Ric Cottom

Host, Your Maryland

Ric Cottom, host of "Your Maryland," came to Baltimore more than four decades ago and never left. Formerly the editor and publisher at the Maryland Historical Society, he now runs the Chesapeake Book Company, publishing Chesapeake regional history, biography, and environmental studies.

Ric lives in historic Roland Park with his lovely wife Barbara. He loves Maryland seafood, Hopkins lacrosse, Ravens football, good books, tropical islands, and a dry martini, in no particular order.

From the shores of the Chesapeake to the Allegheny Mountains, "Your Maryland" brings you four centuries of colorful men and women who have called this state home. Join us on Thursdays at 5:30 during All Things Considered and discover—"Your Maryland."

"Lanier's Flute"

Feb 11, 2016

Whilst imprisoned at Point Lookout during the Civil War, Sidney Lanier played his flute and  provided a bit of comfort amidst the harsh conditions of the camp. 

"Goliath"

Feb 2, 2016

The story of one of the lesser known heroes of the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904. 

"Diamond" Jim Brady

Feb 2, 2016

The story of "Diamond" Jim Brady, a man with an enormous appetite, a love of diamonds, and a very generous spirit.   

"Ingle's Rebellion"

Jan 21, 2016

The English Civil War influences events in Maryland in the 17th century.   

Edgar Allan Poe finds inspiration for some of his best-loved short stories whilst living in Baltimore in the early 1830s.   

In January,  1912, a little black cat, a firehouse mascot, tagged along on a fire call, frightening the superstitious firemen. 

Mrs. Smith's Ball

Dec 29, 2015

In 1803, Betsy Bonaparte, an early American fashionista,  causes a stir at a Christmas Eve ball with her stylish and revealing European attire. 

"Mary Garrett"

Dec 17, 2015

In 1893, Mary Garrett,  daughter of B&O Railroad magnate  John Work Garrett,  uses her fortune to fund the nation's first co-educational medical school at Johns Hopkins. 

"The Gold Hoard"

Dec 10, 2015

In 1934, two teenage boys find a secret stash of gold coins in the basement of an empty house on Eden Street in Baltimore. 

Pages