Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Mon March 9, 2015

'Machiavelli: A Portrait' By Christopher Celenza

Credit Harvard University Press

It's been five hundred years since Machiavelli's masterpiece The Prince went to print, and his name is generally synonymous with cunning, expediency and bad faith. Christopher Celenza, Chairman of the Classics Department at Johns Hopkins University, recently authored a new book, Machiavelli: A Portrait. He will be speaking at the Ivy Bookshop Thursday evening at 7pm. We speak with Celenza about his argument that there’s more to the Renaissance diplomat and writer than the “unscrupulous” label we’ve fixed on him.   

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri March 6, 2015

Roundup Of Recent Oscar Wins

Still image from the film, Leviathan.

  Maryland Morning  movie mavens, Jed Dietz director of the Maryland Film Festival and Ann Hornaday, film critic for the Washington Post, talk with host Sheilah Kast about some of their Oscar favorites and what movies you should check out this weekend.

Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Fri March 6, 2015

A Black Market Fish Poaching Scheme Gone Bad

Captain Billy Lednum stands on his boat, the Kristin Marie, on his last day of rockfishing this season. He is now serving a one year sentence for poaching.
Credit Barbara Haddock Taylor/Baltimore Sun

 The watermen of Tilghman Island – population 854 – had been harvesting perch, shad, oysters, herring and rockfish for centuries when scientific fisheries management became a widely used tool for regulating fish harvest in the United States.  The idea is to manage annual harvests so aquatic species can be harvested in perpetuity.  In the late 1970s, the rockfish population was in crisis and Congress passed an law that imposed a moratorium on striped bass or rockfish.

These days the fish are at more sustainable levels and rockfish are again being fished – under rules that regulate the kinds of nets that can be used, the size of the fish, total weight of each haul, and the times of year they can be fished. 

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Maryland Morning
9:48 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Separate and Unequal: Efforts to Achieve Parity In Mental Health Care

Mental health rally in Philadelphia
Credit Liz Spikol

One out of five adults in the U.S. lives with mental illness and research shows that 40 to 50 percent of people with severe disorders like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are not receiving any treatment.  On average, people with serious mental illness die younger than others; some research points to two decades of lost life span.

A few weeks ago on this show we looked at the potential impact of cuts in the O’Malley and Hogan budgets that would affect reimbursements and salaries of behavioral health providers in Maryland. Today we’re digging into what access to mental health treatment looks like for consumers with insurance and at some of the concerns of providers themselves. 

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Remembering Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address

Abraham Lincoln delivers his Second Inaugural address.
Credit Alexander Gardner / Public Domain

One hundred fifty years ago, President Abraham Lincoln stood on the East steps of the U.S. Capitol and delivered one of the greatest speeches in American history: his second inaugural address. Many of us know the last part of it that begins: "With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in." That message of mercy is only part of what Lincoln packed into his brief 703 words. We've asked Richard Striner, professor of history at Washington College in Chestertown and author of several books about Lincoln, to discuss Lincoln’s second inaugural.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon March 2, 2015

The Cost Of Crime And Incarceration In One Baltimore Neighborhood

Sandtown
Credit Matt Purdy

A new report from the Justice Policy Institute and Prison Policy Initiative says that, as of 2010, 458 people from Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood or neighboring Harlem Park were in a Maryland prison. It's the largest number of any census tract in the state. We talk about it with Marc Schindler, Executive Director of the Justice Policy Institute. And, we visit two men in Sandtown who have been to prison and back. Antoine Bennett is the director of Men of Valuable Action, or MOVA. Anthony Warren is MOVA’s Community Service Project Coordinator.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri February 27, 2015

No Yellow Buses Here: One Student's MTA Commute

Children riding the MTA lightrail
Credit Lars Plougmann / Creative Commons

  

The yellow bus has long been an icon of public school systems, but in many big cities, tens of thousands of students make their way to and from school without the yellow bus. They navigate public transit. And more school systems are switching from yellow bus to public transit services to save costs. About 30,000 Baltimore City Public School students regularly ride the city bus to and from school. And, getting those kids to school on time can be difficult. Middle and high school students can apply to attend any school they want in the city regardless of how close it is to where they live. Producer Jonna McKone explores how much we know about youth transit patterns and the issues these young people face getting to school. 

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America

Credit Simon & Schuster

James Madison, James Madison. Fourth president. James Madison. What else springs to mind? One of those powdered-wig guys in knee breeches from revolutionary times. Something to do with the Constitution. War-of-1812 president. What else?

A whole lot else, fluently laid out in Maryland historian David O. Stewart’s latest book, Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships that Built America.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Government Transparency Advocates Push To Reform Maryland's Public Information Act

Credit Jon Newman / Flickr / Creative Commons

How do journalists bring important stories to light? Sometimes a a well-placed source spills the beans. Sometimes a whistle-blower comes forward. Another important way may be less familiar to you: Public Information Act requests. They allow a journalist, non-profit, a business, or anyone, to request information held by the state and local governments.  Maryland’s Public Information Act was enacted in 1970. That was before email, before desktop computers, way before thumb drives. It hasn’t seen a major update since then. But, some journalists and advocacy groups want to reshape it.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon February 23, 2015

150 Years Later, Bowie State's Transformation From A One-Room School

A classroom of fifth, sixth and seventh graders in the Demonstration School in the B.K. Bruce Building at Bowie Normal School (ca. 1930). The student-teacher is Joseph Alexander Wiseman. He would later became the founding director of the graduate division at Bowie State College.
Credit Bowie State University Archives

The educational institution we know as  Bowie State University celebrates its 150th anniversary this year. The university started as a one-room school house in Baltimore right after the Civil War and over 15 decades has evolved into a university of close to 6,000 students.  We’ll learn some of its early history – and why it moved from Baltimore to Bowie from archivist Katy Hayes, who’s with me in the studio.  But first, we hear from a woman who lived part of Bowie State’s history,  Beatrice Payne. She graduated from Bowie in 1928.  We visited Mrs. Payne a couple weeks ago. 

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