Matt Purdy

Senior Producer, Maryland Morning

Matt Purdy is senior producer of Maryland Morning. He keeps an eye on city government, health policy, history, science, and music. Before coming to the show, he was a freelance reporter and producer in the WYPR newsroom. He reported on everything from crime in the city to legislation in the General Assembly. His short radio documentary about his bicycle trip across the United States won a 2010 ShortDoc Award from the Third Coast Audio Festival. You can follow him on Twitter.

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Maryland Morning
8:52 am
Mon June 22, 2015

Doreen Bolger's 17 Years As Director Of The Baltimore Museum Of Art

Credit Chris Tengi // Flickr Creative Commons

Doreen Bolger has been the Director of the Baltimore Museum of Art for the past 17 years. She will retire from that position at the end of this month. Doreen’s impact on the cultural life of our community cannot be understated. She has been a forceful and effective advocate not only for the BMA, but for countless individual artists, and arts organizations large and small. Tomorrow night, folks are invited to gather at the museum to wish Doreen well as she ends her tenure at the BMA. This morning, she has been nice enough to invite Tom to her home in Charles Village, just a few blocks away from the museum.

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Maryland Morning
8:49 am
Mon June 22, 2015

The Colors We See May Not Be The Colors We Remember

Credit Capture Queen // Flickr Creative Commons

From fuchsia to salmon, azure to aquamarine, the human brain is capable of distinguishing millions of colors. Yet, when it comes to remembering exact hues, our brains fall short.

A Johns Hopkins-led team has published a new paper that says that when remembering a color, our brains drop the specifics. Instead, we retain the “best” version of a color. Nathan talks with Jonathan Flombaum, lead author of the paper. Flombaum is also a cognitive psychologist and assistant professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Johns Hopkins.

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Maryland Morning
8:57 am
Fri June 19, 2015

Nurturing Fatherhood And Families In Baltimore

Joseph T. Jones, Jr
Credit Center for Urban Families

The unrest in Baltimore in April brought intense focus on the racial and economic inequalities in certain sections of the city. And, also on the work local organizations are doing to help those communities overcome obstacles to jobs that pay a livable wage.

One of those organizations is the ‘Center For Urban Families,’ located near the epicenter of the unrest in Penn North. The non-profit runs programs geared toward everyone, but it focuses on fathers and their role in families. Joe Jones founded the “Center for Urban Families;” he’s President and CEO. Tom Hall spoke with him in 2013 for our series about inequality, “The Lines Between Us.” Today, just before Father’s Day, Sheilah checks back in with Joe Jones. 

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri June 19, 2015

How High Art Shaped The Early Days Of Television

Credit Maurice Berger

Maybe you were a "Mad Men" fan, or you were addicted to "Breaking Bad", or you’re losing sleep over the fate of Frank and Claire. If so, then maybe you think that we’re in a golden age of television. For years, TV was considered the lowest of low art. Back in 1961, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Newton Minow, described television as a “vast wasteland.” There’s plenty of trash on TV these days, but also, some of the world’s finest work in video and film. The connection between high art and the origins of TV is the subject of a new book that accompanies an exhibition that is currently at the Jewish Museum in New York.

Dr. Maurice Berger looks at the early years of American television from the 1940s through the 1970s, and the influence of the avant-garde and modernism on this medium that has come to dominate American culture. The book and the exhibition are called Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of American Television. Maurice Berger is Research Professor & Chief Curator at the University of Maryland Baltimore County’s Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture. He joins Tom on the line today from Argot Studios in New York.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Fri June 19, 2015

Larry Hogan Sr. On Bucking His Party, Inspiring His Son

Lawrence Hogan Sr. in 1973
Credit Congressional Pictorial Directory, 93rd

In July 1974 Maryland congressman Larry Hogan Sr., father of the current governor, was the first Republican on the House Judiciary Committee to vote for impeachment of President Richard Nixon.

Larry Hogan Sr. was a Republican, representing Southern Maryland in Congress, and his teen-aged son was aware during the Watergate investigation that the whole world was watching. At his inauguration last January, Hogan Jr. pointed to his father's decision to buck his party as a model for integrity.

Father’s Day seems like a good time to learn why the governor is so proud of his dad, so we joined Larry Hogan Sr. at his home in Frederick.

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