Ric Cottom | WYPR

Ric Cottom

Host, Your Maryland

Ric Cottom, host of "Your Maryland," came to Baltimore more than four decades ago and never left. Formerly the editor and publisher at the Maryland Historical Society, he now runs the Chesapeake Book Company, publishing Chesapeake regional history, biography, and environmental studies.

Ric lives in historic Roland Park with his lovely wife Barbara. He loves Maryland seafood, Hopkins lacrosse, Ravens football, good books, tropical islands, and a dry martini, in no particular order.

From the shores of the Chesapeake to the Allegheny Mountains, "Your Maryland" brings you four centuries of colorful men and women who have called this state home. Join us on Thursdays at 5:30 during All Things Considered and discover—"Your Maryland."

Politics and newspaper publishing prove a potent mix in the early 19th century in Baltimore. 

Captain John Smith's  exploration and exploits in the Chesapeake region. 

"Color Guard"

May 24, 2017

In 1864, black men from Baltimore and surrounding areas, both free and enslaved, volunteered to fight for the Union Army as soldiers of the 4th U.S. Colored Infantry. 

In the late 19th century, horse racing enthusiasts worked to bring world class horses and high stakes races to Baltimore. 

In 1816, a series of volcanic eruptions resulted in bizarre weather all over the world, with freezing temperatures, snow, and sleet, and catastrophic consequences. 

In May, 1861, in the wake of the Pratt Street Riots, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney issued a writ of habeas corpus for John Merryman, who had been imprisoned at Fort McHenry for his actions preventing the movement of Federal troops into Maryland. The decision became known as "Ex Parte Merryman," and was upheld by the Supreme Court in 1866. 

"Clara's Boys"

Apr 26, 2017

After the Pratt Street Riot in Baltimore, Clara Barton attended to the Massachusetts volunteers after their train arrived in Washington, DC, and went on to found the American Red Cross. 

"Monty R"

Apr 19, 2017

On April 13, 1940, Monty R, a "family pet" born and raised in Maryland horse country, defeated the favored thoroughbred Blockade at My Lady's Manor in a shocking upset. 

During the War of 1812, American sailors and soldiers were held in England's Dartmoor Prison, where they endured harsh conditions, meager rations, and cruel treatment. 

On February 19, 1951, Joseph "Tunnel Joe" Holmes escaped from the Maryland State Penitentiary via a 70 foot long tunnel under the jail. 

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