Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

When Stephen Morgan showed up in 1969, guitar in hand, to be a camp counselor at what is now The Arc-Baltimore, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities often lived in institutions, seldom on their own. Children with mental disabilities were not entitled to free, appropriate public education. Morgan has been head of The Arc Baltimore for three decades, and has witnessed big changes. Ahead of his retirement next month, we talk about what kinds of jobs make sense for people disabilities, what prompts businesses to hire them and what police need to understand about them.

Judy Centers, named for late wife of Maryland Congressman Steny Hoyer, provide early childhood education and family support services at Title I schools across Maryland. We speak to Crystal Francis, coordinator for Baltimore City’s Judy Centers, about how the centers connect families to community resources, such as GED prep and utility assistance. And parent Keisha Thornton talks about the educational value of Judy Centers.

Courtesty Enoch Pratt Free Library website

When Union General Oliver Otis Howard was named right after the Civil War to head the Freedman’s Bureau, Howard was creating a new kind of government agency, one that would take an active role in solving the problems of freed slaves and poor whites in the former Confederacy. A dozen years later, with the Freedman’s Bureau disbanded, Howard went west. Aided by a bright young officer from Baltimore, Howard led the fight against Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce Indians in Oregon. In this program, historian Daniel Sharfstein introduces us to those characters, and traces the arc of change in how the U.S. saw its governing role as he discusses his new book, Thunder in the Mountains.

Special Collections and Archives / Goucher College Library

As the United States prepared to enter World War I, another battle persisted on the home front--winning the vote for women. What happened when young women at Goucher College protested outside the White House? And why did Maryland refused to ratify the 19th amendment? Goucher alumna Hannah Spiegelman takes us behind the scenes of an ongoing exhibit at Goucher about the picket. You can see pictures of the exhibit here. And writer Elaine Weiss, whose book about suffrage is to be published by Viking Press next spring, explains the tremendous obstacles impeding ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920.

Stories from The Stoop: Michael Singleton

Apr 28, 2017

Michael Singleton tells a tale about how his relationship with cooking defined his relationship to what he can call home. It was at a special Baltimore Museum of Art Stoop Storytelling in November 2015. 

Farmers Markets Celebrate Summer

Apr 28, 2017

There’s something that just shouts summer when the smells and colors of a farmer’s market envelope your senses on an early Saturday or Sunday morning as you wander through the just picked vegetables, fragrant flowers and fresh baked goods that fill the aisles. We look at two markets in Baltimore that have truly stood the test of time.

Lawyers in the Library

Apr 27, 2017
Maryland Legal Aid

Lawyers in the Library, a partnership between Maryland Legal Aid and the Enoch Pratt Free Library, grew out of the unrest in Baltimore City after Freddie Gray died from injuries received in police custody. ‘Lawyers in the Library’ gives convenient access to free legal advice right in the neighborhood.  Amy Petkovsek directs the Community Lawyering Initiative at Maryland Legal Aid and her client Shannon Powell, along with Melanie Townsend Diggs, manager of the Pennsylvania Avenue Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, talk about the genesis of the free legal assistance program and the difference its made it more than one thousand people's lives. To volunteer or find more information about Lawyers in the Library, visit Maryland Legal Aid or visit Enoch Pratt Free Library calendar.

Benjamin A. Skolnik and Elizabeth Pruitt / University of Maryland Hornbake Library

It was at the Wye Plantation near Easton that the boy Frederick Douglass first realized he was not free. University of Maryland archaeologists have meticulously pieced together clues about the daily lives of the African Americans owned by the Lloyd family -- the garden they designed, the kitchen crops they grew, the foods they cooked and their religious symbols reflecting African spirituality as well as Christianity. Professor Mark Leone gives us a tour of the exhibit “Frederick Douglass & Wye House: Archaeology and African-American Culture in Maryland.”

WYPR

The recent General Assembly session made significant changes in state law about sexual assault, and held back from some other changes. Lawmakers said the state no longer has to prove force in order to prosecute a rape charge; the legislature also gave survivors of child sex abuse more time to sue in court. They did not approve a measure that would have allowed courts, when a child is conceived through rape, to terminate the parental rights of rapists.

Baltimore Speakers Series website

The Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University wraps up its current season with an evening that delves into where America stands today on issues of race and reconciliation. Speaker Michele Norris, former host of NPR's All Things Considered and founder of The Race Card Project, offers a preview of Tuesday's discussion that she'll have with fellow speakers Jason Riley, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a columnist for the Wall Street Journal and Morris Dees, founder the Southern Poverty Law Center. You learn more about Michele Norris’s Race Card Project here and find information about the last evening of the 2016-2017 Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University here

Pages