Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

A month into office, President Trump declared the press to be the enemy of the American people. By several measures, hostility against journalists is ratcheting up. Beth Am Synagogue has asked four journalists to analyze “press freedoms under siege.”

We’ll hear from Ben Jacobs, a reporter who was bodyslammed by a Republican congressional candidate last spring, And TV producer David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, who will kick off the series this weekend.

Scout out talented students at HBCUs, prepare them for the rigors of law school, mentor them throughout their careers. The Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence aims to boost diversity in the legal profession.

We hear from the co-founders, University of Baltimore law professors Michael Higginbotham and Michael Meyerson, and we meet two graduates at the start of their law careers, Annice Brown and Keon Eubanks.

Johns Hopkins Center for Diagnostic Excellence

Each year an estimated 12 million Americans get the wrong diagnosis from their doctor--a medical problem is seen as something else, missed entirely or identified late. Most of the diagnostic errors are not about rare diseases, and in about one third of these cases the results of the error are serious, even fatal. Neurologist Dr. David Newman-Toker joins us to talk about the new Johns Hopkins Center for Diagnostic Excellence at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. They aim to improve how diagnoses are made. Dr. Newman-Toker, who heads the center, also shares actions a patient can take to improve their odds.

As suicide rates approach a 30-year high, researchers are working to pinpoint the causes of suicide attempts and, determine how to keep people who are vulnerable to suicide... from access to the most lethal means of completing that act-- firearms. We hear from Dr. Paul Nestadt, psychiatrist and post-doctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research compares urban and rural suicide rates in Maryland.

Walters Art Museum

Though the name sounds foreboding, the Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is in fact a celebration of life. The Walters Art Museum has built a traditional altar, or ofrenda … and has planned several events to bring the holiday to life in Baltimore. We talk with Amanda Kodek, Director of Education, and Alexander Jarman, Manager of Adult and Community Programs, to learn about the activities, and the holiday itself. Creative Alliance also has many Dia de los Muertos activities planned, and you can learn more about them here.

PBS Against All Odds

When it comes to daily headlines, the black middle class is nearly invisible. The news tends to focus on dysfunction in poor black neighborhoods, confrontations with police, disappointing achievements in urban schools. There's a lot missing from that narrative. To find out more, we talk with journalist Bob Herbert, who wrote and produced the documentary “Against All Odds: The Fight for a Black Middle Class.” He brings decades of reporting and analysis together to explain what African-American families have confronted in pursuing the American Dream. Please note, the local screening and panel discussion of this event at the Parkway Theater is SOLD OUT.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

In 1932 the U.S. Public Health Service enlisted African-American men in Macon County, Alabama in a syphilis study. The men weren’t asked for informed consent -- and were told they would get treatment. They didn’t, even after penicillin was shown to cure syphilis.

We meet Peter Buxtun, a public health employee who discovered in the 1960s what was happening and bioethicist Nancy Kass, from Johns Hopkins’ Berman Institute, explains how Buxtun’s whistleblower helped shape the rules and regulations surrounding research today.

Peter Buxtun will be speaking at UMBC tomorrow at 4 pm in Lecture Hall 1 in the Biological Sciences Building.

The Samaritan Women's Facebook Page

For the past decade, survivors of domestic sex trafficking have found refuge at The Samaritan Women, a program in Baltimore that offers long-term housing and therapy.

Founder Jeanne Allert tells us why she was drawn to serve women who’ve experienced such exploitation and about The Samaritan Women’s spiritual focus. And we hear from two survivors - Cici and Alex - who are rebuilding their lives and planning for the future with the help of The Samaritan Women.

If the Trump presidency seems to be unfolding like a firehose of tweets and hysterical headlines, stay tuned for two experts who are looking to put it in context. Pulitzer-Prize-winning presidential historian Jon Meacham finds fundamental contrasts between the 45th chief executive and the 41st, the first President Bush.

And political scientist Todd Eberly of St. Mary’s College of Maryland has just co-authored a book titled "The Trump Presidency: Outsider in the Oval Office". Eberly will be speaking at 7:30 pm on November 7 on campus in the Daugherty-Palmer Commons building. 

