John Racanelli | WYPR

John Racanelli

Host, A Blue View

As chief executive officer, John Racanelli leads a team of 600 full and part-time employees and 1,000 volunteers in pursuing the National Aquarium’s mission to inspire conservation of the world’s aquatic treasures.  More than 1.5 million people annually visit the Aquarium’s venue in Baltimore, Maryland, while millions more are touched by the Aquarium’s education programs, outreach activities, social media campaigns and conservation initiatives.

A passionate advocate for the ocean, John strives to drive conservation action worldwide, ensure the success of one of the nation’s leading aquarium enterprises, and fundamentally change the way the world views the ocean and aquatic systems.

John joined the National Aquarium in July 2011 after 10 years as president of Racanelli Partners, Inc. The San Francisco-based consulting firm served the needs of nonprofit leaders nationally and globally, focusing on cultural and conservation organizations including Mission Blue/Sylvia Earle Alliance, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and the Surfrider Foundation.

After co-founding Mission Blue with author and oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle, John assisted her in developing and launching Google Ocean, Google’s most significant enhancement of Google Earth, the most popular earth visualization tool in existence.

Prior to founding his firm, John spent 16 years in leadership positions at U.S. aquariums. He was the first CEO of the Florida Aquarium in Tampa, where he built the facility, team and vision for Tampa Bay’s leading cultural attraction.  He also served for nine years on the leadership team of the world-renowned Monterey Bay Aquarium as its vice president of marketing and development, joining the aquarium a year before its opening. While in college, John began his career as a diver and aquarist, an experience that he credits with giving him great appreciation for the work of everyone on the aquarium team.

Fluent in Spanish, John holds a degree in strategic management from Dominican University of California. He is a SCUBA diver, open-water swimmer, sailor and surfer. His weekly radio show and podcast on WYPR public radio, “A Blue View,” explores important issues related to the aquatic world. John and his family are proud residents of Canton, Baltimore’s historic waterfront district.

Wikipedia

We have five senses; ask any schoolchild and they can rattle them off on the fingers of one hand: hearing, taste, smell, touch and sight.

livescience.com

When it comes to biodiversity, the Amazon is practically unrivaled. Spanning 6.7 million square kilometers, this South American region is twice the size of India and houses at least 10 percent of the world’s known species. Twelve hundred new species of plants and vertebrates were discovered between 1999 and 2009 alone.

Wikipedia

Tridacna gigas, the giant clam of the Indo-Pacific, is the largest bivalve mollusk on Earth and the world's only sun-powered clam. It hosts a thick layer of zooxanthellae in its tissues and gets up to 90 percent of its nutrition from their photosynthesis.

aqua.org

Where does your seafood come from? You may be thinking about your favorite restaurant or your local grocery store. But the fact is, some seafood takes a circuitous route to get from the sea to your plate, and along the way can get a little, well, lost.

www.nationalgeographic.com

Its eye is the size of your head. It lives more than 3,000 feet deep in oceans around the world and is 30 feet long, yet it lacks a backbone. With eight arms and two tentacles, it is the origin of the myth of the Kraken.

www.seafoodwatch.org

We talk a lot about being “sustainable,” but what does it really mean? Tj Tate, director of sustainable seafood at the National Aquarium, is here today to talk about this sometimes misunderstood term, and what it means in the seafood industry.

sanctuaries.noaa.gov

More than 170,000 square miles of U.S. marine and Great Lakes waters are preserved through national marine sanctuaries. There are 14 of them scattered around the country, from Washington State to the Florida Keys, and from Lake Huron to American Samoa.

marylandbiodiversity.com

When it comes to biodiversity of plants and animals, the number of species typically increases as you move from the colder temperate zone to the warm tropics. The epicenter of salamander diversity, however, exists much further from the Equator—in fact, it’s here.

songbirdgarden.com

You may not be able to dance, but you do have rhythm. All humans have rhythm. It is the circadian clock, a 24-hour cycle that regulates our sleep-wake timing and other physiological processes.

birdsinbackyards.net

Perhaps you are familiar with the saying “an albatross around your neck.” This phrase, coined by the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, in his 1798 poem, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, refers to the association of the albatross with bad luck, mishap, struggle and worry.

