A Blue View

Tuesdays 5:45 pm

A Blue View is a weekly perspective on the life aquatic, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.  From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

Tune in to 88.1 WYPR every Tuesday at 5:45 p.m. as John brings to the surface important issues and fascinating discoveries making waves in the world today.


Perhaps you are familiar with the saying “an albatross around your neck.” This phrase, coined by the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, in his 1798 poem, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, refers to the association of the albatross with bad luck, mishap, struggle and worry.


Ever feel the tangle of seaweed around your ankle when wading in the water? For many beachgoers, it is enough to send them scrambling for shore.


At $15,000 a pop, a quart of horseshoe crab blood is valuable, but its riches are far greater than a price tag. The crab’s unique blood holds tremendous worth in the medical community—and for each of us.


If you’ve ever wondered whether it’s possible to make a positive difference for the environment amid all the doom and gloom we hear about every day, the answer is a resounding yes. Need proof? Here it is: The osprey.


The East Coast faced a deadly adversary in October 2012: Hurricane Sandy swept through 24 states, leaving over $68 billion of damage in its wake. It was a reminder of just how powerful Mother Nature can be.


The great white shark has long been feared as one of the sea’s deadliest apex predators. At an average of 15 feet in length, weighing up to 5,000 pounds and sporting about 300 serrated teeth, it’s no wonder these creatures have a notorious reputation.


Cascading tendrils of blue-green tentacles and a translucent, neon bell give the Portuguese man-of-war its otherworldly appearance.


Sharks have earned a nasty reputation for being vicious, human-hungry predators of the seas. The fact that some of them average 15 feet in length, weigh up to 5,000 pounds and have mouths lined with up to 300 razor-sharp teeth doesn’t do much to fight the stigma.


For many, summer means cookouts, beach trips, park trips and other kinds of outdoor activities, but for many urban kids, nature's very much an unknown quantity. In fact, the notion of the great outdoors is changing-and with it, what it means to be out in nature.


For some people this is a life philosophy; for oceanographers, it describes the very dynamics of our global ocean.