Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon July 13, 2015

How Can Baltimore Reduce The Number Of Heroin Overdoses?

Credit JoshNV

Deaths by overdoses of heroin or prescription opioids in Baltimore are alarmingly more frequent: about 25% more people in the city died of heroin overdoses last year than in 2013, and the numbers are growing. State and local officials have been scrambling to figure out a way to stem the surge in overdoses. Baltimore City Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake convened a task force to study the problem and propose solutions. Those recommendations will be released later today. With Sheilah now to give us a preview of them is Baltimore City’s Health Commissioner, Dr. Leana Wen.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Mon July 13, 2015

Greece's Financial Crisis From The View Of Maryland-Area Residents

Parliament square in Greece.
Credit Spyros Papaspyropoulos // Flickr Creative Commons

As you’ve been hearing on NPR, European leaders have reached a deal to bail out Greece and keep it in the Eurozone, a deal that entails more austerity moves in Greece.

Diane Rehm will have more about the financial deal for Greece in the next hour.  For many in the Baltimore region, the financial crisis is not a distant headline, but something that affects their own families.   

George Koronios, grew up in Sparta, and came to the U.S.  when he was 16, four decades ago.  He’s a landlord and contractor. He, his wife Krista and their four teen-aged sons spent the last several weeks in Greece; George and his sons returned from Athens over the weekend, and he joins us by phone from their home in Ruxton. Also joining us is Constantine Triantafilou of International Orthodox Christian Charities, the humanitarian aid agency of the assembly of Orthodox Bishops in the United States.  It’s headquartered in Towson. 

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri July 10, 2015

Pastor Heber Brown III On The Firing Of Police Commissioner Anthony Batts

Heber Brown III

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake fired Police Commissioner Anthony Batts on Wednesday. Commissioner Batts had been under-fire since the April riots and the surge in violent crime that followed. The Mayor named Deputy Commissioner Kevin Davis, a veteran of the Prince George's County police department, who most recently served briefly as Police Chief in Anne Arundel County. He joined the Baltimore Police Department in January as a Deputy Commissioner.

Rebuilding community relations will be one of Interim Commissioner Davis’s most important tasks. With Sheilah in the studio to talk about how that can be done is Pastor Heber Brown III of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church. He led protests of police actions in the death of Freddie Gray.

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri July 10, 2015

Maryland's Complex Relationship To Representations Of The Civil War

Stonewall Jackson and Robert E Lee Memorial in Baltimore's Wyman Park.
Credit Photo Courtesy of Beau Considine // Flickr Creative Commons

The intense debate around South Carolina’s vote to lower a Confederate banner leads us to think about Maryland’s relationship to symbols of the Civil War.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed July 8, 2015

What Coppin State University's New President Will Focus On

Credit coppin.edu

Coppin State University traces its roots back 115 years to a one-year teacher-training course preparing African-American elementary school teachers for the classroom. From there, Coppin grew in Baltimore. In 1938, it began granting Bachelors of Science degrees and was named the Coppin Teachers College. Nearly 30 years later, it gave out its first Bachelors of Arts degrees and was renamed Coppin State College. In 2004, it became Coppin State University.

In recent years, Coppin State has struggled with financial management, poor graduation rates, and low morale. In 2012, Coppin’s faculty voted “no confidence” in then-president Reginald Avery; he resigned. An interim president has led the school since 2013, but as of July 1, the historically black university has a new leader: Maria Thompson, formerly the provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at the State University of New York at Oneonta, is the first woman to head the school. She joins Sheilah in the studio to talk about her plans.

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