Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Baltimore’s tangled history, firmly in the shadow of Annapolis, has given it an inferiority complex. So says Johns Hopkins professor emeritus of political science Matthew Crenson, whose new book is: Baltimore: A Political History. We ask him why early town fathers didn’t have the power to keep pigs from wandering the streets, how investing in the first interstate railroad left the city too debt-burdened to pay for police and schools, and why he thinks Baltimore has tried to deal with race issues by not talking about them.

A book launch will be held tonight, August 8th, at 4 pm, at the Baltimore City Archives, 2615 Matthews St. 

We talk with award-winning journalist Mary Otto about her new book “Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality, and the Struggle for Oral Health in America.” It chronicles the rise of cosmetic dentistry and the marketing of the coveted ‘Hollywood Smile,’ contrasted with decades of deficient access to oral healthcare for many Americans--a gap that still pervades and challenges the system. Otto’s book was spurred by the tragedy of Deamonte Driver in Prince George’s County, who died at age 12 from infection from an abscessed tooth. Otto will be speaking about her book and signing copies for sale at the Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry, an event co-sponsored with the Public Justice Center and Health Care for the Homeless. You can find out more about the event here, and you can purchase the book here. This is a rebroadcast of the original program from May 22, 2017.

Just Married!

Aug 7, 2017
Courtesy Jewish Museum of Maryland

A wedding ceremony may be the union of two souls, but the day represents so much more--encompassing families, cultures and communities. Tracie Guy-Decker, Jewish Museum of Maryland associate director talks about what we can read into dresses, documents, chuppas and cake-toppers -- some of what's featured in the new JMM exhibit, "Just Married! Wedding Stories from Jewish Maryland." This is a rebroadcast of the original program, which aired on June 22, 2017.

Courtesy NY Public Library collection

During decades of Jim Crow, African-American travelers couldn’t be sure what they’d face at a strange restaurant, a hotel, even a gas station. Would the door be slammed in their face, or worse? The Green Book, an annual listing of establishments welcoming black customers, started in the late ‘30s. We speak with Anne Bruder, a State Highway Administration historian who is researching Green Book businesses in Maryland. We also talk with Traci Wright of the Park School, who discusses the Green Book with students from several high schools on an annual Civil Rights trip and also with civil-rights icon Dr. Helena Hicks, who recalls using the guide when she traveled for her work. 

Anne Bruder will speak about her research Aug. 5 at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum. You can find more information on her talk here.

David Cook / Flickr via Creative Commons

From the shape of the nests birds build to the color of their feathers, technology is turning theories dating back to Darwin on their head. Biologist Jordan Price, of St Mary’s College of Maryland, has mapped the genes of both ancient and more recently derived bird species. He tells us why domed bird nests evolved into the widespread bowl shape, why the color of feathers might be more about camouflage than attraction, and what scientists got wrong when studying the differences between female and male birds. Original air date: May 17, 2017.

Living Design Lab

Here’s an unusual idea: using tiny houses to address the affordable housing crisis. Many of these homes are 200 square feet or less. Could they help house low-wage earners in Baltimore? Greg Cantori, CEO of Maryland Nonprofits, and Davin Hong, principle architect at the Living Design Lab, describe their vision. And Klaus Philipsen, urban planner and president of Archplan, Inc., shares his thoughts on the feasibility of this approach.

Drop the Gun

Jul 31, 2017

Just over halfway through this year, Baltimore has crossed a frightening threshold: more than 200 city residents have been murdered. What can be done to stop the violence? Daniel Webster, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, discusses the obstacles posed by stolen guns and repeat offenders. And Erickka Bridgeford, one of the organizers of a 72-hour ceasefire this coming weekend, explains how she is making a pitch for peace.

Morgan Smith, sharing how the French New Wave film, Band of Outsiders, changed his course in life. You can find more stories like this, as well as information about live Stoop events, here.

From playing basketball in South Baltimore to churning out pints of cool mint chocolate chip and sweet honey graham. We speak with two of the founders of Taharka Brothers Ice Cream, Sean Smeeton and Carroll Skipwith, about the company’s start, its roots in the community, and the universal appeal of ice cream. 

Andrew O'Brien / Flickr via Creative Commons

Sunscreen, bug spray, shampoo, deodorant. When we wash personal care products like these off of our bodies, they go down the drain, pass through wastewater treatment plants, and end up in our rivers and oceans. Scientists have found numerous ill effects from these chemicals, including the feminization of fish. Environmental engineer Lee Blaney, associate professor at UMBC, joins us to talk about his research in local waterways.

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