Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Will The Cost of Sending Money Abroad Go Up?

100 peso bill.
Credit rageforst æsthir / Flickr / Creative Commons

Sheilah talks with Paul Dwyer, co-founder and CEO of Viamericas, a national money transfer company based in Bethesda.
More than $50 billion were sent from the United States to people in other countries in 2012, according to the World Bank. In Maryland, there are dozens of money transfer companies operating, with thousands of different places you can transfer money abroad. But, the cost of doing so, which has been falling in recent years, might reverse course soon and start going up. With Sheilah Kast to talk about it is Paul Dwyer, co-founder and CEO of Viamericas, a national money transfer company headquartered in Bethesda.

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed July 9, 2014

What Sri Lanka Can Teach You About Parenthood

Credit Rutgers University Press

Professor Chapin joins Sheilah in the studio to share her experiences.

If you give a toddler everything she wants, she’ll develop a bad case of the Terrible Two’s, into the Terrible Three’s and Four’s.   She’ll become a spoiled brat, and she’ll probably spend her whole life demanding her own way.  Everybody knows that, right? University of Maryland, Baltimore County associate professor Bambi Chapin’s anthropological research in Southeast Asia shows it isn't necessarily true.

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Maryland Morning
9:03 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Should Poor Marylanders Have Free Access To A Lawyer In Certain Civil Cases?

Credit Scott / Flickr / Creative Commons

Sheilah talks with Pamela Ortiz, Executive Director of the Maryland Access to Justice Commission.

Fifty years ago the U.S. Supreme Court established a right to a lawyer in criminal cases if the defendant can’t afford one. That was the decision Gideon v. Wainwright. But, should the state provide a lawyer in certain civil cases? How would such a system work? And, who would pay for it? Those are questions that a task force in Maryland has been grappling with since last fall. It comprises judges, legislators, and lawyers and is staffed by Pamela Ortiz, Executive Director of the Maryland Access to Justice Commission. She joins Sheilah Kast to talk about it.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Maryland's Not-So-Prominent Role in Writing the U.S. Constitution

Samuel Chase, referred to sometimes as "Old Bacon Face", was one of Maryland's delegates to the constitutional convention. Painted by John Beale Bordley.
Credit Public Domain

Sheilah talks with David O. Stewart about Maryland's contribution to the writing of the Constitution in 1787.
On July 4th, we mark our country’s declaration of independence from Britain in 1776. It was another 11 years before we’d draft the framework of laws that guide our country today: During a humid summer in Philadelphia 1787, 55 delegates from a dozen states gathered to write our constitution. Some of those men tower in our memories to this day. Virginia’s delegation, for example, included James Madison, George Mason, and George Washington. And, Maryland? Historian David O. Stewart writes in his book “The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution”, that Maryland did not send her most distinguished citizens to the convention. Sheilah Kast spoke with him about it in August 2007.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed July 2, 2014

More Than Bullets

Credit Lokesh_Dhakar / Flickr / Creative Commons

To discuss urban violence and youth PTSD, Sheilah Kast speaks with licensed social worker Pamela Willis and Stanford University professor Victor Carrion.

Some research says that the rate of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder among children in violent neighborhoods is twice that of returning Iraq veterans. 

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon June 30, 2014

District Court of Maryland Is Looking for Lawyers

Credit Scott / Flickr / Creative Commons

Sheilah talks with the District Court of Maryland's Chief Judge John Morrissey.
Last September, Maryland’s highest court, the Court of Appeals, ruled that if you’re arrested, you have a right to an attorney at an initial bail hearing and if you can’t afford one, the state must provide one. The District Court of Maryland is trying to lure lawyers across the state to meet the new need with their “Appointed Attorneys Program”. Joining Sheilah to talk about it is Chief Judge John Morrissey of the District Court of Maryland. 
Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Monocacy: The Battle That Saved Washington

Monocacy National Battlefield Park.
Credit Mr.TindDC / Flickr / Creative Commons

Sheilah talks with Monocacy National Battlefield Park Ranger Brett Spaulding about the Civil War's "Battle of Monocacy."

One-hundred and fifty years ago this week, Confederate General Robert E. Lee was hatching a plan he hoped would gain him the enemy’s capital, Washington, D.C.  Lee had dispatched Lt. Gen. Jubal Early and 15,000 rebel soldiers up through Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley to cross the Potomac into Maryland on the Fourth of July. Five days later, July 9, 1864, at Monocacy Junction, a few miles southeast of Frederick, Confederate and Union forces clashed in perhaps the least known important confrontation of the Civil War.  It’s sometimes called “The Battle that Saved Washington.”

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Mon June 30, 2014

How One Man's Story Reflects The Story of India in the 20th Century

Sheilah talks with Johns Hopkins anthropologist Anand Pandian about his new book about his grandfather's life in India.

Johns Hopkins anthropologist Anand Pandian has written a dual memoir with his 95-year-old grandfather, describing a life shaped by the great wars and movements of the 20th century in South Asia and across the globe. It's called "Ayya’s Accounts: A Ledger of Hope in Modern India." Anand Pandian joins Sheilah in the studio to tell us about it.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Testing and Treating HIV in Baltimore

Credit Jamyla Kay

Sheilah talks with Dr. Robert Redfield, associate director of the Institute for Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Derek Spencer, Executive Director of the Joint AIDS Community Quest for Unique and Effective Treatment Strategies.

It’s an alarming statistic: 1 in 43 people in Baltimore is living with HIV. For the size of its population, Maryland has more people living with HIV than any other state.  

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri June 27, 2014

How German Culture in Baltimore Changed After World War I

Der Deutsche Correspondent, a German-language newspaper published in Baltimore. The headline reads: "New Tragedy in House Hapsburg, Austria's Heir to the Throne and Wife Murdered".
Credit Courtesy of the Maryland Historical Society's Hilgenberg Archive Project.

Sheilah talks with amateur Historian John Foertschbeck.

Rarely has a bullet caused the death of so many. One-hundred years ago tomorrow, a Serbian nationalist fired a bullet that struck and killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. The assassination sparked World War I, which ultimately involved 100 countries and cost the lives of millions of people worldwide.

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