The Checkup: How Health Care Is Changing In Maryland | WYPR

The Checkup: How Health Care Is Changing In Maryland

Tuesday Mornings at 9:00 am on Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast

Why are premiums rising for health insurance? How does the online marketplace work?  Does Maryland have enough doctors?  Join us Tuesday mornings when we tackle questions raised by the Affordable Care Act in our series, The Checkup: How Health Care Is Changing in Maryland.

The Checkup is made possible by CareFirst Blue Cross Blue Shield, The Baltimore Association of Health Underwriters, and Healthcare Access Maryland.

Jamyla Kay

Every year more than 50,000 refugees and asylees enter the United States, and hundreds resettle in Maryland. 

On today’s edition of The Checkup, we hear from refugees and service providers about the changes to refugees' healthcare and the unique health challenges that many face.

Shepherd's Clinic in Baltimore.
Matt Purdy

750,000: That was the estimated number of Marylanders without health insurance as the Affordable Care Act began to rollout. That number has dropped by about 148,000. As of mid-January, about 25,000 people had signed up for private insurance and about 123,000 had gotten Medicaid, the government coverage for certain low-income Americans. One of those people is 53-year-old Baltimorean, Hal Reinhardt. Matt Purdy talks with him about how he got treatment for his diabetes and bipolar disorder while uninsured.

Credit: Alex Proimos / Flickr / Creative Commons
Credit: Alex Proimos / Flickr / Creative Commons

The federal government is giving Maryland the okay to try a new approach to hospital care.  It’s going to change how often people are admitted to the hospital and how hospitals get paid. State officials say the new plan puts the emphasis on keeping people healthy. We hear from Health Secretary Joshua Sharfstein and Carmela Coyle of the Maryland Hospital Association.

Credit: a.adrian / Creative Commons
Credit: a.adrian / Creative Commons

 

More than 110,000 Marylanders began getting their health coverage through Medicaid on January 1st. That’s almost six times the number of Marylanders who signed up for private coverage. On The Checkup, we talk about how Medicaid is changing health care in Maryland and other states.

Credit: Compfight / Creative Commons
Credit: Compfight / Creative Commons

The Affordable Care Act requires that insurers provide 45 preventive services to patients free of charge.  What does this mean for the health of individual patients?  What it could mean for the future health of the U.S., as a society And how much is it all going to cost?

A screenshot of the Maryland Health Connection, after we tried to log in.
A screenshot of the Maryland Health Connection, after we tried to log in.

The director of Maryland’s online health exchange resigned on Friday. On the Checkup, we talk about the challenges the exchange faces and possible solutions.

Small businesses line Main Street in Annapolis. Credit: Mr. T In DC / Flickr / Creative Commons
Small businesses line Main Street in Annapolis. Credit: Mr. T In DC / Flickr / Creative Commons

The federal online health insurance exchange has delayed its start for small businesses until November 2014. But, Maryland’s on-line marketplace will start selling insurance to small businesses in April, as scheduled. How will rates for small businesses change? Today, on The Checkup, we talk about that with Frank Kelly, Jr., founder of a big insurance brokerage in Maryland.

Credit: tschörda / Flickr / Creative Commons
Credit: tschörda / Flickr / Creative Commons

On The Checkup: how is mental-health care changing under Obamacare? WYPR’s Mary Rose Madden has investigated, and shares what she’s found.

Credit: United Workers / flickr / Creative Commons
Credit: United Workers / flickr / Creative Commons

In order to get a better understanding of how Maryland is reaching out to minority populations around the state, we hear from several people engaged in this issue, including Congressman Elijah Cummings and outreach leaders on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, in Western Maryland and in Baltimore City.

Credit: Alan Cleaver / Flickr / Creative Commons
Credit: Alan Cleaver / Flickr / Creative Commons

A quarter of all Americans will deal with a substance abuse issue at some point in their lives. Of those, only about 11-percent will get treatment. The Affordable Care Act may change that. It requires that all insurance plans cover treatment for substance abuse.

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