A Blue View | WYPR

A Blue View

Tuesdays 5:45 pm

A Blue View is a weekly perspective on the life aquatic, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.  From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

Tune in to 88.1 WYPR every Tuesday at 5:45 p.m. as John brings to the surface important issues and fascinating discoveries making waves in the world today.

Wikipedia

The sea lamprey looks like the stuff of nightmares. An eel-like fish with a suction-cup mouth, 100-plus teeth and file-like tongue, it’s easy to imagine it searching the ocean, bays and lakes for its next meal.

cbf.org

Large, silvery-brown, snout-nosed, scute-covered, prehistoric-looking Atlantic sturgeon have been swimming the seas and coming up East Coast rivers to breed since dinosaurs roamed the Earth.

climate.org

You’d have to drive from California to New York and back—TWICE—to fully appreciate the distance traveled by the gray whale every year. This species takes the credit for longest migration route of any mammal, traveling 12,000 miles from the icy waters of the Arctic to the warm lagoons of Baja, Mexico, and back again.

Wikipedia

We have five senses; ask any schoolchild and they can rattle them off on the fingers of one hand: hearing, taste, smell, touch and sight.

livescience.com

When it comes to biodiversity, the Amazon is practically unrivaled. Spanning 6.7 million square kilometers, this South American region is twice the size of India and houses at least 10 percent of the world’s known species. Twelve hundred new species of plants and vertebrates were discovered between 1999 and 2009 alone.

Wikipedia

Tridacna gigas, the giant clam of the Indo-Pacific, is the largest bivalve mollusk on Earth and the world's only sun-powered clam. It hosts a thick layer of zooxanthellae in its tissues and gets up to 90 percent of its nutrition from their photosynthesis.

aqua.org

Where does your seafood come from? You may be thinking about your favorite restaurant or your local grocery store. But the fact is, some seafood takes a circuitous route to get from the sea to your plate, and along the way can get a little, well, lost.

www.nationalgeographic.com

Its eye is the size of your head. It lives more than 3,000 feet deep in oceans around the world and is 30 feet long, yet it lacks a backbone. With eight arms and two tentacles, it is the origin of the myth of the Kraken.

www.seafoodwatch.org

We talk a lot about being “sustainable,” but what does it really mean? Tj Tate, director of sustainable seafood at the National Aquarium, is here today to talk about this sometimes misunderstood term, and what it means in the seafood industry.

marylandbiodiversity.com

When it comes to biodiversity of plants and animals, the number of species typically increases as you move from the colder temperate zone to the warm tropics. The epicenter of salamander diversity, however, exists much further from the Equator—in fact, it’s here.

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