Nathan Sterner | WYPR

Nathan Sterner

Local Host, Morning Edition

"If radio were a two-way visual medium," Nathan would see WYPR listeners every weekday between 5am and 3pm. Weekday mornings, Nathan serves up the latest Maryland news and weather (interspersed with the occasional snarky comment).  Nathan also does continuity breaks through the midday, edits Sheilah Kast's "On The Record," infrequently fills in for Tom Hall on "Midday," and does all sorts of fundraising stuff. When not at WYPR, Nathan teaches a class on audio documentary at Towson University, and spends spare time running around Baltimore's streets and hiking around Maryland's natural areas. Before coming to WYPR, Nathan spent 8 years at WAMU in Washington -- working every job from part-time receptionist to on-air host, gaining experience in promotions, fundraising, audience analysis, and program production. Nathan has also served as a fundraising consultant, and helped dozens of public radio stations nationwide with their on-air fundraisers. Originally from rural Pennsylvania, Nathan has called Charm City home since 2005.

Bitter cold in the forecast this morning... with lows in the single digits and high winds making it feel as cold as 11 below. A Wind Chill Advisory is in effect through 8am.

Many public schools in the WYPR listening area will open late.

There’s a 2-hour delay in effect for schools in: Baltimore City and Baltimore County.

Nathan Sterner / WYPR

Bitter cold and strong winds are following the Alberta Clipper system that dropped several inches of snow on Maryland yesterday. And the icy roads the storm left behind are prompting many schools to change their schedules.

On a 90 minute delay: schools in Kent CountyQueen Anne's County, and Talbot County.

National Weather Service / http://www.erh.noaa.gov/lwx/winterstorm/

Baltimore's first snowstorm of 2015 is upon us -- and prompting schedule changes at some of the region's schools.

Take A Trip To Pluto

Dec 5, 2014
NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/FLickr/Creative Commons

When NASA’s “New Horizons” spacecraft launched in January 2006, its mission was to explore the planet Pluto. But Pluto is more than 3 billion miles from Earth and while the spacecraft was making the trip, the International Astronomical Union stripped the celestial body of its status. So when “New Horizons” makes it there, it’ll actually be exploring the Dwarf Planet Pluto. The spacecraft has spent much of the journey in sleep mode and on Saturday, NASA is set to wake it up. Hal Weaver is a project scientist on the mission, which is run from The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel. He joins Nathan to talk about the mission.

More Than Trees

Nov 28, 2014
Sarabande Books website

Towson University Assistant Professor Angela Pelster's  collection of essays, “Limber”, is a book about trees; from “The Tree That Owned Itself” in Georgia, to “The Loneliest Tree on Earth” which once stood in the middle of the Sahara. But, the trees are often just a starting point for essays that delve into topics ranging from faith to love to language itself. Angela Pelster joined Nathan Sterner in the studio to talk about the book last July. 

National Weather Service / http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/lwx/winterstorm/

Winter Weather Advisories and Winter Storm Warnings are in effect for different parts of the listening area today. Baltimore City, Southern Baltimore County, and areas south are under Advisories, and expected to get an inch or so of snow (maybe a little more, maybe a little less). Northern Baltimore County and areas west are under Warnings, and could get up to 6 inches of snow.

  A final vote is expected to take place on whether Baltimore City Police officers will be required to wear body cameras at Monday’s city council meeting.  The bill, which is expected to pass, is also under a veto threat by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake who called the proposal rushed and not thought out. 

The mayor is also threatening to veto a bill that would ban plastic bags.  The bill originally proposed as a plastic bag fee in April was changed to a ban at last week’s council meeting.

Election Day

Nov 4, 2014

Today is election day. Maryland polling places are open from 7am through 8pm.

You can find your polling place here.

There are answers to frequently asked questions about voting here.

"The Baltimore Atrocities"

Oct 31, 2014

"The Baltimore Atrocities” is the title of the latest book by author John Dermot Woods. It’s a novel, but it’s not like any other novel you've ever read. It’s composed of a series of short tragic stories – the "atrocities" of the title – all of which are loosely connected to a larger narrative, involving missing children, and their siblings’ search for answers. That story, in itself, an atrocity. John Dermot Woods currently spends his days in Brooklyn, New York. But, the time spent here in Charm City appears to have affected him deeply. He joins Nathan Sterner to discuss the book.

