Matt Purdy

Senior Producer, Maryland Morning

Matt Purdy is senior producer of Maryland Morning. He keeps an eye on city government, health policy, history, science, and music. Before coming to the show, he was a freelance reporter and producer in the WYPR newsroom. He reported on everything from crime in the city to legislation in the General Assembly. His short radio documentary about his bicycle trip across the United States won a 2010 ShortDoc Award from the Third Coast Audio Festival. You can follow him on Twitter.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Mon July 13, 2015

All-Star Games, Baseball In China and Women's Soccer With Mark Hyman

Nationals playing the Orioles on July 11, 2015.
Credit Keith Allison // Flickr Creative Commons

As the Orioles limp into the second part of the baseball season, Tom Hall talks sports with  journalist and George Washington University professor Mary Hyman.  Hyman also talks with us about a recent trip with students to China to examine the its efforts to export a top-notch professional baseball player.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri July 10, 2015

Pastor Heber Brown III On The Firing Of Police Commissioner Anthony Batts

Heber Brown III

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake fired Police Commissioner Anthony Batts on Wednesday. Commissioner Batts had been under-fire since the April riots and the surge in violent crime that followed. The Mayor named Deputy Commissioner Kevin Davis, a veteran of the Prince George's County police department, who most recently served briefly as Police Chief in Anne Arundel County. He joined the Baltimore Police Department in January as a Deputy Commissioner.

Rebuilding community relations will be one of Interim Commissioner Davis’s most important tasks. With Sheilah in the studio to talk about how that can be done is Pastor Heber Brown III of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church. He led protests of police actions in the death of Freddie Gray.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed July 8, 2015

What Coppin State University's New President Will Focus On

Credit coppin.edu

Coppin State University traces its roots back 115 years to a one-year teacher-training course preparing African-American elementary school teachers for the classroom. From there, Coppin grew in Baltimore. In 1938, it began granting Bachelors of Science degrees and was named the Coppin Teachers College. Nearly 30 years later, it gave out its first Bachelors of Arts degrees and was renamed Coppin State College. In 2004, it became Coppin State University.

In recent years, Coppin State has struggled with financial management, poor graduation rates, and low morale. In 2012, Coppin’s faculty voted “no confidence” in then-president Reginald Avery; he resigned. An interim president has led the school since 2013, but as of July 1, the historically black university has a new leader: Maria Thompson, formerly the provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at the State University of New York at Oneonta, is the first woman to head the school. She joins Sheilah in the studio to talk about her plans.

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed July 8, 2015

The Life Of Track Star Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Rudolph at the finish line during 50-yard dash at track meet in Madison Square Garden, 1961.
Credit New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection. - NYPL Digital

In the 1960s, African American track star Wilma Rudolph was known as the world’s fastest woman. She became the first American woman to win three gold medals in a single Olympics in 1960. Hers was an unlikely path to Olympic gold. She was born in rural Tennessee in 1940, an Olympic year, the 20th in a family of 22 children. At age 4, she contracted polio, which had no vaccine at the time. She was fitted with a brace, which she wore for several years. Actress Gwendolyn Briley-Strand will play the role of Wilma Rudolph in the Maryland Humanities Council’s 2015 Chautauqua Series. 

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Maryland Morning
8:50 am
Wed July 8, 2015

Historic Expedition By Edward Braddock Traced Through Western Maryland

Credit Dave // Flickr Creative Commons

Before Interstate 68 paved a path through the forests of Western Maryland, and even before Highway 40 snaked its way through Maryland’s wooded hills and into Pennsylvania, there was another path West, blazed by a British general, Edward Braddock. In the summer of 1755, General Braddock set out from Fort Cumberland, at what is today the city of Cumberland, on his way to Pittsburgh to do battle with the French over control of North America.

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