Sheilah Kast

Host, Maryland Morning

Sheilah Kast has hosted WYPR’s Maryland Morning since it started in 2006. She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Fri August 7, 2015

A Pop Up Shop For Baltimore Manufacturers

Setting up for the Pop Up Shop.
Credit Andy Cook

Tomorrow, a group of craft manufacturers will open a new pop up store at 16 West North Avenue, just west of Charles showcasing locally made Baltimore goods. Two members of what’s called the Industrial Arts Collective, the alliance that helped start shop, are with me in the studio to talk about how the city can better support the growing number of small-scale manufacturers here.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Wed August 5, 2015

A Black Market Fish Poaching Scheme Gone Bad

Captain Billy Lednum stands on his boat, the Kristin Marie. He is now serving a one year sentence for poaching.
Credit Barbara Haddock Taylor/Baltimore Sun

The watermen of Tilghman Island had been harvesting perch, shad, oysters, herring and rockfish for centuries when ‘scientific fisheries management’  became a widely used tool for regulating fish harvest in the United States.  The idea is to manage annual harvests so aquatic species can be harvested in perpetuity.  In the late 1970's, the rockfish population was in crisis and Congress passed a law that imposed a moratorium on striped bass or rockfish.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon August 3, 2015

"English Only" Ordinance Hotly Debated In Frederick County

An Arizona road sign
Credit Thomas Hawk // Flickr Creative Commons

The state of Maryland doesn’t have an official language, but three of its counties do. The first was Frederick County. In 2012 its commissioners adopted an ordinance requiring, “all official actions in the county must be in English.”

Now Frederick is again debating the issue, quite vigorously. During the intervening 3 years, the county has changed its form of government; instead of a five-member board of commissioners, who were all Republican, it now has a seven member County Council of four Republicans and two Democrats. Two Democrats have proposed repealing the English-only ordinance. One of them is Jessica Fitzwater, who joins host Sheilah Kast in the studio.   And on the phone is Sheriff Chuck Jenkins, a Republican who is advocating for keeping the ordinance in place.

Maryland Morning
8:50 am
Mon August 3, 2015

Working Families And The Work Of Social Services In West Baltimore

In the 1990s Sociologist Patricia Fernandez-Kelly was a research scientist at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies when her research into what effects de-industrialization was having on city residents took her into West Baltimore.  She immersed herself in the lives of several families, working to understand their experience and in particular, the relation between them and government.

The result is the book Fernandez-Kelly published this spring:  The Hero’s Fight—African-Americans in West Baltimore and the Shadow of the State.  Patricia Fernandez-Kelly joins us on the line from Princeton University, where she’s now a senior lecturer in sociology.   

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Maryland Morning
10:12 am
Fri July 31, 2015

Next Steps After Governor Hogan's Announcement That The City Detention Center Will Close

Credit Blink Ofanaye // Flickr Creative Commons

The men’s detention center was built in East Baltimore before the Civil War.  Now it’s part of a cluster of more than a dozen public-safety buildings run by the state. Yesterday Governor Hogan called it dilapidated, dangerous, a place of corruption -- and said he’s closing it at once: "The individuals currently housed in the men’s detention center will immediately be moved to other facilities in Baltimore City or in nearby areas," Gov. Hogan said.  "There’s plenty of capacity elsewhere in the system to meet this need. Given the space that we have, it makes no sense whatsoever to keep this deplorable facility open.  Frankly, I cannot understand why this action didn’t happen years ago." 

Between 700 and 800 men awaiting trial will be moved; the governor said none of the 772 employees who work in the facility would lose their jobs. His announcement left unanswered many questions, including where the men would be moved to.

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