Matt Purdy

Senior Producer, Maryland Morning

Matt Purdy is senior producer of Maryland Morning. He keeps an eye on city government, health policy, history, science, and music. Before coming to the show, he was a freelance reporter and producer in the WYPR newsroom. He reported on everything from crime in the city to legislation in the General Assembly. His short radio documentary about his bicycle trip across the United States won a 2010 ShortDoc Award from the Third Coast Audio Festival. You can follow him on Twitter.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Mon March 23, 2015

New Government Dietary Guidelines OKs Eggs, Iffy on Red Meat

Credit UGA CAES / Creative Commons

About every five years, the government issues recommendations about what we should eat, based on the latest research. Last month, a group of 14 food, nutrition and medical experts on the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee sent a report to the Department of Health and Human Services and the Agriculture Department, with advice that may find its way into the final guidelines that the Government will issue later this year.

Whatever those guidelines end up being, it seems likely that a lot of us will pay them little heed. Almost half of Americans, about 117 million of us, have preventable chronic diseases . And even more of us, about 155 million American adults are overweight or obese. We talk about what the Advisory Committee found and some of the reactions to their report with our very own resident expert, the Nutrition Diva, Monica Reinagel. She’s a licensed nutritionist who blogs at Nutrition Over Easy, and whose weekly podcasts appear on Quickanddirtytips.com.

Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Fri March 20, 2015

Baltimore Blast Kicks Off Championship Finals Tonight

The Blast in 2013
Credit William Criss / Creative Commons

The Baltimore Blast, our Major Arena Soccer League team, has been around in one form or another since 1980, and it has often been one of the most dominant teams in the league. They’re 21-2 this year. They’ve won seven championships. And, this weekend, they play for number eight.

They’ll face the Monterrey Flash, a team from Mexico, in the championship series which begins tonight at Royal Farms Arena in Baltimore. With Tom Hall by phone is the captain of the Blast, Pat Healey.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed March 18, 2015

Reenvisioning Maryland's Criminal Justice System

Credit Kate Ter Haar / Flickr / Creative Commons

For evidence that Maryland’s criminal justice system needs reform, some point to its recidivism rate: the inefficiency shown in the fact that three years after inmates leave prison, four out of ten are back behind bars. There’s a bipartisan drive in the legislature to create a task force that would attach Maryland to a reform movement called the Justice Reinvestment Initiative, or JRI. It's a multi-state effort run by the U.S. Justice Department and the Pew Center on the States. We turned to Governor Hogan’s point man on the issue, Christopher Shank, who heads the Governor’s Office of Crime Control and Prevention.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed March 18, 2015

"Facing The Great War": Baltimore Students Explore Fort McHenry's World War I Legacy

Injured soldier, M. Giovanni. U.S. General Hospital No. 2, Fort McHenry, Baltimore. May 2, 1919. MdHS, PP32.932.

If you think Maryland’s spectacular celebration of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 told you all the interesting history of Fort McHenry, think again. A century ago, another armed conflict was starting in Europe, a combat that would grow into the first World War. A hospital at Fort McHenry would care for the American wounded of that war. We get a chance to learn more about the hospital, the fort, and the impact of the war through a collaboration among the Baltimore School for the Arts, the Maryland Historical Society and the National Park Service, which runs Fort McHenry. Stage production and acting students have been working with theater faculty, researching the period and the result is three short plays that will be performed at Fort McHenry this Saturday and next week.

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Maryland Morning
9:31 am
Mon March 16, 2015

"Frank: A Life In Politics From The Great Society To Same Sex Marriage"

Credit Farrar, Straus and Giroux Publishers

Former 

  Congressman Barney Frank represented the four congressional district in Massachusetts for 31 years until his retirement in 2012. He has just published a memoir titled Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same Sex Marriage profiling his life behind the work he has done around issues like Wall Street reform and "Don't Ask, Don't Tell". He joins host Tom Hall from Berkeley, California.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Mon March 16, 2015

Historian David McCullough On The Wonder Of The Wright Brothers

David McCullough delivering a speech in 2013
Credit Bob Muller / Creative Commons

Historian David McCullough has been awarded two Pulitzers, the National Book Award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and French Légion d’Honneur and none of his books have been out-of-print. If that's not enough, to add to his many accolades he has even narrated the movie Seabiscuit and numerous documentaries including Ken Burns' The Civil War. This Renaissance man is coming back to Baltimore to participate in the Baltimore Speakers Series on March 17th, presented by Stevenson University. David McCullough joins Sheilah Kast by  phone. 

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Maryland Morning
10:00 am
Fri March 13, 2015

Head Of Baltimore City Public Schools On The Budget Deficit

Credit "Let Ideas Compete" / Flickr / Creative Commons

  Baltimore City Public Schools are facing a serious deficit: more than $70 million – and, that doesn’t take into account a budget cut proposed by Gov. Hogan which would put the deficit at more than $100 million. Gregory Thornton, CEO of Baltimore City Public Schools has outlined how he plans to close that budget gap – by cutting surplus employees and trimming administrative staff. He joins Sheilah in the studio to talk about it.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Exploring New Ways To Fight HIV, Ebola

Credit NIAID / Creative Commons

We normally protect against viruses with a vaccine. You probably know how they work: a weakened or dead version of a harmful virus is injected into your body. Your body responds by producing antibodies to destroy the weakened virus. You’re then armed with the antibodies necessary to take on a healthier version of the virus. But, what about viruses like HIV? We don’t normally produce the right antibodies to fight it.

But scientists around the country are developing a new way of making sure the body produces the right antibodies. It could be used to treat HIV, Ebola, or malaria. Some of that work is being done here in Baltimore by Gary Ketner, professor and microbiologist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed March 11, 2015

"Beautiful Users: Designing For People"

The cover of Ellen Lupton's newest book, Beautiful Users
Credit Princeton Architectural Press

When Ellen Lupton became a gold medalist recipient from AIGA, the professional association for design, in 2007 they summarized her as someone who makes graphic design smarter, “If graphic design has a sense of its own history, an understanding of the theory that drives it and a voice for its continuing discourse, it's largely because Lupton wrote it, thought it or spoke it.” That remains true as she has just published her newest book, Beautiful Users: Designing for People. Locally, she works as the director of the Graphic Design Masers of Fine Arts degree program at MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art) and in New York works as senior curator of contemporary design at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum. This new book serves as the catalog for their latest show by the same name. Host Tom Hall sits down with Ellen to discuss what designing for people entails.

Maryland Morning
10:00 am
Mon March 9, 2015

Remembering Those Sent To Crownsville Hospital

The William L. Marbury Building at Crownsville Hospital Center
Credit Jack Says Relax / Flickr / Creative Commons

What became Crownsville Hospital Center started as farmland in Anne Arundel County and then, after the state bought the land in 1910, was known as the "Hospital for the Negro Insane of Maryland." Its patients or inmates included not only the mentally ill, but also blacks with mental disabilities, epilepsy or syphilis. Historians have chronicled grim conditions during Crownsville’s first five decades. Janice Hayes-Williams, a local historian who has looked carefully at death records from Crownsville, described the state hospital on WYPR’s The Signal in 2012: “This was the place you did not want to go, this was the place you were sent when no one else wanted you, this was the place you went when there was no other place to go.”

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