A Blue View

Tuesdays 5:45 pm

A Blue View is a weekly perspective on the life aquatic, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.  From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

Tune in to 88.1 WYPR every Tuesday at 5:45 p.m. as John brings to the surface important issues and fascinating discoveries making waves in the world today.

Wikipedia

For some people this is a life philosophy; for oceanographers, it describes the very dynamics of our global ocean.

aqua.org/blog

Did you know? One out of every three bites of food you eat comes from pollinators. Without them, we wouldn’t have foods like blueberries, apples, chocolate and almonds.

aqua.org/blog

An initiative of the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore, the Healthy Harbor Report Card tracks the progress being made toward a swimmable, fishable future for our Inner Harbor.

In the Mud - 6/2/15

Jun 2, 2015
aqua.org/blog

Don’t be deceived by the desolate look of a mudflat. These areas of mud or sandy mud, which line thousands of miles of Chesapeake Bay shoreline, are hiding a rich variety of life.

aqua.org/blog

With the right gardening strategies, you can create your own certified wildlife habitat around your home or somewhere in your community.

aqua.org/blog

Hidden just beneath the surface of the Inner Harbor in five distinct locations is a new type of garden: an oyster garden.

These installations are the product of the Great Baltimore Oyster Partnership, a collaboration between the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, local businesses and area schools.

aqua.org/blog

Today, little of our planet’s land is dark at night. The starry hubs of cities and ports and vein-like outgrowths of the well-lit suburbs cover the surface of the Earth. The planet may be "a pale blue dot," as Carl Sagan has said; but at night, we're bright. Too bright. 

Wikipedia

You’ve probably heard of the Galapagos Islands, an archipelago of 19 islands deep in the Pacific Ocean. A UNESCO World Heritage site, the Galapagos are 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador, and a world apart from the rest of the planet.

aqua.org/blog

When Captain John Smith first explored the Patapsco River in 1608, it was ringed by natural wetlands that provided habitat to native wildlife and filtered the water. It may be hard to imagine, but before Baltimore became a thriving seaport, the Inner Harbor was likely a vibrant wetland, its surface adorned with green vegetation.

aqua.org/blog

Manatees made headlines this winter when a group of them, including a mother and calf, became marooned in a Florida storm drain and had to be rescued by marine biologists with backhoes and earth-moving equipment. Why such heavy machinery?

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