Nikki Gamer

Senior Producer, Midday

Nikki Gamer started off on the Midday staff as an intern and worked her way up to producer.  Before that, she was a newspaper reporter in New England, and also worked as a freelance writer for various news publications throughout Maryland.  She loves everything about working in public radio, especially because it brings together so many fascinating people.  Nikki Gamer is a graduate of Brown University and Northwestern University.  She loves her dog, and enjoys taking long hikes in the Maryland wilderness. 

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Midday with Dan Rodricks, Thur. April 3 1-2 p.m.
4:28 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Energy Bill Shock

Maryland's public service commission received numerous complaints about rate increases during the long winter.
Credit mit.edu

  The long, frigid winter resulted in unusually high utility bills for Marylanders. But for customers with variable-rate contracts, bills are especially steep, leaving some to wonder if the increases were from price gouging. 

Paula Carmody, head of the state's Office of People's Counsel and the citizens representative before the Maryland Public Service Commission, joins us to explain gas-and-electric bills and pricing and to answer listener questions and concerns.

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Midday with Dan Rodricks, Wed. April 2 12-1 p.m.
10:12 am
Wed April 2, 2014

The Clark Rockefeller Con

Walter Kirn's Blood WIll Out is an exploration of American class dynamics.
Credit ew.com

Writer Walter Kirn found himself part of a real-life plot twist when he realized that one of his longtime friends was playing him, and everyone else, as part of an elaborate con. In "Blood Will Out: The True Story of A Murder, A Mystery and A Masquerade," Kirn tells the chilling story of his friendship with Christian Gerhartsreiter, aka Clark Rockefeller, who duped Kirn for years by pretending to be part of the Rockefeller dynasty.

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Midday with Dan Rodricks: Tues. April 1, 1-2 p.m.
9:47 am
Tue April 1, 2014

De-Extinction Science: Coming To A Future Near You

Scientists are trying to bring back the passenger pigeon, which went extinct in the early part of the last century.

A growing number of scientists worldwide are working on projects to bring back to life animals like the wooly mammoth and the passenger pigeon.

But is the revival of extinct species a good thing for humanity? Or for the planet? We get into the science and the controversy of de-extinction with Nathaniel Rich, the writer behind The New York Times Magazine's cover story, The Mammoth Cometh. Original air date 03/13/14

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Midday with Dan Rodricks: Mon. March 31, 12-1 p.m.
1:50 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

The Future of Print Media

The Tribune Co., which owns The Baltimore Sun, announced at the end of last year that it would lay off 700 staffers, another sign of contraction of American print media.

News of bankruptcy last week for the parent company of The Daily Record, published in Baltimore for 125 years, came on the heels of the acquisition of the City Paper, the alternative weekly, by the Baltimore Sun Media Group.

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Midday with Dan Rodricks, Mon. March 24 1-2 p.m.
10:42 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Women and Online Harrassment

In many instances, anonymous online harassment goes unpunished.
Credit The Guardian

A few years ago, Slate staff writer Amanda Hess  was on vacation when a friend alerted her to a series of threatening Tweets about rape and murder directed at her from the Twitter account "headlessfemalepig."  Hess joins us to talk about her investigation into the matter, and to discuss gendered harassment in the Internet age.

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Midday with Dan Rodricks, Wed. March 19 12-1 p.m.
11:37 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Heroin Addiction in the Suburbs

Danny Torsch and his mother Toni Torsch the year of his death. Danny Torsch died at the age of 24 from a heroin overdose. His body was found by members of his family.
Courtesy of Toni Torsch

Heroin addiction has soared in the country's rural and suburban areas. In Maryland, the number of heroin-related deaths jumped more than 50 percent between 2011 and 2012, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 

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Midday with Dan Rodricks, Tue. March 18 12-1 p.m.
11:33 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Adults and Nature Deficit Disorder

Journalist Richard Louv warns of the danger of what he calls "nature deficit-disorder," or the distancing of humans from the environment.
Credit National Park Service

Bestselling author Richard Louv, founder of the Children & Nature Network,  spawned an international call-to-action with his writing on the importance of reconnecting kids to nature. 

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Midday with Dan Rodricks: Fri. March 14, 1-2 p.m.
11:26 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Midday Eats with Hong & Shields

Waterfront Kitchen's beet-cured salmon is great recipe for parties.
Credit Courtesy of Waterfront Kitchen

Our monthly foodie hour with Henry Hong of the Waterfront Kitchen and John Shields of Gertrude's. On this month’s edition: Do It Yourself Catering. If you’re a foodie -- someone who enjoys cooking, ever-eager to learn more about it -- you might at some point consider putting on a party for 30 or more people: Celebrating a milestone birthday, or a graduation. Or perhaps, as a wedding gift to friends, you volunteer to handle their reception.

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Midday with Dan Rodricks: Thurs. March 13, 1-2 pm
11:51 am
Thu March 13, 2014

De-Extinction Science: Coming To a Future Near You

The passenger pigeon, once the most common bird in North America, became extinct in 1914. But a group of scientists is working on bringing the bird back to life through the latest in genome technology.

A growing number of scientists worldwide are working on projects to bring back to life animals like the wooly mammoth and the passenger pigeon. But is the revival of extinct species a good thing for humanity? Or for the planet? We get into the science and the controversy of de-extinction with Nathaniel Rich, the writer behind The New York Times Magazine's cover story, The Mammoth Cometh.

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Midday with Dan Rodricks, Wed. March 12 1-2 p.m.
10:00 am
Wed March 12, 2014

One Hour/Three Stories

American Ballet Theatre soloist Misty Copeland.
Credit joelminden.com

We spend the hour with three female memoirists. Sue Meck lost her memory at the age of 22 following a traumatic brain injury; she's since spent her life trying to make sense of who she once was and who she became after the accident. Meck is the co-author of "I Forgot to Remember: A Memoir of Amnesia." 

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