P. Kenneth Burns

Reporter

Kenneth Burns is WYPR's Metro Reporter; covering issues that affect Baltimore City, Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties.

Prior to joining WYPR, Kenneth worked at WBAL Radio and WNAV in Annapolis.

The Prince George's County native has been a journalist since high school. He was a teen editor with Children's Express, later becoming news editor with Young D.C., a newspaper written by high school students. He started his professional career during his first year in college at WTOP in Washington, D.C. Other career stops includes the Radio America Network and Salem Communications as a producer. He also was a news contributor to WGMD in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware.

Kenneth, who lives in Baltimore, earned his associate's degree from Anne Arundel Community College and his bachelor's degree in political science from Towson University. He is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists and the Online News Association.

You can keep up with his "notebook" at kennethburns.tumblr.com and follow him on twitter @PKBNews.

Voters Organized for the Integrity of City Elections, VOICE, filed a complaint in U.S. District Court Thursday challenging the certification of Baltimore’s primary election results.

The citizens group is seeking a new primary election because of alleged irregularities that occurred primary day in April. Among other things, the group charges that election judges were hired without being trained.

Nero Not Guilty

May 24, 2016

Baltimore Police Officer Edward Nero was acquitted Monday by Circuit Judge Barry Williams of all charges against him in the Freddie Gray case. 

Nero was indicted on second degree assault, reckless endangerment and two counts of misconduct relating to last year’s death of Freddie Gray from a broken neck suffered while in police custody.

Williams took about twenty minutes to explain his reasoning.

Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams is to issue Monday his verdict in the trial of police Officer Edward Nero.

Nero has been charged with second degree assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office in last year’s death of Freddie Gray.

Court is to begin at 10:30 a.m.

The Maryland Court of Appeals – the state’s highest court – released Friday its written opinion explaining why it ordered one police officer accused in last year’s death of Freddie Gray to testify against his five co-defendants.

Prosecutors and defense attorneys presented their closing arguments Thursday before Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams.  And now Williams is examining the evidence and testimony presented at the trial of police Officer Edward Nero.

    

Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams will hear closing arguments Thursday in the trial of police Officer Edward Nero who is facing second degree assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment for his alleged role in the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Nero defense rests

May 19, 2016

  A former training director for the Baltimore Police Department testified Wednesday there was “no possible way” an officer could safely buckle a suspect in the back of a police van.

Capt. Justin Reynolds, one of the last two defense witnesses in the trial of Officer Edward Nero, said an officer risked being assaulted if he tried.

Nero is one of six officers charged in the case of Freddie Gray, who died a week after his arrest in April 2015 from injuries suffered in the back of a police van.

The police sergeant who trained Officer Edward Nero in the field praised him Tuesday as the defense continued its case in Nero’s trial on charges stemming from the death last year of Freddie Gray in police custody.

  Officer Garret Miller testified yesterday that it was he who handcuffed Freddie Gray at the time of his arrest in April 2015, not Officer Edward Nero, and that he later placed leg restraints on Gray at the second stop of the police van taking Gray to the Western District station.

He also said he made the call for the wagon to meet them at the edge of Gilmore Homes to pick up Gray.

Prosecutors could call one, or even two, of police Officer Edward Nero’s colleagues to testify against him today as his trial on charges in the Freddie Gray case goes into a third day.

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