Matt Purdy

Senior Producer, Maryland Morning

Matt Purdy is senior producer of Maryland Morning. He keeps an eye on city government, health policy, history, science, and music. Before coming to the show, he was a freelance reporter and producer in the WYPR newsroom. He reported on everything from crime in the city to legislation in the General Assembly. His short radio documentary about his bicycle trip across the United States won a 2010 ShortDoc Award from the Third Coast Audio Festival. You can follow him on Twitter.

Pages

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon June 29, 2015

Growing Baltimore's High-Speed Internet Infrastructure

Credit Kainet

Baltimore has a lot of pressing infrastructure issues: leaky sewers, decaying bridges, lots of other transportation needs. And there’s another important item to add to the list: digital infrastructure, the cables and wires that connect city residents to the Internet. If you look at a map of super high-speed Internet availability in central Maryland, you’ll see Baltimore surrounded by opportunities to connect to the latest fiber-optics networks. But in the city, itself, it’s a different story – there is no residential fiber-optic service.

A new draft report from a task force on moving the city forward into a digital future calls for expanded broadband access throughout the city. I spoke about it with the co-chair of that task force, Deputy Mayor Colin Tarbert. With Baltimore still recovering from the unrest in April – I asked him how technological investment fits into the city’s long-term plan to reinvigorate itself. We also spoke with Andrew Coy, executive director of the Digital Harbor Foundation about how tech investment can transform our schools.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri June 26, 2015

Hogan Slams Brakes On The Red Line

Red Line projected economic development impact

    

What does Gov. Larry Hogan’s cancelation of the Red Line in Baltimore mean for public transportation in the city? We talk with urban design expert Klaus Philipsen, a consultant on the project.

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri June 26, 2015

Lea Gilmore, At The Intersection Of Music And Activism

Lea Gilmore will perform at Creative Alliance at The Patterson.
Credit Creative Alliance

  

Lea Gilmore is an internationally acclaimed blues, jazz and gospel singer who calls Baltimore home. However, a lot of her musical activity takes place in Europe and around the world. Tonight, you’ve got a chance to hear Lea in concert right here in Charm City. She’s presenting her Big Fat Blues Cabaret at the Creative Alliance at 8:00. Her latest CD is called Classically Blue: Lea Gilmore Live at the Eubie Blake Center, and she is continuing her long history of activism by organizing community sings around town, in response to the riots and the Baltimore uprising. She talks with Tom Hall.

Read more
Maryland Morning Podcast
1:53 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

Cancer In The Workplace; Photography During Unrest; Baltimore's Historical Legacy

Credit Steven Mileham/Creative Commons

Governor Larry Hogan announced on Monday that he has advanced, aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and is undergoing treatment. He also said he’ll remain on the job. We talk with a few cancer experts about managing cancer in the workplace.

Then – Two months ago, Devin Allen was an aspiring photographer in Baltimore. Then, a picture he made during the unrest landed on the cover of Time Magazine. We talk with him about a new exhibit of his work documenting the unrest coming to the Reginald F. Lewis Museum.

Plus: Burt Kummerow, head of the Maryland Historical Society, is stepping down from that role after five years. Tom Hall talks to him about efforts to make Maryland history come alive today.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed June 24, 2015

Managing Cancer In The Workplace

Credit Steven Mileham / Creative Commons

Gov. Hogan shared a lot at his press conference Monday. He went beyond announcing that doctors have diagnosed him with an advanced, aggressive form of cancer of the lymph nodes. He told us the cancer already has spread to dozens of spots in his body, that he’s doesn’t feel much pain but he doesn’t have much appetite, that the aggressive chemo his doctors plan will take a little over four months, and that the experts gave him good odds of surviving the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and clearing it from his body. Perhaps the message he underscored most often was that he intends to keep working while he’s undergoing treatment.

Since Gov. Hogan is the boss, he may have more say than many workers in how his cancer treatment plays out at the office. John Hopkins Medicine has recently launched a program called “Managing Cancer at Work” -- a wellness benefit employers can purchase to offer free to their workers. With us to talk about the issues cancer raises--for workers, caregivers and their managers-- is one of the cancer experts who designed the new program: Lillie Shockney, a registered nurse who is Administrative Director of the Johns Hopkins Breast Center and Director of Cancer Survivorship Programs. She has also survived two bouts with breast cancer. Also with us is Laurie Singer Sievers, a filmmaker and TV producer who serves on the advisory board of the John Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and produces their education and caregiver videos.

Read more

Pages