Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Pages

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri July 10, 2015

Pastor Heber Brown III On The Firing Of Police Commissioner Anthony Batts

Heber Brown III

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake fired Police Commissioner Anthony Batts on Wednesday. Commissioner Batts had been under-fire since the April riots and the surge in violent crime that followed. The Mayor named Deputy Commissioner Kevin Davis, a veteran of the Prince George's County police department, who most recently served briefly as Police Chief in Anne Arundel County. He joined the Baltimore Police Department in January as a Deputy Commissioner.

Rebuilding community relations will be one of Interim Commissioner Davis’s most important tasks. With Sheilah in the studio to talk about how that can be done is Pastor Heber Brown III of Pleasant Hope Baptist Church. He led protests of police actions in the death of Freddie Gray.

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri July 10, 2015

Maryland's Complex Relationship To Representations Of The Civil War

Stonewall Jackson and Robert E Lee Memorial in Baltimore's Wyman Park.
Credit Photo Courtesy of Beau Considine // Flickr Creative Commons

The intense debate around South Carolina’s vote to lower a Confederate banner leads us to think about Maryland’s relationship to symbols of the Civil War.

Read more
Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed July 8, 2015

What Coppin State University's New President Will Focus On

Credit coppin.edu

Coppin State University traces its roots back 115 years to a one-year teacher-training course preparing African-American elementary school teachers for the classroom. From there, Coppin grew in Baltimore. In 1938, it began granting Bachelors of Science degrees and was named the Coppin Teachers College. Nearly 30 years later, it gave out its first Bachelors of Arts degrees and was renamed Coppin State College. In 2004, it became Coppin State University.

In recent years, Coppin State has struggled with financial management, poor graduation rates, and low morale. In 2012, Coppin’s faculty voted “no confidence” in then-president Reginald Avery; he resigned. An interim president has led the school since 2013, but as of July 1, the historically black university has a new leader: Maria Thompson, formerly the provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at the State University of New York at Oneonta, is the first woman to head the school. She joins Sheilah in the studio to talk about her plans.

Maryland Morning
8:50 am
Wed July 8, 2015

Historic Expedition By Edward Braddock Traced Through Western Maryland

Credit Dave // Flickr Creative Commons

Before Interstate 68 paved a path through the forests of Western Maryland, and even before Highway 40 snaked its way through Maryland’s wooded hills and into Pennsylvania, there was another path West, blazed by a British general, Edward Braddock. In the summer of 1755, General Braddock set out from Fort Cumberland, at what is today the city of Cumberland, on his way to Pittsburgh to do battle with the French over control of North America.

Read more
Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon July 6, 2015

Free Range Kids: What Parenting Styles Are Valued?

Photo Courtesy of IAN//Creative Commons
Credit Courtesy of IAN // Creative Commons

In April, Montgomery County police picked up two children on their way home from a park in downtown Silver Spring. Their parents, Alexander and Danielle Meitiv, said they were unable to find their kids for more than six hours as their 10-year-old son Rafi and 6-year-old daughter Dvora sat in a police cruiser, then a police station and in the custody of county Child Protective Services. Charges of child neglect were dropped two weeks ago.  

But, the Meitivs’ situation sparked a national conversation about what parenting styles we value as a society. And it raised important questions about when parenting crosses the line from hands-off to irresponsible. 

Read more

Pages