Elections | WYPR

Elections

Local election coverage from WYPR programs and newsroom.

Information on registering to vote.  Find your polling place here.

  The six major Democratic candidates for Mayor squared off last night in the final televised debate before the April 26 primary. However, the rules of the debate kept the candidates from questioning each other, which allowed the frontrunner to escape virtually unscathed. 

    

Fraser Smith and Luke Broadwater, of the Baltimore Sun, talk about the newspaper's latest poll, which gives state Senator Catherine Pugh a clear lead in the race to be Baltimore's next mayor, and the attack ads that followed.

Welch under fire in challenged ninth district

Apr 13, 2016

  

William “Pete” Welch has represented the 9th district, which includes West and Southwest Baltimore, on the city council since January 2011.  He was appointed to finish the term of his mother, Agnes Welch, who retired in December 2010 after nearly three decades.

Two challengers – John Bullock and Jerrell Bratcher – accuse Welch of not doing enough for the district.  There are three other challengers in the April 26 Democratic Primary; Nathaniel Anderson, J.B. Kenney and Shawn Key.

  Two of the major Democratic candidates for Mayor aggressively attacked each other’s records on crime Wednesday a debate on WYPR’s Maryland Morning, while a third tried to stay above the fray.

Sheila Dixon for Mayor, David Warnock, John Brecher

*On April 13th Nick  Mosby announced that he is suspending his campaign for mayor. Mosby has endorsed State Sen. Catherine Pugh. 

Beginning April 14th, Baltimore City residents will have the opportunity to cast their votes in the crowded 13-person race for the Democratic nomination for Mayor of Baltimore. 

There have been dozens of mayoral forums held throughout the city, many of which offered a platform to most, if not all, of the candidates. While it’s important to consider the views of everyone running, the sheer volume of people on stage has made it difficult for any candidate to explain their vision in a thoughtful and unhurried way.

Maryland Morning invited the top three Democratic candidates in the most recent poll to participate in a live in-studio debate. The poll, published in March, was commissioned by the Baltimore Sun and the University of Baltimore's College of Public Affairs and Schaefer Center for Public Policy and was conducted by Opinion Works.

According to the poll, State Senator Catherine Pugh leads with 26 percent of likely voter support, followed by former Mayor Sheila Dixon with 24 percent. Businessman David Warnock comes in third with 10 percent support. The top three are followed in the polls by Nick Mosby( 6 percent), Elizabeth Embry (5 percent) and Carl Stokes (3 percent).

Seven other candidates registered below 1% in the Sun/UB survey.

After originally agreeing to come, Senator Pugh canceled, citing obligations in the Senate. Sheila Dixon, David Warnock and Nick Mosby join Tom in-studio for an hour-long debate on the issues that seem to matter most to voters: crime, education, economic development and racial inequality.

Citizen Trueheart challenges President Young

Mar 30, 2016

Bernard “Jack” Young was made Baltimore City Council President by his colleagues in 2010 when then-President Stephanie Rawlings-Blake became the mayor.  Winning his own term in a landslide the following year, Young is running for re-election.

Amanda Wood / Flickr Creative Commons

Wednesdays are the day here at Maryland Morning that we concentrate, in particular, on politics. This morning we begin with a conversation about what the experience of voting will be like across Maryland when we enter the voting booth either as an early voter from April 14-21, or as a voter on Primary Election Day, April 26th.

Either way, we’ll be asked to choose delegates to the Democratic and Republican Presidential conventions, nominees from both parties for the US Senate and Congress, and here in Baltimore City, nominees for Mayor and the City Council. We'll also choose judges. If you've been paying attention, none of that will come as a surprise. But here's what you may not know: When you head into the voting booth this time, you'll notice big changes in the mechanics of voting. For one thing, we'll be using paper ballots, because of a 2007 decision by the Maryland legislature. 

Sorting Out Baltimore's Busy City Council Races

Mar 30, 2016
Wally Gobetz, Flickr Creative Commons

Have you looked over your sample ballot yet?  If you have, and you're a registered Democrat or Republican, you'll see you have a lot of choices to make in the upcoming primary election on April 26th.  Besides the Presidential, US Congressional and Senate races, 13 Democrats are on the ballot for Baltimore Mayor, a list that does not include incumbent Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake.  And for the City Council, nearly half of the seats are open, which is to say that the incumbent isn’t running for re-election.   Luke Broadwater covers City Hall for the Baltimore Sun.  P. Kenneth Burns is WYPR's political reporter.  They join Tom this morning to make some sense of some of the more than 100 candidates running for seats on the City Council.   

The Baltimore City Sitting Judges Campaign

Next month, Baltimore City voters will be asked to elect judges to the 8th Circuit Court. Of the eight candidates, six are sitting judges running in what’s known as a retention election. 

The sitting judges -- Shannon Avery, Michael DiPietro, Karen “Chaya” Friedman, Cynthia Jones, Audrey Carrión and Wanda Keyes Heard – were appointed by former Governors after being recommended by a non-partisan commission. The judges are campaigning as a block, although they will not be identified as “sitting judges” on the ballot. Last week, the two candidates not appointed by a governor, Todd Oppenheim and James Kraft, were on the program. Sitting Judges Shannon Avery and Cynthia Jones join Tom to discuss how they were appointed and why they deserve to keep their seats.  

We’re just five weeks away from the April 26th Maryland primary election.  In the last primary for Mayor, in 2011, voter turnout was among the lowest in history.  Does this portend a troubling trend?  Former Maryland Secretary of State John Willis, now a resident scholar at University of Baltimore's School of Public and International Affairs, studies the history of elections, and voter behaviors.  He's had a wealth of experience in the field.  As secretary of state from 1995 to 2003, he was involved at the state and national levels in election reform issues. He chaired Maryland's Special Committee on Voting Systems and Election Procedures, which led to landmark election reform legislation in 2001.   Sec. Willis also served on the commission which modernized and recodified Maryland's election laws. He joins Tom to discuss current trends in voting behavior, and what factors could affect voter turnout on April 26th.  

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