Stephanie Hughes

Senior Producer, Maryland Morning

Stephanie Hughes is the senior producer for “Maryland Morning,” WYPR's daily news magazine show.  She's covered issues including business, housing, and women's rights, and is interested in citizen journalism and crowdsourcing.  She’s also contributed to media outlets including NPR’s “Morning Edition,” “All Things Considered,” “Marketplace,” “The Takeaway,” and Salon. 

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Programs
9:00 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Research, Resources and Portrayals

Conor Wade and Alisa Rock.
Credit Alisa Rock

In our show on Autism Spectrum Disorders, Sheilah Kast first talks with writer and parent Alisa Rock, whose son Conor has autism. She also talks about research and resources with Dr. Rebecca Landa and Dr. Li-Ching Lee. Then, Tom Hall talks with Anthony Baker, English professor at Tennessee Technological University, about portrayals of autism in the media.

1 in 68 U.S. children have an Autism Spectrum Disorder. In Maryland, 1 in 60 children are on the Spectrum.

These statistics were released last month in a report conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.  In the second part of this interview, we’ll hear from Dr. Li-Ching Lee, the School’s principal investigator for that report and Dr. Rebecca Landa, of Kennedy Krieger.  But first, we want to get a picture of what it’s like for one family who has a child with ASD, an Autism Spectrum Disorder. 

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Maryland Morning
8:40 am
Mon April 14, 2014

The Evolution of Stokely Carmichael

Credit Basic Books

Sheilah Kast speaks with Peniel Joseph, Tufts professor and author of " Stokely: A Life."

Stokely Carmichael’s name comes down to us from the civil rights struggle, and even most of us who recognize his name attach it to just part of his thinking and legacy. We learn more about Carmichael from a new biography by Tufts professor Peniel Joseph.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Author James McBride, on Making History Accessible

Author James McBride

Tom Hall talks with author James McBride.
National Book Award winner James McBride will be at the CityLit Festival in Baltimore this weekend.  His latest novel "The Good Lord Bird," depicts famous abolitionist John Brown.

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Maryland Morning
12:36 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

How to Bridge the Gender Pay Gap

Senator Barbara Mikulski of Maryland speaking at a press conference for the Paycheck Fairness Act.

 

Sheilah Kast talks with law professor Deborah Eisenberg about the gender pay gap.

President Obama signed an executive order yesterday that is intended to help even out the gender pay gap.   It would require federal contractors to allow employees to share salary information with each other.  

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Maryland Morning
9:45 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Taking Time to Just Be

Loyola psychologist Robert Wicks.

Sheilah Kast talks with psychologist Robert Wicks.

Dr. Robert Wicks is a clinical psychologist on the faculty of Loyola University Maryland. In his latest book, "Perspective: The Calm Within the Storm," he writes about ways to approach thinking, meditation, and the narratives we tell ourselves about our lives.

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Maryland Morning
10:00 am
Tue April 8, 2014

As Session Ends, Lawmakers Increase Minimum Wage, Create New System for Medical Marijuana

Credit Compfight

Sheilah Kast recaps the final days of the General Assembly with WYPR Statehouse reporter Chris Connelly and The Washington Post's Jenna Johnson.
The population of Annapolis has gone down this morning.  Maryland state senators and delegates are home, or heading home.  In the legislative session that ended at midnight, they raised the minimum wage to $10.10/hour by 2018 and expanded the school day for some pre-schoolers.  
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Maryland Morning
10:00 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Why Southern Maryland and the Eastern Shore are Facing Off over Wind Development

A proposed wind development in Somerset County is pitting Southern Maryland lawmakers against those from the Eastern Shore.
Credit Compfight / lamoix

Sheilah Kast talks with Baltimore Sun environmental reporter Tim Wheeler about bills passed by the legislature affecting the environment.
  It’s Sine Die, the last day of the 2014 General Assembly in Annapolis.  This morning, we look at some of the bills that the legislature has passed that affect the environment.  

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Maryland Morning
8:40 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Films for Spring: A Band, A Vermeer, and an Arc

Jennifer Connelly as Naameh and Russell Crowe as Noah in NOAH.
Credit Paramount

Tom Hall talks with Jed Dietz of the Maryland Film Festival and Ann Hornaday of the Washington Post about movies to watch this month.

  Ann Hornaday, film critic for The Washington Post and Jed Dietz of the Maryland Film Festival, join us to discuss the must-see movies for April.

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Maryland Morning
9:23 am
Wed April 2, 2014

How Labor Trafficking Looks in Maryland

Farmworkers are a population that's vulnerable to labor trafficking.
Credit Flickr / amira_a

Sheilah Kast talks with Sheena Wadhawan about labor trafficking in Maryland.

Labor trafficking is the use of intimidation, threats, and sometimes violence, to force people to work against their will. The national non-profit Polaris Project, and others working to prevent trafficking, say certain populations are especially vulnerable, such as immigrants; they may be working legally in the US, but their legal status is tied to a particular employer.  

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Maryland Morning
8:30 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Author David Shipler on "The Working Poor"

A scene from "The Consumables" at CCBC.
Credit Freyphotographic.com

Tom Hall talks with author David Shipler and director Julie Lewis on CCBC's theater piece "The Consumables"

There’s a program at the Community College of Baltimore County’s Essex Campus called the Community Book Connection.  Students and staff at CCBC read a book, and throughout the year, the college presents events related to the themes of that book.  The book they chose this year is "The Working Poor: Invisible in America" by the Pulitzer Prize winning author David Shipler.  It paints portraits of people who are for the most part employed, but constantly navigating that terrifying space where there is never quite enough to get by.  

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