Jack Lyons / Flickr / Creative Commons

Baltimore opened its waiting list for Section 8 housing vouchers for the first time in a decade last Wednesday. About 60,000 people, that’s roughly one in ten Baltimoreans, have signed up to take part in a lottery that would give them a shot at a Section 8 voucher. The Baltimore Sun’s Yvonne Wenger has been reporting on the story and joins Nathan Sterner by phone to talk about it.

Nurses are at the forefront of patient care, a fact that has never been more evident than with the ongoing Ebola crisis. The shortage of nurses -- and the demand for them as baby boomers age -- has been well-documented. Local authors and advocates Sandy and Harry Jacobs Summers claim that media stereotypes about nursing are part of the reason people are discouraged from joining the profession. Their book is, “Saving Lives: Why the Media's Portrayal of Nurses Puts Us All at Risk." Guest Host Nathan Sterner 

Maryland's early voting period runs from October 23 to October 30. Early voting centers are open from 10am to 8pm all eight days. The State Board of Elections has more information about early voting here. And you can find a printable list of all addresses for early voting locations here.

http://www.thebaltimoremarathon.com/

  The Baltimore Running Festival is underway! Expect traffic delays and street closures around Charm City today.

Information about street closures is here.

A map for for the Baltimore Marathon Route is here.

When it meets Monday, the Baltimore City Council is expected to confirm Eric Costello to fill the seat representing the 11th District -- which covers parts of south and west Baltimore, including downtown.

Costello would finish the term of Bill Cole, who left the Council earlier this year to head the Baltimore Development Corporation.

Midday Friday

Sep 12, 2014

The Maryland gubernatorial election isn’t until November, but outside groups are already ramping up negative campaigning. WYPR Reporter Karen Hosler joins us for a look at the campaign trail thus far. Also, with Maryland in the midst of marking the 200th anniversary of the writing of the National Anthem during the War of 1812, syndicated columnist Jamie Stiehm brings us the stories of two important women from the time: First Lady Dolly Madison and flagmaker Mary Pickersgille.

Christopher Connelly / WYPR

Nearly $25-million were spent on the governor’s race in the primary election season alone… that’s $2-million more than was spent on the governor’s race in 2010 in both the primary and general election seasons combined. A report from watchdog group “Elections Integrity Maryland” says more than 150 people double voted in the 2012 presidential election, casting ballots in MD and in Virginia. MD’s highest court says police can conduct DNA tests on sweat left behind by people who are not arrested. Plus: Baltimore’s new casino, Batts confirmed for 6 more years as Baltimore police commissioner, swimming restrictions at Ocean City, and more.

Andy Harris taken at CPAC 2013 by Gage Skidmore via flickr

1st District Congressman Andy Harris says the federal government has issued subpoenas as part of its investigation into Maryland's troubled health exchange. GOP gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan is leading Democratic nominee Anthony Brown in the money race – for now, at least. Baltimore’s casino opens. Financing plans for the Red Line more forward. Plus: medical marijuana regs, judicial appointments, scrutiny over a planned Somerset County wind farm, restrictions on smoking at Ocean City’s beaches. And much more.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

Maryland’s roads are expected to be crowded over the upcoming Labor Day weekend. A look at travel projections from AAA Mid-Atlantic and the Maryland Transportation Authority… plus the latest on the Chesapeake Bay’s expanding “dead zone,” prep for tonight’s grand opening of the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore, and a look at a report on last year’s Rosedale train derailment. Also: O’Malley’s PAC sends workers to Iowa and New Hampshire, Vice President Biden fundraises for Anthony Brown, rates are expected to rise at two Baltimore parking garages, and more.

Christopher Connelly / WYPR

Among the students attending class in Maryland this year will be thousands of the immigrant children from Central America who’ve crossed the US/Mexico border in recent months. The top gubernatorial candidates take their messages to the TV airwaves. Montgomery County’s police chief calls for cops to be outfitted with cameras. Plus: the politics of retirement, sewage spills, the National Park Service turns 98, and more.

