Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Mon November 10, 2014

"Living Hell: The Dark Side Of The Civil War"

Ahead of Veterans’ Day tomorrow, we’re reflecting on the experience of soldiers. A century and a half after the Civil War, our attempts to understand it may lead us to visit a preserved battlefield, which is now a park.  Or we may engage in a re-enactment, and get the feel of a rough wool uniform on a hot summer. Historian Michael Adams argues nothing we can experience today takes us anywhere close to the horror of the Civil War.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Mon November 10, 2014

Washington College Students Learn History Of World War II From The People Who Fought It

Sy Ellenhorn, interviewed by Washington College students
Credit Courtesy of Washington College

Sixteen million Americans served in World War II. More than one-million are still alive today, and 16,000 of them live in Maryland, according to the National World War II Museum. It has projected that by 2036, they will all be gone. A group of students at Washington College in Chestertown has been interviewing World War II veterans as part of an oral history project called "The Real War: World War II Veterans Remember”.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri November 7, 2014

Lawmakers On Working With Governor-Elect Larry Hogan In The Legislature

Credit Paul Simpson/flickr

Hours after the votes were counted this week, Republican Governor-elect Larry Hogan Jr. promised a bipartisan approach saying "It doesn't matter to me whether you're Republican or Democrat...we're all going to work together, roll up our sleeves, and work in a bipartisan fashion reaching across the aisle." Sounds great, but the General Assembly is still controlled by Democrats, big majorities in both houses.  How is their agenda going to mesh-- or not--with Governor Hogan’s? To start understanding the new dynamic in Annapolis, we’ve invited two leaders in the House of Delegates.  First, House speaker Mike Busch joins us on the line, then we hear from Republican Whip Kathy Szeliga.

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri November 7, 2014

How Ken Burns Tells A Story

Credit Creative Commons

Ken Burns has had an enormous impact, not just on filmmaking, but on how we understand our histories. He’s given us a long, deep look at the Civil War and World War II, the American pastime baseball, the American musical form jazz, and the people who have shaped our history, like the Roosevelts.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed November 5, 2014

How Larry Hogan Won Maryland

Larry Hogan, Maryland's next Governor.
Credit Courtesy of the Hogan Campaign

For only the second time in more than four decades, Maryland will have a Republican governor. Businessman Larry Hogan defeated Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and will take office in January. How did the Republican pull off a win in a state as blue as Maryland? Joining Sheilah in-studio to break down those questions is Charles Robinson, a correspondent for Maryland Public Television. Also with us in-studio is Bryan Sears, a reporter for The Daily Record and Mileah Kromer, Assistant Professor of political science at Goucher College. Todd Eberly, political science professor at St. Mary’s College, joins us by phone.   

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon November 3, 2014

Maryland's Agritourism Industry

Credit Liz West/flickr creative commons

Maybe you purchased the pumpkin that’s still on your doorstep or in your windowsill from a local farm. Hundreds of people flock to Maryland farms for pumpkins, hay rides, corn mazes…and soon enough some people may be heading to a tree farm to pick out a Christmas tree. These activities are all part of what’s known as ‘agritourism.' We wanted to take a few moments this morning to learn more about Maryland’s agricultural tourism industry. Mark Powell, Chief of Marketing and Agricultural Development for the Maryland Department of Agriculture joins Sheilah in the studio. 

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Mon November 3, 2014

"Maryland Geography: An Introduction"

Here on our show, we look at Maryland through the prism of its politics, its culture, its history, its communities. But, in the eight years the show has been on the air, we're not sure we’ve looked at it through the prism of its geography. We’re going to address that right now, with a conversation with James DiLisio. DiLisio retired after a stint as Towson University’s interim provost and vice president for academic affairs – and, more to our purpose, after nearly 40 years as professor of geography. DiLisio has just published Maryland Geography: An Introduction with the Johns Hopkins University Press, and he’s with Sheilah in the studio to talk about it. 

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Maryland Morning
9:30 am
Fri October 31, 2014

How Slavery Ended In Maryland

Credit Internet Archive Book Images/Flickr

In the summer of 1864, a year and a half after Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation declared slaves in the Confederate states to be free, a black woman named Annie Davis, who lived in Belair, in Harford County, wrote Lincoln a letter.  " Dear Mr. President, it is my desire to be free to go see my people on the Eastern Shore.  My mistress won't let me.  Will you please let me know if we are free?" It would not be until several months later, November 1, 1864 -- one hundred fifty years ago tomorrow -- that enslaved people in Maryland were declared free.  How did it happen?  And what happened next?  Two scholars of emancipation join us to talk about it.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Quilts As A Key To History

Mary Simon-Style Baltimore Album Quilt Top. Unknown maker.
Credit DAR Museum

A quilt is not only a thing of beauty, it’s a key to history – and to the personality of its maker.  From a quilt we might be able to guess at where the maker lived, and her station in life.  We can tell the maker’s favorite color, favorite fabric, favorite designs, and most of all--her artistry--not only her skill with a needle, but also her fine eye.  A new exhibition now up at the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Museum in D.C.—and online--seeks to tell us about the ‘maker’ herself.  It’s called “Eye on Elegance: Early Quilts of Maryland & Virginia,” and features more than 30 quilts made between 1790 and 1850. Alden O’Brien, the exhibit’s curator, joins Sheilah from her office at the DAR Museum. 

 

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Representing Unaccompanied Minors

Sheilah Kast and Adonia Simpson in the studio.
Credit Eric Seymour, Esperanza Center-Catholic Charities of Baltimore

It’s been a year since news reports started covering the large numbers of children crossing the U.S. border from Central American countries. It’s estimated that more than 55,000 unaccompanied minors have crossed the border since that time. And since January 2014, more than 2,800 minors have been placed with relatives or new caretakers in Maryland. In July, we examined why these children were coming to Maryland and we looked at the options that were on the table to house them. But now we want to ask what’s the next step for these children who are living in the state?

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