Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon August 10, 2015

Federal Crime Fighting Agencies Partner With Baltimore City Police

Credit Keith Allison // Flickr Creative Commons

 

We're starting the second week of a two-month partnership between Baltimore police and federal crime-fighting agencies.  Elected and law-enforcement officials announced with great fanfare last week that 10 federal agents would be embedded with Baltimore police homicide detectives in an effort to solve the scores of unsolved murder cases from recent months.

Agents from the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), the U.S. Marshals Service and the U.S. Secret Service will work with local police on cases where police have identified suspects but need more resources to file charges.  Joining Sheilah Kast to talk about the federal role in addressing the surge in violence in Baltimore is United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein, the top federal prosecutor in Maryland.

 

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Mon August 10, 2015

A Johns Hopkins Sophmore Killed And Older Driver Safety

Credit auntjojo // Flickr Creative Commons

You may remember the headlines of four years ago:  the brilliant Johns Hopkins sophomore, a computer major who cared about health and sustainable agriculture, bicycling in a bike lane on West University Parkway when a car turned right in front him.  The bicyclist, Nathan Krasnopoler, was pinned under the car.  But the 83-year-old motorist, apparently disoriented, did not turn the car off, or call for help.  She sat on a nearby wall, until a passerby intervened.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri August 7, 2015

Baltimore's Battle For Broadband

Charly Carter leads a group of demonstrators protesting Verizon's "red-lining" of Baltimore City.
Credit Fern Shen/Baltimore Brew

 

 

There’s fairly widespread agreement that access to reliable high-speed Internet is crucial to success. Businesses need it to deliver value to their customers. Students and teachers need it for effective education. Doctors and patients need it for quality health care. Researchers, police, elected officials, librarians, scientists  -- everyone needs it.

No wonder dissatisfaction is growing with how and where high-speed Internet is available in the Baltimore region -- fiber-optic networks surrounding the city, but almost none in it.  

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Fri August 7, 2015

A Pop Up Shop For Baltimore Manufacturers

Setting up for the Pop Up Shop.
Credit Andy Cook

Tomorrow, a group of craft manufacturers will open a new pop up store at 16 West North Avenue, just west of Charles showcasing locally made Baltimore goods. Two members of what’s called the Industrial Arts Collective, the alliance that helped start shop, are with me in the studio to talk about how the city can better support the growing number of small-scale manufacturers here.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Wed August 5, 2015

A Black Market Fish Poaching Scheme Gone Bad

Captain Billy Lednum stands on his boat, the Kristin Marie. He is now serving a one year sentence for poaching.
Credit Barbara Haddock Taylor/Baltimore Sun

The watermen of Tilghman Island had been harvesting perch, shad, oysters, herring and rockfish for centuries when ‘scientific fisheries management’  became a widely used tool for regulating fish harvest in the United States.  The idea is to manage annual harvests so aquatic species can be harvested in perpetuity.  In the late 1970's, the rockfish population was in crisis and Congress passed a law that imposed a moratorium on striped bass or rockfish.

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