A Blue View | WYPR

A Blue View

Tuesdays 5:44 PM

A Blue View, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.  From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

Summer is prime time for gardening and sprucing up our lawns—but what we do to our yards impacts our waterways more than you might expect. As we go about planting this season’s flowers, trees, produce and herbs, it’s important to keep the health of our watershed in mind.

The combination of ice melting and thermal expansion in the ocean means that sea level rise is not just a possibility…it is happening now, and the only question is how fast it’s going to rise. 

Ever feel the tangle of seaweed around your ankle when wading in the water? For many beachgoers, it is enough to send them scrambling for shore.

A common decorating theme for beach houses and shore hotels, sea stars, sand dollars and sea urchins signify summer vacation.

Sand dunes, those soft summertime beach-sights that can be scaled in flip-flops and dune buggies, are coastal geology that evolve in real time.

Take a walk on your local shoreline and you might be lucky enough to spot a blue heron fishing for its next meal or sand crabs disappearing back into the sand after being exposed by a crashing wave.  But while these creatures might be the ones to catch your attention, many of our watershed’s more overlooked inhabitants are playing an equally critical role in maintaining this complex ecosystem.

The colorful Black-Eyed Susan and the sweet-smelling magnolia are just two of the many stunning flowers and trees native to the Chesapeake Bay region.

Its eye is the size of your head. It lives more than 3,000 feet deep in oceans around the world and is 30 feet long, yet it lacks a backbone. With eight arms and two tentacles, it is the origin of the myth of the Kraken.

The Chesapeake Bay is a playground in the summer, with people using this amazing natural resource for fishing, boating, even simply enjoying a relaxing day on the beach along its shores.

Seahorses, sea dragons and pipefish are among the most flamboyant fish in the ocean.

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