W. Brooks Paternotte | WYPR

W. Brooks Paternotte

Host, The Nature of Things

W. Brooks Paternotte took the helm of Irvine Nature Center as executive director in July 2013 and immediately began building on the strong 35-year foundation.  Brooks is a Baltimore native who was a teacher, coach, advisor, dean and Head of the Middle School during his 13 years at Boys’ Latin School in Baltimore.  He is also an instructor and ambassador of the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) and is a Leave No Trace Master, as well as an avid outdoorsman and a features writer for FlyLife Magazine.

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Canada Geese

Sep 20, 2016
SHAWN NYSTRAND/Flickr Creative Commons

You might be able to ignore the increasing amounts of leaves falling from trees, or the suddenly sinking nighttime temperatures. But when you hear the noisy, distinctive honking of a v-shaped flock of Canada geese as they migrate above you, there is no denying that autumn has arrived.    

Mint

Sep 13, 2016
James Jardine/Flickr Creative Commons

Over the weekend, my daughter Emma and I picked a posy of flowers for her mom. I was helping her tie a ribbon around the bunch when Emma stopped to pulled one green stalk out from the tiny bunch. She eyed the base of the stem curiously.

“This one’s square,” she told me, looking puzzled.

I took the greenery from her hands to confirm. She was right – though my expectation was for the stem to be round, this one was very clearly square. It had simple leaves that were opposite each other and smelled divine. We went straight to a plant book for some answers. In it, we learned quickly that if you pick a plant with a distinctly square stalk, then it is very likely a member of the mint family.

Andy Powell/Flickr Creative Commons

I always feel like I’m in a hurry. I hastily speed to work for a fast meeting. Then the kids need to get to soccer practice, stat. I fly home to let the dogs out—chop, chop, chop. I inhale a quick dinner while I’m on the run. And I hit ‘send’ on a rapid-fire text to a colleague about a task to bang out ASAP. Before I can blink, it seems, I’m racing to get back home for not-quite-enough shut-eye.

But a lot of animals live life in no hurry at all. Take slugs and snails, for example. They live luxuriously without a rush. For them, it’s a life in the slow lane. 

A snapping turtle's prehistoric appearance makes it an easy local species to identify.  It's an impressive reptile with a large head and a strong, hooked beak that makes it resemble a toothless yet ferocious old man.  

Cicadas

Aug 23, 2016
WAYNE THUME/Flickr Creative Commons

Sitting outside on my patio this weekend, my attempts at reading the Sunday paper were thwarted by an unmistakable, buzzsaw-like song.

I could hear, but not see, the culprit. With my kids at my heels, I ascended a nearby pine tree to pinpoint the noise and locate its source. Just a few limbs up, my son found a stout, one-inch long, black-and-green insect loudly calling out. My daughter knew it instantly. It was a cicada.

Pollination is something that’s happening in the natural world 24 hours a day. Its ordinariness might be why we forget how vital it is to our everyday lives.

The transfer of pollen from the male part to the female part of a flowering plant is essential to life on earth, for without pollination we would not have enough food. Over 90 percent of all known flowering plants, and almost all fruits, vegetables and grains, require pollination to produce crops. And since one out of every three bites of food we eat each day requires pollination to make it to our plate, we are indebted to the creatures that perform this critical service.

Porcupine

Aug 9, 2016
TRACEY BARNES, SMITHSONIAN'S NATIONAL ZOO

My family and I recently headed to Deep Creek Lake for some largemouth bass fishing. And although we caught and released some sizable fish, the highlight of our vacation was seeing a North American porcupine eating bark from a sugar maple along the side of Interstate 68.

The presence of porcupines in Maryland came as a surprise to me and my wife, but we have since learned that our state’s western counties have a regular population of these nocturnal rodents.  

Red Foxes

Aug 2, 2016
Anthony Adams/Flickr Creative Commons

There is a very clever animal that lives near my house. It’s so cunning, it knows to wait until my 3 Labradors are inside the house before coming onto my property. And it has a penchant for my chickens.

I could be quick to say that this fox has become my nemesis, with its maddening habit of sneaking in and stealing my egg layers. But the shrewdness with which this fox has outsmarted my chickens, my dogs and even me makes me hold his ingenuity and abilities in high regard.

Bird Boxes

Jul 26, 2016
Rick Leche/Flickr Creative Commons

Each day when I arrive at Irvine, birds busily flit between the many nest boxes that line the long driveway. These small wooden boxes provide essential nesting locations for many cavity-dwelling birds like eastern bluebirds and chickadees. And this year, Irvine inserted a camera into one of the boxes to get an up-close look at what’s going inside. I’m excited to have Irvine’s Director of Education, Robert Mardiney, with me in the studio today. Rob is a master naturalist and has monitored the box-visiting birds this season. 

