P. Kenneth Burns | WYPR

P. Kenneth Burns

Reporter

Kenneth Burns is WYPR's Metro Reporter; covering issues that affect Baltimore City, Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties.

Prior to joining WYPR, Kenneth worked at WBAL Radio and WNAV in Annapolis.

The Prince George's County native has been a journalist since high school. He was a teen editor with Children's Express, later becoming news editor with Young D.C., a newspaper written by high school students. He started his professional career during his first year in college at WTOP in Washington, D.C. Other career stops includes the Radio America Network and Salem Communications as a producer. He also was a news contributor to WGMD in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware.

Kenneth, who lives in Baltimore, earned his associate's degree from Anne Arundel Community College and his bachelor's degree in political science from Towson University. He is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists and the Online News Association.

You can keep up with his "notebook" at kennethburns.tumblr.com and follow him on twitter @PKBNews.

Pugh and Harris: P. Kenneth Burns/Walden: Walden For Mayor campaign

For the first time since 1999, the seat for Baltimore Mayor is open because Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake isn’t seeking a second elected term in office.

On November 8, city residents will have a choice between Democrat Catherine Pugh, Republican Alan Walden and the Green Party’s Joshua Harris.

For nearly half a century, the general election has been a mere formality for the Democratic candidate running to lead Charm City.  That was evident when Rawlings-Blake commented on the race in September.

P. Kenneth Burns

In case you missed it, the Baltimore City Police Department is a state agency.  It has been that way since the 19th century and it might affect the city’s negotiations with the Department of Justice for sweeping police reforms.

P. Kenneth Burns

Former Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon announced she will try to get her job back as a write in candidate for the general election.

Dixon filed the paperwork Tuesday before a news conference.  She acknowledged her newly revived campaign is going to be challenging.

“I know this is a uphill battle.  But I know that in the next four weeks, were gonna educate people in the ‘ABC’s’ of what it means to write-in a candidate,” she said.

She also added that her campaign is going to be “organic” and “grassroots.”

P. Kenneth Burns

Those who live in Baltimore’s suburbs have at least two options for cable television and high speed internet; Comcast and Verizon.  But for city residents, Comcast is the only game in town for cable television.  And they’re pretty much the only option for extremely fast internet as well.

Jason Hardebeck, Baltimore’s broadband coordinator, says it all “comes down to infrastructure.”

P. Kenneth Burns

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake charged Wednesday that State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby caved in to political pressure in the Freddie Gray case and failed to do a thorough investigation before charging six police officers.

“You can't bow to political pressure and charge when you're not ready,” the mayor said. “You got to stand up, be in the big role and say to the people if you need time to investigate."

P. Kenneth Burns

As expected, the Baltimore City Council passed Monday the largest tax financing package for a development in city history.

The 12-1-2 vote – for each bill - came after months of controversy over the size of the tax package and requirements for jobs, wages and housing.  The three-bill package creates the Port Covington development and taxing districts and authorizes $660 million in tax bonds to finance infrastructure work at the site.

The bonds would be repaid with property tax revenue generated by the profit.

Councilmen Bill Henry and Mary Pat Clarke abstained from voting on the package.  Councilman Warren Branch voted against the bills.

    

Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about how community benefit agreements greased the skids for the Port Covington TIF and the precedent that sets for future city development deals.

A Baltimore mayoral commission released Wednesday formalized recommendations to remove two city-owned Confederate monuments.

The commission studied four monuments in particular; the Lee Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell, the Roger B. Taney Monument at Mt. Vernon Place, the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Mt. Royal Avenue near Mosher Street and the Confederate Women’s of Maryland Monument at Bishop Square Park.

In January, it recommended removing the monuments to Taney, author of the Dred Scott decision, and Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson and keeping the other two.

The report also explained the history behind each monument.

P. Kenneth Burns

The Baltimore City Council gave preliminary approval Monday to a tax financing package for the proposed Port Covington development project.  The package is expected to pass a final vote at the council’s next meeting Sept. 19.

But Monday’s vote didn’t come before some members said they were concerned about how one of the bills – authorizing $660 million in tax bonds – was moved out of committee and to the full council.

P. Kenneth Burns

The Baltimore City Council will get a look Monday at all three bills that are part of the largest tax financing package for a development project in city history.  That’s because Councilman Eric Costello led efforts to wrest the bill authorizing bonds for the Port Covington project out of its committee.

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