P. Kenneth Burns | WYPR

P. Kenneth Burns

Reporter

Kenneth Burns is WYPR's Metro Reporter; covering issues that affect Baltimore City, Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties.

Prior to joining WYPR, Kenneth worked at WBAL Radio and WNAV in Annapolis.

The Prince George's County native has been a journalist since high school. He was a teen editor with Children's Express, later becoming news editor with Young D.C., a newspaper written by high school students. He started his professional career during his first year in college at WTOP in Washington, D.C. Other career stops includes the Radio America Network and Salem Communications as a producer. He also was a news contributor to WGMD in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware.

Kenneth, who lives in Baltimore, earned his associate's degree from Anne Arundel Community College and his bachelor's degree in political science from Towson University. He is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists and the Online News Association.

You can keep up with his "notebook" at kennethburns.tumblr.com and follow him on twitter @PKBNews.

P. Kenneth Burns

Baltimore 72nd City Council took office Thursday with more than half of its members newly elected. Council President Jack Young said that the members will focus on reducing crime, reducing the number of vacant properties and increase affordable housing. And, he said, he wants to partner with the private sector to accomplish those tasks.

John Lee

Catherine Elizabeth Pugh became the 50th mayor of Baltimore Tuesday before a standing room only crowd at the War Memorial Building. Her inauguration attracted not only a who’s who of Baltimore politicians and officials, but a who’s who of state leaders as well; Democrat and Republican. That included Republican Governor Larry Hogan who said he is optimistic about Mayor’s Pugh’s leadership. “I have no doubt that she will work tirelessly to address the problems facing Baltimore and to revitalize this great city,” he said.

P. Kenneth Burns

The Baltimore City Council is expected to approve a municipal ID program at its next meeting Monday. The cards are aimed at helping residents who may not have other forms of identification gain access to city buildings and city services. The idea is an outgrowth of one Councilman Brandon Scott had when he was on the staff for then-City Council President Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.

P. Kenneth Burns

In less than a month, the Baltimore City Council will undergo its biggest change since 2003 when it went from multi-member districts to single member districts.

P. Kenneth Burns

Catherine Pugh began outlining plans for her administration at a news conference Wednesday morning, her first as Baltimore’s mayor-elect. For starters, Police Commissioner Kevin Davis will stay, but longtime city Housing Commissioner Paul Graziano will be out. And she wants to end the city-state partnership that has run the schools since the late 90s.

P. Kenneth Burns

State Senator Catherine Pugh has staved off a late effort from former Mayor Sheila Dixon to become the mayor-elect of Baltimore City. Pugh also defeated Republican Alan Walden and the Green Party’s Joshua Harris in the process.

P. Kenneth Burns

What do most Baltimore City voters fear as they cast their ballots? That Donald Trump will be elected the next president of these United States of America…North America.

P. Kenneth Burns

A team of federal investigators joined Baltimore Police Tuesday in investigating a tragic bus crash in Southwest Baltimore where six died at the scene. Jennifer Morrison, an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, said they will be in Baltimore for the rest of the week investigating the crash “with the goal of ultimately determining the cause of the crash and issuing safety recommendations.”

P. Kenneth Burns

Six people were killed Tuesday morning and at least 10 injured when a school bus hit an MTA bus head-on during rush hour in Southwest Baltimore. City police spokesman T.J. Smith said the accident scene "literally looks like a bomb exploded in the bus," calling the damage "catastrophic."

P. Kenneth Burns

Republicans believe they can achieve something for the first time since the 1940s; elect a member of their party to the Baltimore City Council. It started when Republican Larry Hogan took the city’s first councilmanic district on the way to Government House (the governor’s residence) two years ago. The GOP began thinking they might be able to break the Democrats’ stranglehold on City Hall.

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