Nutria

Jul 12, 2016
Henri Sivonen/Flickr Creative Commons

With the exception of my kids after those messy, artificially flavored orange popsicles, there’s only one animal I can think of that has orange teeth. While some people might be turned off by this critter’s hairless, rat-like tail, it’s actually the teeth that stick with me.

The hooked, stubby, Tang-colored fangs protrude forward prominently. They are long, sharp and perfect for eating marsh plants.

And they belong to an animal called the nutria.

Cowbirds

Jul 5, 2016
Rodney Campbell/Flickr Creative Commons

Last month, a friend of mine posted a photo of a local bird's nest onto Facebook. The caption read, "one of these things is not like the other," and the image featured 4 robin's-egg blue eggs alongside one larger white egg with cocoa-colored speckles.

“Not like the other,” indeed.

The outlier belonged to the brown-headed cowbird, a smallish, stocky blackbird with a fascinating approach to raising its young. Cowbirds are our area’s most common brood parasites, meaning that they make no nest of their own and instead lay eggs in the nests of other avian species.

Lightning Bugs

Jun 28, 2016
Terry Priest/Flickr Creative Commons

As a child, the first time I saw a firefly was magical. I distinctly remember the way its seemingly weightless body felt after I captured it in my hands. And the way it revealed itself with a yellowish green light like a tiny firework. Then, just as quickly, disappeared into the summer’s evening skies.

Peter Miller/Flickr Creative Commons

Butterflies of all kinds can be found flitting across our listening area’s woods, fields, yards and gardens. In fact, Maryland has more than 150 species of these winged wonders. Brooks wits down with Laura Soder, Irvine’s coordinator of its native Butterfly House, to chat about butterflies

Box Turtles

Jun 7, 2016
Michael Mulqueen/Flickr Creative Commons

Driving on a quiet back road this Sunday, I rounded a slight curve and hit the brakes. In the middle of the road was a ball-cap-sized animal stranded near the double yellow line. I knew immediately it was a turtle in need.

Glenn Euloth/Flickr Creative Commons

One of the most popular questions I overhear at Irvine’s comes from every age group. Our Nature Preschoolers ask it. High school-aged visitors on field trips ask it. Moms and dads coming in to hike the trails ask it. And then right on their heels, seniors from our area garden clubs ask it too.

What’s the difference between frogs and toads?

Mantids

May 24, 2016
Jason Bolonski/Flickr Creative Commons

Last June, my son Jack and I were wandering through the fields behind our home, when Jack came bolting toward me with his latest nature find.

Atop his finger was a tiny, green, kneeling insect peering at me through large eyes on its triangular head. Its miniscule, yet still prominent, front legs were held together at an angle that nearly looked like they were in reverence to some greater power. I knew immediately what it was: a juvenile praying mantis.

Loblolly Pines

May 17, 2016
Ildar Sagdejev

This time of year, I love kayaking through the calm waters of Maryland’s tidal rivers and wetlands. There’s something special about our Chesapeake Bay’s blue-green inlets, briny air and abundant wildlife that make me feel like I’m home. But there’s something else I love to see while I’m paddling too: the view of hundreds of towering loblolly pine trees.

Lady Beetles

May 10, 2016
John Flannery/Flickr Creative Commons

Over the weekend, I was in my garden and saw one of nature’s own pest controllers. It was my first ladybug of the season and I was really lucky, as it was a native species, called a ‘convergent’ ladybug. The tiny, beautiful insect was an orangey-red half-sphere with 13 bold black spots and had its trademark stubby legs and roving antennae.

Ticks

May 3, 2016
Peter Dickson/Flickr Creative Commons

There may be no bug creepier than a tick.

These sesame-seed-sized parasites crawl slowly and silently up our bodies, surround their mouth-parts in our skin, and then casually slurp their fill of our blood until their bodies expand like tiny water balloons.

So as you carefully pluck a tick from your skin, you may undoubtedly wonder: what purpose could they possibly serve? What good are ticks, exactly?

Dandelions

Apr 26, 2016
Kamil Gopaniuk/Flickr Creative Commons

Just this weekend, my young daughter Emma brought my wife a tiny bouquet of flowers. There were some nice greens, and many more bright yellows. The arrangement would be familiar to any parent, as it was a bunch of sweet, sun-loving dandelions.

Mike Beauregard/Flickr Creative Commons

Maryland is one of only 8 states that have designated a state dinosaur. We were the 5th state to do so, after Colorado and New Jersey started a trend in the 1980s and 90s. But only Maryland has the astrodon as its prehistoric symbol.

A hundred and 40 years before our state chose the astrodon, Maryland’s agricultural chemist Philip T. Tyson was producing the area’s first geologic map of Maryland. His work brought him Prince George's County and he did some digging in an open-pit iron mine. There, he discovered our region’s first dinosaur fossils.