Iraqi Jewish Archives

During a search for weapons of mass destruction in 2003, it was discovered that Saddam Hussein’s intelligence headquarters held priceless artifacts ... then the building was bombed and burst water pipes and flooded the basement nearly destroying the contents. Marvin Pinkert, the director The Jewish Museum of Maryland, tells the story behind the dramatic rescue of these artifacts, several of which are featured in the museum's latest exhibit, “Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.” The centuries-old records detail communal life, religious practices and eventual persecution of Jews in Iraq.

The Sixth Branch

Few neighborhood rebuilding groups can claim they’re driven by a military sense of purpose. Today we hear from Rich Moore, founder of The Sixth Branch in Baltimore. He and Scott Goldman, the nonprofit's executive director talk about how the group channels the leadership skills and commitment of military veterans to serve local communities through organizing, building and maintaining projects. Regina Hammond, joins us too, to talk about the lasting impact The Sixth Branch has had on the Johnson Square neighborhood. Find out how you can get involved here.

Dean Shareski / Flickr via Creative Commons

One of the most common learning disabilities - dyslexia - complicates how a child learns to read and write. Because their brains are wired differently, students with dyslexia are at risk of falling behind their peers.

A radio documentary by APM Reports - Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia -  highlights the challenges dyslexic students in Baltimore County face in getting the services they need. Producer Emily Hanford tells us how the great debate over how to teach reading is leaving kids behind.

And Pamela Guest, an advocate with Decoding Dyslexia - Marylanddescribes the frustration of watching her son struggle to read. Guest is also the editor of IEP Magazine.

After a devastating fire in March 2016, The Book Thing--a free book depot--is back! Founder Russell Wattenberg tells us about the path to rebuilding and how the community stepped up.

The Station North Tool Library Facebook page

Not-so handy around tools? No worries: the Station North Tool Library has tools and classes for every level of workshop experience. Co-founder Piper Watson tells about the 3,000 tools the library has on offer and the wide variety of its members. The first-ever Fix It Fair is October 21st from 11 am - 3 pm at 417 E Oliver St.

Wikimedia Commons

Five hundred years ago this month, the German monk Martin Luther challenged the practices of the Roman Catholic church, sparking the Protestant Reformation and shaping how Christians think and worship.

Bishop Denis Madden, of the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore, and Rev. Mark Hanson, of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, describe the dialogue aimed at reuniting their denominations.

And we speak to Yu Na Han, who curated an exhibit at the Walters Art Museum about Luther’s life as father, friend, and husband.

That was neurosurgeon Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa telling his stoop story about a special patient who, facing his fight against brain cancer, taught the doctor a important lesson about life. The story was part of a special stoop event: “Hopkins Medicine, A World Inside a City,” in May 2012. More stories at stoopstorytelling.com.

Project Bridge

YouTube

More than 300 million people across the globe don’t see the world with what is considered normal color vision. Today we meet glass scientist Dr. Donald McPherson, who accidentally discovered he could help those people. He’s the mind behind Enchroma glasses, designed to unlock color vision for those with color-deficient sight. We also capture the moment when local illustrator and art educator Jonathon Scott Fuqua tries the glasses for the first time. It changed the way he was used to seeing the world.

Macmillan Publishers

Having a successful African-American physician as a father and a white mother who read her the works of Black authors was no barrier against the racism Julie Lythcott-Haims faced growing up in white Wisconsin. In her new book, "Real American: A Memoir", she describes her journey to self-acceptance and insight about what it means to be Black in America.

Julie Lythcott-Haims will be speaking at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, tomorrow at 6:30 pm. Her “opening act,” will be Mohammad Tall, Youth Poet Laureate at Morgan State University, reading from his work.

United Way of Central Maryland Project Homeless Connect

A show about the power of human connections ... Scott Gottbreht of United Way of Central Maryland tells us how ‘Project Homeless Connect’  breaks barriers and provides urgently needed medical and dental care, and other services for the homeless and poor. It’s a two-day event at the Convention Center this week. 