oceanservice.noaa.gov

Ever feel the tangle of seaweed around your ankle when wading in the water? For many beachgoers, it is enough to send them scrambling for shore.

www.chesapeakebay.net

At $15,000 a pop, a quart of horseshoe crab blood is valuable, but its riches are far greater than a price tag. The crab’s unique blood holds tremendous worth in the medical community—and for each of us.

nationalgeographic.com

If you’ve ever wondered whether it’s possible to make a positive difference for the environment amid all the doom and gloom we hear about every day, the answer is a resounding yes. Need proof? Here it is: The osprey.

sierraclub.org

The East Coast faced a deadly adversary in October 2012: Hurricane Sandy swept through 24 states, leaving over $68 billion of damage in its wake. It was a reminder of just how powerful Mother Nature can be.

typesofsharkshq.com

The great white shark has long been feared as one of the sea’s deadliest apex predators. At an average of 15 feet in length, weighing up to 5,000 pounds and sporting about 300 serrated teeth, it’s no wonder these creatures have a notorious reputation.

zmescience.com

Cascading tendrils of blue-green tentacles and a translucent, neon bell give the Portuguese man-of-war its otherworldly appearance.

Wikipedia

Sharks have earned a nasty reputation for being vicious, human-hungry predators of the seas. The fact that some of them average 15 feet in length, weigh up to 5,000 pounds and have mouths lined with up to 300 razor-sharp teeth doesn’t do much to fight the stigma.

outdoornation.org

For many, summer means cookouts, beach trips, park trips and other kinds of outdoor activities, but for many urban kids, nature's very much an unknown quantity. In fact, the notion of the great outdoors is changing-and with it, what it means to be out in nature.

Wikipedia

For some people this is a life philosophy; for oceanographers, it describes the very dynamics of our global ocean.

aqua.org/blog

Did you know? One out of every three bites of food you eat comes from pollinators. Without them, we wouldn’t have foods like blueberries, apples, chocolate and almonds.

aqua.org/blog

An initiative of the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore, the Healthy Harbor Report Card tracks the progress being made toward a swimmable, fishable future for our Inner Harbor.

In the Mud - 6/2/15

Jun 2, 2015
aqua.org/blog

Don’t be deceived by the desolate look of a mudflat. These areas of mud or sandy mud, which line thousands of miles of Chesapeake Bay shoreline, are hiding a rich variety of life.

aqua.org/blog

With the right gardening strategies, you can create your own certified wildlife habitat around your home or somewhere in your community.

aqua.org/blog

Hidden just beneath the surface of the Inner Harbor in five distinct locations is a new type of garden: an oyster garden.

These installations are the product of the Great Baltimore Oyster Partnership, a collaboration between the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, local businesses and area schools.

aqua.org/blog

Today, little of our planet’s land is dark at night. The starry hubs of cities and ports and vein-like outgrowths of the well-lit suburbs cover the surface of the Earth. The planet may be "a pale blue dot," as Carl Sagan has said; but at night, we're bright. Too bright. 

Wikipedia

You’ve probably heard of the Galapagos Islands, an archipelago of 19 islands deep in the Pacific Ocean. A UNESCO World Heritage site, the Galapagos are 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador, and a world apart from the rest of the planet.

aqua.org/blog

When Captain John Smith first explored the Patapsco River in 1608, it was ringed by natural wetlands that provided habitat to native wildlife and filtered the water. It may be hard to imagine, but before Baltimore became a thriving seaport, the Inner Harbor was likely a vibrant wetland, its surface adorned with green vegetation.

aqua.org/blog

Manatees made headlines this winter when a group of them, including a mother and calf, became marooned in a Florida storm drain and had to be rescued by marine biologists with backhoes and earth-moving equipment. Why such heavy machinery?

http://aqua.org/blog

Inspired by the water mills of Baltimore’s industrial past, the Water Wheel harnesses the power of the Jones Falls River to turn the wheel and lift trash and debris in to a dumpster barge.

aqua.org/blog/2015/april/floating-forests

Gardeners in Maryland know that most trees in our temperate climate don't like having wet feet. And water that's salty? Forget about it. Around here, having tree roots submerged in saltwater is guaranteed to kill off your landscaping.

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