A Blue View | WYPR

A Blue View

Tuesdays 5:44 PM

A Blue View, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.  From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

Most of us probably believe that we do a pretty good job of picking up after ourselves, but the reality is that trash does in fact make its way into our streets, our communities, or shores, and our waterways. To help critical habitats in the Chesapeake Bay area, the National Aquarium's Conservation Team regularly hosts cleanups where Aquarium staff and volunteers pick up what others left behind.

For many parents, raising a child to appreciate the natural world is a priority. And the good news is that the cultivation of this environmental awareness can start from a very early age.

As a world-renowned marine photographer, award-winning filmmaker and dedicated environmentalist, Bob Talbot uses the power of film to advocate for the ocean.

Historically, Atlantic White Cedar forests were common to the Eastern Shore.  Over time, these trees were harvested and the swampy areas they depend on for survival were drained and replanted with fast growing loblollies as part of the forest industry to produce lumber and paper pulp. 

Far south of the Chesapeake, fringing tropical and subtropical coastlines, there exist floating forests of mangroves, whose roots grow in a luxuriant tangle at the ocean's edge.  And there, they thrive. Botanists call the 50 species of mangroves halophylic, or "salt loving."

Blue as sapphires, red as rubies and black as onyx—there are more than 100 species of beautifully colored poison dart frogs. There is even one called "the blue jeans frog," because its bottom half is the color of denim.

One of the most challenging environmental issues in communication across Maryland and in communities all over the world is polluted runoff. As solutions are considered and implemented, what is clear is that we have to do something.
 

Did you know that every species of sea turtle in US waters is endangered? Preserving these amazing and essential sea creatures is of the utmost importance.

Through the winter, woodlands and meadows are mostly quiet at night. But with the arrival of spring rains and warming temperatures, that silence is broken by loud choruses of wood frogs and spring peepers. These are the first frog species to come out of hibernation and begin the year’s amphibian breeding season.

The phrase “impervious surface” is used by city planners, developers, real estate agents, lawyers, and citizens in Maryland and beyond.

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