Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Wed July 22, 2015

Fashion Magazines Are Rebranding Amid Digital Age

Credit www.dreamstime.com

There’s always a new trend afoot in the world of fashion, and for a long time, magazines have been the handbooks for the fashion-forward. Yet now, in the digital age, there are many more mediums that compete to deliver trendy looks to fashion-hungry consumers. The beautiful, glossy magazines that once told us about these fashion trends are rebranding as lifestyle guides.  Regular guest and style guide on Maryland Morning Zoey Washington sat down with Sheilah in the studio to tell us more about what's changing in the fashion world. 

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon July 20, 2015

Violent Crime and Community Policing In Baltimore

Credit Elliott Plack // Flickr Creative Commons

The numbers capture only part of the pain of the crime surge in Baltimore, but they are sobering. There have been twice as many shootings as this time last year, and homicides are up by 50%. As the Baltimore Sun reports 171 people murdered in the city this year, 27 of them this month. Interim Police Commissioner Kevin Davis is asking the rank and file for suggestions about how to reorganize the department.

Sheilah Kast discusses how the city can approach changes to its policing with Delegate Jill P. Carter, who represents north and west Baltimore, District 41. She has served on the Judiciary Committee since she was elected to the House in 2002, and she’s been outspoken on criminal justice issues.

Programs
8:45 am
Mon July 20, 2015

Young People Work To Bring Murals To Sandtown

Megan Lewis

Eighty young people have gotten summer jobs as "artist apprentices" in Sandtown in West Baltimore. It’s called Art @ Work: Sandtown. It’s an offshoot of Jubilee Arts’ year-round art programs for teens. This particular effort connects young people, aged 14 to 21, with master teaching artists to create seven murals and a mosaic in their community.

With Sheilah Kast to talk about the five-week program and its progress is one of the program’s teaching artists, Megan Lewis. Also with us are two of the artist apprentices: 18-year-old Eric Hendricks III lives in the Monroe neighborhood. He attended Frederick Douglas school. And 14-year-old Talia England. She lives in Sandtown, and graduated from Collington Square Middle school.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed July 15, 2015

Transit Alternatives To The Red Line In Baltimore

Credit www.aecom.com

In the three weeks since Gov. Hogan killed the nearly $3 billion-dollar light-rail project that would have connected east and west Baltimore, the city has been scrambling to figure out, what next?

Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford summarized what many planners are thinking when he suggested “Bus Rapid Transit.”  Rutherford told the Baltimore Business Journal last week, “I think rapid bus is the way to go – at least pilot the idea.”

In simplest terms, “bus rapid transit” is mass transit that runs high-speed buses on dedicated lanes of roads. But the term can mean different things in different settings, so we’ve invited two experts to tell us the key elements of “bus rapid transit,” why it works where it works, and what the potential problems could be.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed July 15, 2015

Rethinking Family Dispute Resolution

Credit NYU Press

In the last quarter-century, you could say the way we solve legal family disputes has been turned upside. It’s gone from confrontation toward collaboration, from the courtroom to the conference room. What’s expected of family-court judges has changed dramatically, as well as the roles of the lawyers who practice before them.

And it all has enormous impact on the increasingly diverse families – fewer and fewer of them bound in marriage – who come before the courts.

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