Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Thousands of Baltimore City residents have outstanding warrants for failing to appear for court dates on misdemeanor charges. A partnership between Baltimore City and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law is offering people a second chance to appear in court. We speak to Doug Colbert, professor of Law at the University of Maryland and director of the law school’s Access to Justice clinic, about who is eligible for a second chance, and how to proceed.

Chesapeake Bay Program / Flickr via Creative Commons

The 2017 General Assembly convenes on this day, facing many environmental issues -- from fracking to pollution trading, tax credits for electric cars to cleaning up the Bay. Tim Wheeler, managing editor and project writer for the Bay Journal, joins us with a preview of the session’s anticipated environmental agenda.

Steven Depolo/Flickr via Creative Commons

Today we’re talking about cancer, and a surprising rise in oral cancer. A recent analysis found that insurance claims for oral cancer have skyrocketed over the last five years, particularly among men. What explains this rise, why do men appear to be more vulnerable than women, and what can be done to prevent cancer of the mouth, tongue, tonsils, and throat? Dr. Gypsyamber D'Souza, an associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, joins us in studio.

The​ decade-long ​legal​ ​struggle​ ​between​ ​Maryland​ ​and​ advocates for ​its historically​ black​ ​​universities​ ​and​ ​​colleges​ ​is​ ​back​ ​in​ ​federal​ ​court. The​ ​HBCU coalition alleges​ ​Maryland​ ​has​ ​underfunded​ ​its​ ​historically​ ​black​ ​institutions and​ ​allowed​ ​other​ ​state​ ​schools​ ​to​ ​duplicate​ ​their​ ​programs, draining​ ​students​ ​away​ ​and keeping HBCUs from achieving racial diversity. “Frankly what happens is that white students will not go to the HBCU. They’ll go to the traditionally white institution if both schools offer the same programs," says our guest, Jon Greenbaum of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. He is one of the lawyers representing the coalition. We hear a different view from commentator Laslo Boyd, former acting state secretary of higher education.

Time for the next installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. Mario Rolando Diaz recounts his escape from El Salvador during the country’s Civil War. His story has been edited for brevity. The full version is available here.

You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Instagram: @ShareaBabyMD / ShareBaby Baby Pantry

Babies go through dozens of diapers each week - an expensive but necessary purchase to keep infants healthy. But when families can’t make ends meet, they may resort to stretching out their supply. Social worker Eliseba Osore saw first hand the need for free diapers. Osore tells us how, as an Open Society Institute Community Fellow, she plans to expand her diaper bank into a free baby pantry - with clothing, furniture, and other supplies.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr via Creative Commons

In a little over two weeks, President-elect Donald Trump will become President Trump. As he ascends to the nation’s highest office, the media is doing a lot of navel gazing. Why did the press fail to predict his win? Is the media elitist, as many Trump supporters contend? And how should journalists deal with the rise of fake news? With us to discuss such questions is writer and cultural critic Lee Siegel. He is the winner of a National Magazine Award for Reviews and Criticism, and a regular contributor to the Columbia Journalism Review, where he’s written numerous articles about media in the age of Trump. He joins us from a studio at Montclair State University in New Jersey. 

Rachel Baye / WYPR

Even before the Maryland General Assembly convenes a week from today, some lines of conflict are clear: will Democrats override Republican Governor Hogan’s veto of legislation requiring more electricity to be generated by renewables, with a surcharge on customers’ bills? What spending cuts will Hogan propose to close the $400 million-dollar budget shortfall? Who will win the face off over how to choose which transportation projects get funded?

WYPR’s statehouse reporter, Rachel Baye, and The Daily Record’s government reporter, Bryan Sears, tell us how they think the session will shape up, and what may come of it.

A study by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds depression growing among adolescents in the United States, particularly girls. From 2004 to 2014, the number of young people who experienced an episode of depression grew by 30 percent, with 1 in 6 girls reporting a bout of depression in the past year. Study leader and professor of mental health, Dr. Ramin Mojtabai says more research is needed. Then, preventing and spotting depression in teens. Hopkins psychologist Tamar Mendelson tells us what behavioral changes parents and teachers should look for.

Start with racism and sexism. Mix in religion, politics, and money. Then add a room full of strangers. That may sound like a dicey recipe for open and honest conversation, but JC Faulk has crafted a thoughtful way to approach these hard subjects. It’s called Circle of Voices. Since January, about 2,000 people from across Baltimore have participated in conversations facilitated by Circles of Voices. Now, JC Faulk has been named one of this year’s Open Society Institute Baltimore’fellows. Like the nine other fellows, he’ll will receive $60,000 over the next 18 months to fund a local project. The nonprofit Open Society Institute focuses on addressing the needs of Baltimore’s underserved communities and supporting innovative solutions to longstanding problems. 

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