just because the recent unseasonably warm temperatures might lure you to the water, the Maryland Natural Resources Police and the Coast Guard warn you better be careful. 

Back in the 80s, the Environmental Protection Agency began requiring power companies to install "scrubbers" in the smokestacks of their coal fired plants to capture pollutants before they got into the air. And that did a reasonable job of cleaning up the air we breathe.

But it damaged the water we drink because all that lead and arsenic and selenium trapped in the smokestacks had to go somewhere. It went, unregulated, into thousands of miles of rivers and streams, making power plants the worst water polluters in the nation.


    

Joel McCord and Karen Hosler, of the WYPR news team, discuss Baltimore's loss of statewide power since the glory days when Marvin Mandel was Governor and William Donald Schaefer was mayor.

  It’s a summertime tradition, diving into the nearest creek to cool off on a muggy afternoon. Maybe you want to remain blissfully ignorant of what’s in that water. But the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, in league with three community colleges, has set out to let you know. Not to scare you, but to educate you.

After three decades in prison, 56-year-old Mark Chase recently got his first paycheck, the first car he hadn’t stolen and a job that might give him a good life.  


  State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby announced today that all six police officers involved in the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray will face criminal charges.

  For the musicians of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, this may have been the ultimate, “Hey, kids, let’s put on a show” moment. They whipped together a free, lunch-time concert on the plaza in front of the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Wednesday in barely 24 hours.

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president, died at 7:22 a.m. April 15th, 150 years ago. That much is certain. But trying to piece together the story of his murder and the escape of assassin John Wilkes Booth is something like that college stunt where someone runs into a classroom, fires a cap pistol and runs out and the professor asks what happened. 


The water is clearer, the underwater grasses are coming back and so are the oysters, if only incrementally, according to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s latest report on America’s largest estuary.

Pollution is declining and the dead zones are shrinking. And that’s all to the good. But two of the bay’s iconic species—crabs and rockfish—are in trouble. And the scores for other indicators, such as wetlands, toxics and nitrogen pollution did not change.

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