Woodcocks

Apr 5, 2016
Rodney Campbell/Flickr Creative Commons

Recently, I turned to a book by one of my conservation heroes, Aldo Leopold. In a favorite passage of mine, Leopold found himself quite taken with one of our native birds, the humble woodcock. After seeing their acrobatic mating flights, he wrote that the American woodcock is “a refutation of the theory that the utility of a game bird is to pose gracefully on a slice of toast.”

Jason Ferrell/Flickr Creative Commons

Most of our native trees are preparing to sprout their 2016 crop of leaves. Only a few weeks ago, they were barren and covered in snow. But soon there will be an explosion of new life.

It’s amazing. How does it happen?

Over-simplified, plants need water, light, warmth and soil to grow. During spring, they get all the conditions they need. Frequent showers give them the water they require. Longer days mean they have more daylight and warmth from the sun. But there’s more to it than just that.

Robins

Mar 15, 2016
Eric Ellingson/Flickr Creative Commons

With all of this winter’s snow, we’re all seeking harbingers of spring.

And soon we’ll be hearing the tell-tale cheery song of one my favorites: the American robin.

The quintessential early bird, robins are North America’s largest thrushes. They are distinctive for their warm orange potbellies, long legs and fairly long tails. They are common sights on lawns across the continent, where you can often see them tugging earthworms out of the ground.

Sturgeon

Mar 8, 2016
Virginia State Parks

Just imagine this.

There. At the bottom of the river.

There’s a 7-and-½-foot-long, 170-pound, armor-covered behemoth. Its brown, sandpaper-like hide has sharp bony plates along its back. Its fins are large, and its tail is just like a shark’s. And its dark eyes regard you suspiciously as it flexes its blubbery, sucker mouth and the catfish-like whiskers on its chin. The giant prehistoric-looking animal uses its snout to root around the sandy Chesapeake Bay bottom before lumbering away.

For some of us, this would be a reason to call the authorities about a slow-moving water dinosaur loose in the Bay. But for any Maryland naturalist, it would be an incredible reason to celebrate.

Unmistakably, you’d have just seen an Atlantic sturgeon, thought perhaps extinct from Chesapeake Bay waters. But in the last few years, scientists have found them still living in the Bay. Naturalists around the state have been cheering on their resurgence. There’s reason to hope that this creature can rebound and again become a plentiful part of our waterways.

River Otters

Mar 1, 2016
Kevin Schofield/Flickr Creativ Commons

I’ve been to Gunpowder Falls State Park hundreds of times. I’ve gone canoeing through quiet streams, hiked miles upon miles, and fished throughout its narrow corridors. Each time I go, I hope to see an amazing, but elusive, animal that’s on most naturalists’ version of a bucket list. The remarkable ‘water acrobat:’ the river otter.

Chipmunk

Feb 23, 2016
Gilles Gonthier/Flickr Creative Commons

On my weekly nature walk through the forest last Thursday, a small set of four footprints in a muddy divot caught my attention. Irvine Nature Center’s naturalists and I took an up-close look and we concluded that the tracks were from an eastern chipmunk.

And even more peculiar, we were quite positive that the tracks are from a male chipmunk. 

“How,” another staff member asked our group, “can you possibly tell the sex of an animal just from what you see in this mud?” It was, of course, a great question.

Feeding Wild Birds in America

Feb 16, 2016

We have long been fascinated with the history of the wild birds in our country, so we're excited to get writer and educator Margaret Barker in the studio for a conversation. Margaret is a Chesapeake Bay native with an interest in watching birds. She and her colleagues Paul Baicich and Carrol Henderson just published a book called Feeding Wild Birds in America: Culture, Commerce and Conservation

Horia Varlan/Flickr Creative Commons

Last week my 7-year-old son Jack came home from a field trip to our National Aquarium. He was ecstatic after seeing the baby loggerhead turtle up close and would not stop imitating the droning noises of the puffins and razorbills. He also came home with a whole new set of facts, including one that really surprised me.

“Plastics,” he told me, “take more than 1,000 years to biodegrade.” I had not realized it was quite this long. And when I did the math I realized that virtually every piece of plastic that has ever been made still exists in some shape or form on out planet.

Laszlo Ilyes/Flickr Creative Commons

Humans have long been envious of the flying squirrel.

Skydivers and base jumping enthusiasts have even developed flying suits that mimic the squirrel’s peculiarly square shape. These “wing suits” work to slow the jumpers’ descents and allow them to maneuver through the air – just like flying squirrels. The Smithsonian even tested flying squirrels – built from tiny pieces of steel and fiberglass – in a wind tunnel and found that these mammals can glide up to an astounding 30 miles per hour.

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