Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

Children in foster care may bounce around to different placements and different schools. But some of Maryland’s 4,700 foster children can count on a court-appointed volunteer to be a dependable presence in their lives. How does that work? We’ll hear from a volunteer, a mother whose son she worked with, and Ross DiEdoardo, executive director of the nonprofit CASA of Harford County.

The Baltimore Rock Opera Society’s new show is "Brides of Tortuga", a 17th-century feminist adventure on the high seas.

Courtesy of Stoop Storytelling Series

Time for the fourth installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series! Bridget Cavaiola shares a story about nuns, a dead bird, and the value of neighbors. Her story has been edited for brevity. The full version is available here

Johns Hopkins Medicine

If you think inflammation is generally a scratchy spot that’s not very significant, you should know researchers are working to understand the connection between inflammation and chronic diseases, including heart disease and cancer. We’ll learn about inflammation and how to reduce it. Our guest is Dr. Lisa Christopher-Stine, associate professor of medicine & neurology and director of the John Hopkins Myositis Center. She will be presenting at John Hopkins Medicine's annual Woman’s Journey seminar next week. 

Baltimore Speakers Series

Ehud Barak is one of those statesmen whose Wikipedia entry stretches for pages. He was Israel’s tenth Prime Minister, from 1999 to 2001. That was after he had been Foreign Minister, and before several years at Defense Minister. Ehud Barak is coming to Baltimore tomorrow for the Baltimore Speaker Series.

"The Perpetual Line-Up: Unregulated Police Face Recognition in America" / Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law

Half of American adults may not know it, but their photos are in face-recognition databases used law enforcement, according to an investigation by a think tank at Georgetown Law. Police can compare millions of mug shots, driver’s license, and ID photos against images of unknown suspects. This technology is less accurate in identifying African American, younger, and female faces. And because African-Americas are more likely to be arrested, they are overrepresented in the databases. We talk to David Gray, law professor at the University of Maryland, who says this face-recognition technology raises questions about our right to privacy.

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Artist Joyce Scott, of Baltimore’s Sandtown neighborhood, crafts jewelry and sculptures that explore issues like racism, sexism, and war. Last month she was awarded a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, also known as a genius grant. We hear her thoughts on politics as performance art and on what this award means to her. “The idea that I could be that girl from two blocks from where Freddie Gray started the end of his life, that I could receive and make art," she says, "That is a giant thing that I must be responsible for.” 

H&S Bakery

John Paterakis Sr., the Baltimore-born baker, businessman, developer, political donor and philanthropist, died on Sunday, aged 87. We reflect on John Paterakis’s impact on Baltimore with WYPR’s senior news analyst Fraser Smith, who profiled Paterakis for the Baltimore Sun, and M. Jay Brodie, who headed the Baltimore Development Corporation for many years.

Garry Knight / Flickr via Creative Commons

Can social media posts, even hashtags and emojis, be analyzed to prevent violent crime? The victims of gun violence are often young people, and young people are also loyal users of social media. Desmond Patton, an associate professor in the School of Social Work at Columbia University and an affiliate with the research group Data & Society, says social media provides a forum for teens to express pain and grief, but those conversations can escalate into real world violence. 

Maryland’s jails hold hundreds of people who judges say could be released on bail, but the defendants haven’t come up with the cash to pay the 10% bail fee. This month Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh issued an opinion that it’s probably unconstitutional to hold defendants in jail because they can’t afford to pay.  Frosh says the system upends the lives of many charged with minor crimes -- and doesn’t make Maryland’s citizens safer.

And we talk to a bail bondsman who agrees bail should be set so people can pay, but thinks most people awaiting trial in jail should be behind bars.

Read the opinion from Attorney General Brian Frosh.

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