Bank of America 32 W. Pennsylvania Avenue, Baltimore, MD taken by Elliot Plack via flickr

We examine the UMD report on hydraulic fracturing (aka “fracking”) and look at why it’s important for the governor’s race. We examine the preparation for the soon-to-open Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. Plus: MD’s share of the Bank of America settlement, Baltimore speed cameras, the Maryland State Fair opens, and more.

Algae Bloom in the Chesapeake Bay taken by painaporo via flickr

Baltimore is considering requiring cameras to be strapped to its police officers. The city has reached a settlement with the US Justice Department over its hiring practices. Last week’s rains are leading to major algae blooms in the Chesapeake Bay. A study shows that more drivers are failing to stop for school buses in Maryland. And more.

marfis75

 

You knew caffeine made you more alert. But now scientists are saying it may actually improve your memory. Neurobiologist Michael Yassa, while working as an assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences at Johns Hopkins, found that caffeine has a positive effect on long-term memory in humans.  Their research, published by the journal Nature Neuroscience, shows that caffeine enhances memories up to 24 hours after it is consumed.

Christopher Connelly / WYPR

While state officials say Maryland’s new health insurance exchange website will be ready to go by the next open enrollment period in November… they also say that the nearly 79-thousand Marylanders who bought private coverage through the old system will have to sign up for insurance again. Exelon files an application with Maryland’s Public Service Commission in its push to acquire more regional utilities, including Delmarva Power and Pepco. Another step was taken yesterday to bring an offshore wind industry to our state; the federal government awarded leases for 80-thousand acres of land off the coast of Ocean City to a subsidiary of an Italian renewable energy company. And more…

Taken in 2010 by Nuon via flickr

We report on the push to develop an offshore wind industry in Maryland. We examine a new study on the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing (aka “fracking”) in Western MD. Plus: a team from Aberdeen Proving Ground has completed the destruction of Syria’s most dangerous chemical weapons. MD’s unemployment rate rose to 6.1% in July. And more.

Solar Probe Plus: Here Comes The Sun

Aug 18, 2014
A rendering of Solar Probe Plus
NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Life on Earth depends on the Sun, that giant furnace nearly 93 million miles away that anchors our planet's orbit. Its light makes it possible for plants to grow, and for animals to eat them. But, for playing such an outsized role in our lives, there’re still quite a few things we don’t know about the sun.

Demonstrators took to the streets in Baltimore last night to protest the police shooting of an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri. State Comptroller Peter Franchot took his call for a later start to the school year to Ocean City yesterday. You’ve got two more days to get in on Maryland’s annual sales-tax-free shopping period. Today and tomorrow, you can buy many articles of clothing - including shoes - valued up to $100 without paying the state's six-percent sales tax. Plus: a new president for BCCC, why a fee-reduction bill drew Rawlings-Blake's first veto, spice-seller McCormick is recalling nearly 75-thousand bottles of ground oregano, and more.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WYPR

State employees will soon see changes in their health plans, including rewards for workers who take steps to stay healthy, and penalties for those who don’t follow medical advice. The Maryland State Fraternal Order of Police has endorsed Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown’s gubernatorial campaign. The latest on the implementation of the Common Core education standards. New vaccination requirements for MD students. A new commander for Baltimore’s homicide unit. And more.

Joel McCord / WYPR

6.3-inches of rain were recorded at BWI yesterday, the most rain ever recorded on an August 12th. A federal judge says the strict gun law that Maryland’s General Assembly passed last year is constitutional. A Circuit Court judge’s decision to strike down an ordinance exempting plans for a LNG export terminal at Cove Point from zoning regulations may or may not affect that project’s construction. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has issued her first veto. And more…

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

An agreement has been reached on how to pay to fix the retaining wall that collapsed along Baltimore’s East 26th Street amid heavy rains in April. The push for railroad improvements in Baltimore and the Northeast Corridor is continuing. The story of one of the thousands of unaccompanied minors who’ve come to the US from Central America. And more.

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