MedSchool Maryland Productions

Academy Award winning documentary filmmaker Susan Hadary, from MedSchool Maryland Productions, talks about connecting with the six teens from the University of Maryland, Baltimore CURE program (Continuing the Umbrella for Research Experiences) in her documentary “From West Baltimore.” Also joining us is Shakeer Franklin, who reflects on life in his neighborhood.

Simon & Schuster

Ever wonder what your favorite authors wrote as kids? Author and creative-writing teacher Elissa Brent Weissman has collected their early writings in a new book titled, "Our Story Begins: Your Favorite Authors and Illustrators Share Fun, Inspiring, and Occasionally Ridiculous Things They Wrote and Drew as Kids".

Weissman and several other local authors, will discuss their new books on Saturday, 11 a.m. at the Barnes & Nobel in Ellicott City.

This Thursday at 4 pm, Gordon Korman, author of the Swindle series, Schooled, Ungifted, and the Everest series, will be speaking at The Children's Bookstore in Roland Park.

Brion McCarthy Photography LLC

The Stoop Storytelling Series has been delighting Baltimore audiences with true, hilarious and heartbreaking tales from ordinary people, since 2006. Stoop founders and hosts, Jessica Myles Henkin and Laura Wexler, join us to talk about themes for the new season. They include senatorial roasts, freaky families, the 1980s and excursions into the unknown. Find more details here!

Jen Pauliukonis / Marylanders to Prevent Gun Violence

"No more numbers. Say their names": that’s the motto of a new campaign by the nonprofit Marylanders to Prevent Gun Violence.

Behind the Statistics aims to build a personal connection through portraits and essays between the public and those devastated by gun violence. We speak to Jen Pauliukonis, president of the coalition, and Cynthia "KeKe" Collins, a member of Mothers of Murdered Sons and Daughters, whose 22-year-old son was killed in a shooting.

Then: University of Baltimore law professor Michael Meyerson describes the legal challenge facing Maryland’s assault-style weapons ban.

Miss Veteran America

Nearly 40,000 U.S. veterans are homeless, and within that group, the number of homeless female veterans is growing fastest. In many cases they are women with children. We talk with Veterans Affairs social workers Christopher Buser and Jackie Adams to learn how the VA is attacking the homeless vet problem in Maryland. First Major Jaspen Boothe, founder of Final Salute, Inc., and The Miss Veteran America competition, tells us why she’s dedicated to raising awareness about women vets who are homeless … and filling the gap of support available to them.

UMBC

One-on-one coaching, identifying students’ strengths and weaknesses, providing extra time to review skills. These are some of the tactics that Lakeland Elementary Middle School is employing, with help from University of Maryland-Baltimore County, to boost students’ math skills. We hear about this partnership from Lakeland Principal Najib Jammal, math teacher Katie Poist, and the assistant director of the UMBC Sherman STEM Teacher Scholars, Joshua Michael.

It’s been just over a year since David Cameron resigned from the British government, after six years as UK prime minister, and a decision by British voters to leave the European Union -- the Brexit vote, a shock to many. David Cameron will be in Baltimore this week for the Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University.

Scott Mosher / Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland has taken the EPA to court for failing to require power plants in five nearby states to control the air pollution they emit. Smog caused by these power plants is harmful to both public health and waterways. We discuss the lawsuit with Alison Prost, Maryland executive director for the nonprofit Chesapeake Bay Foundation

Amazon website

Baltimore is home to one of the country’s largest Jewish communities, and beginning tonight they’ll observe Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, the holiest day of the Jewish year. So today we look inside Baltimore’s Orthodox Jewish community, through the words of author Eli W. Schlossberg. He talks about his new book, “My Shtetl Baltimore, Stories and Recollections by a Native Son," a compilation of anecdotes about a lifetime in Baltimore.

pixcooler.com

Caring for patients with memory loss or dementia can be challenging for even the most attentive, well-meaning caregiver. We meet Jay Newton-Small, a journalist whose new business aims to improve the lives of seniors with a new online resource called MemoryWell; in it, writers tell the stories of those who can’t tell their own. We also hear from Bertina Hanna, head of a caregiving team that uses MemoryWell, about the impact it can have on working with patients.

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