Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Pages

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon May 4, 2015

Will Police Policies Change As A Result Of Charges Against Officers?

Credit Vladimir Badikov / Creative Commons

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby on Friday announced that her office would seek criminal charges against the six officers involved in the arrest of Freddie Gray. As the world now knows, Freddie Gray suffered a fatal spine injury while in police custody. We wanted to explore how the decision will shape police policies and culture. With me in the studio is Tyrone Powers, former FBI agent and Director of the Homeland Security and Criminal Justice Institute at Anne Arundel Community College.

Maryland Morning
8:50 am
Mon May 4, 2015

Freddie Gray Case: Legal Questions For Officers and Those Detained

Credit Susan Melkisethian// Flickr Creative Commons

  Even though there’s no break in the brilliant spring sunshine spilling over Baltimore and the rallies outside City Hall, in many ways the repercussions of Freddie Gray’s arrest and death have moved indoors.  To the courts. The most important next decisions--for the six police officers charged by the state’s attorney, as well as for hundreds arrested for looting and curfew violations--will be made by judges.  

So we’ve asked two lawyers to help us understand some of the legal questions raised in these cases.  David Rocah, senior staff attorney with the ACLU of Maryland, whose work has included litigation against the state police accused of spying on political activists, is with me in the studio. Joining us by phone is David Gray, professor of criminal law at the University of Maryland.  

Read more
Programs
8:45 am
Mon May 4, 2015

Is This Moment A Youth Moment? We Talk With One Teen

Darius Craig with his family in the Broadway East neighborhood.
Credit Jonna McKone

Last Friday in her press conference on the officers' charges, Marilyn Mosby stated, "to the youth, I will seek justice on your behalf. This is a moment; this is your moment. Let's ensure that we have peaceful and constructive  rallies that will develop structural and systemic changes for generations to come."

That was Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby last Friday, wrapping up her announcement of criminal charges against the police officers involved the arrest of Freddie Gray.

A few hours later, we talked with one of the young people Mosby was calling out to. Darius Craig is a senior at Digital Harbor High School, president of the student government there and the National Honor Society.  He organized a march last Tuesday

Read more
Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri May 1, 2015

Revitalizing West Baltimore, Post-Unrest

Credit Talk Radio News Service / Creative Commons

How will the unrest of the last week affect attempts to redevelop West Baltimore? We ask James Hamlin, a small business owner blocks south from the burned out CVS on North Avenue. Hamlin has run his bakery on Pennsylvania Avenue for years in an effort to revitalize the neighborhood. We also talk with the city’s former development chief Jay Brodie what it takes to persuade businesses to invest in the inner city. 

Read more
Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Can The Police's Relationship With Some Baltimore Communities Be Repaired?

Credit Matt Purdy

You’ve seen the pictures: an imposing row of police officers, shields out, riot helmets on, faces blank, their number stretching across a Baltimore neighborhood street. Across an invisible line, protesters stare back, their hands up. To most people, this is the image of police-community relations in parts of Baltimore City. Can this frayed relationship be repaired?

Chief Ganesha Martin is charged with the task of bringing police and the communities they serve together. She’s Chief of Community Relations for the Baltimore Police Department. She joins Sheilah in the studio.

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Analyzing Media Coverage Of Recent Events in Baltimore

North Avenue, not far from the CVS that was burned on Monday night.
Credit Matt Purdy

Media coverage nearly always changes what it is covering.  The questions asked, the frame drawn around an event or an issue not only transmit a view of that subject, but also influence how the news unfolds, what people in the news decide to do next, and how consumers of news interpret it.  

Sometimes the effect is subtle.  But a huge concentration of reporters can generate a huge effect.  At some points in Baltimore in the last ten days, journalists have outnumbered activists and protesters.  As curfew approached last night, and Democrat Elijah Cummings was using a bullhorn to urge  residents to go home, a Fox News  reporter trailed him with questions until – until the 7th-district congressmen turned to  him and his camera crew, “People are leaving,” Cummings said.  “You’re taking pictures of each other.”

For some insight into how all the attention -- from traditional media to social media -- is affecting understanding of Freddie Gray’s death and its aftermath -- we’re turning to an observer of media, and a practitioner.  With me in the studio is Lester Spence, associate professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins.  His most recent book is “ Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics." Also with us is David Rosenthal, the Baltimore Sun’s senior editor for investigations.  He edited the series last fall about police brutality in Baltimore, written by Mark Puente, called “Undue Force.” 

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Baltimore Cleans Up After A Dark Night

North Avenue at N. Carey
Credit Matt Purdy

After a dark night in Baltimore, the sun rose yesterday on a city intent on knitting itself back together. Hundreds of residents from across the city descended on the Mondawmin Mall area and Penn North neighborhood to clean up the devastation. We spoke with residents about their views of what triggered the violence, what might come of it, and what their hopes are.

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed April 29, 2015

What The 1968 Riots Can Tell Us About This Week

Volunteers worked to clean-up the burned-out CVS pharmacy at Pennsylvania and North
Credit Matt Purdy

What happened in Baltimore this week was nowhere near as extensive, destructive or deadly as the four days and nights of civil unrest that ripped through the city after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968. The toll then included six dead, more than 700 people injured, more than 5,000 people arrested, a thousand businesses looted, vandalized or burned, tens of millions of dollars in damage.

To help us review what we learned from the events of 46 years ago, and what we can learn from this week, we asked lawyer-historian-political consultant Larry Gibson to join us. He’s a professor at the University of Maryland Law School, author of the biography Young Thurgood and architect of dozens of successful campaigns for Democratic candidates. Larry Gibson joins Sheilah in the studio.

Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Wed April 29, 2015

What Youth Have To Say About The Unrest In Baltimore

People discussing at a Tuesday afternoon community meeting in Remington, Baltimore.
Credit Zeke Berzoff-Cohen/The Intersection

The day after riots shocked the city, several dozen people gathered for what was billed as a youth-led listening session called “Listen Up, Baltimore.”  It was organized by The Intersection, a non-profit that works with high-school students on leadership and college preparation. 

We sat down with three students who had taken  part in the community discussion, and asked them their thoughts on recent events in Baltimore. We hear from Dawnya Johnson, 18; Hassan Banks, 12; and Victorius Swift, 17. 

Read more
Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon April 27, 2015

What Is The Impact Of The Protests In Baltimore?

Saturday's protest at City Hall
Credit Nick Fountain, NPR

This afternoon, Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old Baltimore man who died a week after his spine was broken while in police custody, will be laid to rest at Woodlawn Cemetery, after a funeral service this morning at New Shiloh Baptist Church in West Baltimore. For more than a week, protesters have marched through the city, demanding to know what happened to Freddie Gray. The largest protest came on Saturday night.

Read more

Pages