A Blue View | WYPR

A Blue View

Tuesdays 5:44 PM

A Blue View, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.  From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

aqua.org

Zooplankton, the microscopic invertebrates consisting of small animals and the immature stages of larger animals, move up and down the water column in a type of migration called diel vertical migration.

pbs.org

Need an icebreaker for your next dinner party? Here’s one you can share while nibbling hors d'oeuvres: “Did you know your skull and head is organized like an extinct jawless fish?” Take your philtrum, for example. That’s the groovy indentation on your top lip just beneath your nose.

aqua.org

"This is the ship of pearl, which poets feign, sails the unshadowed main / and its dim dreaming life was wont to dwell /as the frail tenant of its growing shell." Oliver Wendell Holmes described this remarkable creature in his 1858 poem “The Chambered Nautilus.”

It's easy to think of science as clear, clean and linear - the progressive accumulation of information driving a steady increase in our understanding of the world.  But, in truth, it's messy.  There are fits and starts. Bafflement. Wrong turns. Dead ends.  Head-scratching questions that defy answers. There are also a lot of happy accidents, often made by people not even in science - as the workers on an oil and gas rig off the coast of Angola discovered in August of 2015.

nytimes.com

If you had to guess the most common vertebrate on the planet, you might say deer or squirrels. Maybe mice or factory-farmed chicken? Even humans? 

 

aqua.org

Earth’s ice is expansive. In fact, 10 percent of the planet’s land mass is covered in ice—like glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets—spanning more than 5 million square miles. 

Wikipedia

The sea lamprey looks like the stuff of nightmares. An eel-like fish with a suction-cup mouth, 100-plus teeth and file-like tongue, it’s easy to imagine it searching the ocean, bays and lakes for its next meal.

cbf.org

Large, silvery-brown, snout-nosed, scute-covered, prehistoric-looking Atlantic sturgeon have been swimming the seas and coming up East Coast rivers to breed since dinosaurs roamed the Earth.

climate.org

You’d have to drive from California to New York and back—TWICE—to fully appreciate the distance traveled by the gray whale every year. This species takes the credit for longest migration route of any mammal, traveling 12,000 miles from the icy waters of the Arctic to the warm lagoons of Baja, Mexico, and back again.

Wikipedia

We have five senses; ask any schoolchild and they can rattle them off on the fingers of one hand: hearing, taste, smell, touch and sight.

Pages