Mary Rose Madden

Mary Rose Madden once woke to roosters in the rough and tumble neighborhood of Bushwick, Brooklyn.  Sheââââââââââââââââââ

Every Wednesday night for almost two and half years, Tawanda Jones and her family gather on the street with supporters trying to get justice for her brother, Tyrone West. They chant, "I can't stop.  I won’t stop. Until killer cops are behind cell blocks".

On the some of the hottest days of this summer, 14-year-old LaAsia Griffin and her big brother Jamal popped a white canopy tent and set up penny candy, chips, and crackers for sale on two long tables at a busy stop light in West Baltimore's Poppleton Neighborhood.

Three weeks before he was fired, Former Police Commissioner Anthony Batts held a meeting in a basketball court adjacent to a playground in West Baltimore. The community was invited to observe the meeting police were calling “community comstat”.

Programming Note: Today, we start a police reform series called, "On The Watch: Fixing The Fractured Relationship Between Baltimore's Police And Its Communities".  The series will run for the next twelve months.  Please email the reporter at with any comments or suggestions.

Crime in Baltimore is up, but police presence is down, residents say.  Arrests have plummeted, open air drug markets operate freely and since May 1, six homicide victims were under 18.

Baltimore’s police union announced Wednesday that it is launching a review of the police department’s actions in the days following Freddie Gray’s death from injuries sustained while in police custody.

Lt. Gene Ryan, president of the local Fraternal Order of Police, said more than 160 officers were injured during the riots after Gray’s funeral last month. He wants to clear up questions about what orders were given so that police officers will be safe should a similar situation arise in the future.  

Local foundations and the federal government have promised to funnel money into Baltimore for job training programs to respond to some of the communities’ needs articulated during the weeks or protests after the death of Freddie Gray. But what happens when the jobs don’t materialize?

For the first time since the city's unrest on April 27, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts talked openly yesterday about the situation his department faces as they try to re-build relationships with the community. He said it's a time of uncertainty for the city.

Baltimore police wrapped up yesterday their investigation into the death of Freddie Gray - the 25 year old African American man who died from injuries sustained while in police custody. But the findings weren't released to the public. That disappointed many who have been searching for answers. 

Protests continued in Baltimore as crowds gathered throughout the city calling for accountability in the death of Freddie Gray , a 25 year old African American man who died Sunday from spinal injuries obtained while in police custody.