Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Instagram: @ShareaBabyMD / ShareBaby Baby Pantry

Babies go through dozens of diapers each week - an expensive but necessary purchase to keep infants healthy. But when families can’t make ends meet, they may resort to stretching out their supply. Social worker Eliseba Osore saw first hand the need for free diapers. Osore tells us how, as an Open Society Institute Community Fellow, she plans to expand her diaper bank into a free baby pantry - with clothing, furniture, and other supplies.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr via Creative Commons

In a little over two weeks, President-elect Donald Trump will become President Trump. As he ascends to the nation’s highest office, the media is doing a lot of navel gazing. Why did the press fail to predict his win? Is the media elitist, as many Trump supporters contend? And how should journalists deal with the rise of fake news? With us to discuss such questions is writer and cultural critic Lee Siegel. He is the winner of a National Magazine Award for Reviews and Criticism, and a regular contributor to the Columbia Journalism Review, where he’s written numerous articles about media in the age of Trump. He joins us from a studio at Montclair State University in New Jersey. 

Rachel Baye / WYPR

Even before the Maryland General Assembly convenes a week from today, some lines of conflict are clear: will Democrats override Republican Governor Hogan’s veto of legislation requiring more electricity to be generated by renewables, with a surcharge on customers’ bills? What spending cuts will Hogan propose to close the $400 million-dollar budget shortfall? Who will win the face off over how to choose which transportation projects get funded?

WYPR’s statehouse reporter, Rachel Baye, and The Daily Record’s government reporter, Bryan Sears, tell us how they think the session will shape up, and what may come of it.

A study by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds depression growing among adolescents in the United States, particularly girls. From 2004 to 2014, the number of young people who experienced an episode of depression grew by 30 percent, with 1 in 6 girls reporting a bout of depression in the past year. Study leader and professor of mental health, Dr. Ramin Mojtabai says more research is needed. Then, preventing and spotting depression in teens. Hopkins psychologist Tamar Mendelson tells us what behavioral changes parents and teachers should look for.

Start with racism and sexism. Mix in religion, politics, and money. Then add a room full of strangers. That may sound like a dicey recipe for open and honest conversation, but JC Faulk has crafted a thoughtful way to approach these hard subjects. It’s called Circle of Voices. Since January, about 2,000 people from across Baltimore have participated in conversations facilitated by Circles of Voices. Now, JC Faulk has been named one of this year’s Open Society Institute Baltimore’fellows. Like the nine other fellows, he’ll will receive $60,000 over the next 18 months to fund a local project. The nonprofit Open Society Institute focuses on addressing the needs of Baltimore’s underserved communities and supporting innovative solutions to longstanding problems. 

Deborah Ramsey didn’t fit the profile of the typical applicant when she joined the Baltimore Police Department decades ago. She was in her 30s, a mother. Deborah knew she loved Baltimore. her hometown, and that she was a people-person. She approached her police job with these strengths in mind. Working as a patrol officer and later a detective, she saw people in both their worst and best moments, dealing with the sudden death of a family member, or celebrating the return of a missing child. Now Deborah Ramsey has been awarded one of this year’s ten Open Society Institute Baltimore fellowships. Each fellow will receive $60,000 over the next 18 months to fund a local project. The Open Society Institute is a nonprofit that supports efforts to address problems in Baltimore's underserved communities, from mentoring young people to criminal justice reform. 

Painting, poetry, photography, sewing, even songwriting. These are some of the arts activities that Gianna Rodriguez and the organization Baltimore Youth Arts bring to young people across Baltimore.

Courtesy of Holistic Life Foundation

A nonprofit called the Holistic Life Foundation has been bringing mindfulness, yoga, and meditation into Baltimore public schools for nearly 15 years. Suspensions and detentions appear to have dropped as a result, and some kids have really taken the practice to heart. We hear from the co-founder of the Holistic Life Foundation, a student who has since become a teacher in the program, and a researcher who studies school-based mindfulness programs.

The priest who would become Pope Francis impressed his Jesuit superiors in Argentina from early on, taking on more responsibilities, sure of himself - until it became apparent that he had divided the Jesuit community - and he was sent away to a kind of internal exile that lasted two years. Mark Shriver, nephew of President John F. Kennedy, head of an international lobby network for children, former Maryland state legislator, discusses his new biography of the 266th pope. It's titled, “Pilgrimage: My Search for the Real Pope Francis.”

Children in foster care may bounce around to different placements and different schools. But some of Maryland’s 4,700 foster children can count on a court-appointed volunteer to be a dependable presence in their lives. How does that work? We’ll hear from a volunteer, a mother whose son she worked with, and Ross DiEdoardo, executive director of the nonprofit CASA of Harford County

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