Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories | WYPR

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories

Friday 7:46 am and 9:38 am

Gilbert Sandler is one of Baltimore's most-read and well-known local historians. For more than thirty years, through his articles in the Baltimore Sun, the Baltimore Jewish Times, National Public Radio and his books and lectures, he has shown Baltimoreans, through anecdote and memory, who they are, where they have been and, perhaps, where they are going. He was educated in Baltimore's public schools and graduated from Baltimore City College; in World War II, he served in the United States Navy as a ship-board navigator in the Pacific. He is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and has a master's from Johns Hopkins.

Archive prior to December 2014.

Clockwork

Jun 2, 2017
bromoseltzertower.com

On July 7, 2007, Baltimoreans whose habit it was to look up nine stories to the top of the Bromo Seltzer tower to check the time on one of its four clocks --  facing east,  west, north, south—were bewildered. The clocks were out of sync, one with the other, and showing different times. The story--when Baltimoreans didn’t know the time of day!

Haussner's

May 26, 2017

On the afternoon of December 18, 1999, watched anxiously in auctioneering house in Timonium, as the auctioneer rattled off the artifacts for sale from the once and famous and now defunct Haussner's restaurant - weeks earlier a reigning queen at Eastern Avenue and Conkling streets. In the end the memories of thousands of lunches and dinners and of millions of dollars of artwork and 73 years of Baltimore times winds up in a ball of twine - on display in an antique shop on Fells Point.

​This episode originally aired March 2016.

Women Jockeys

May 19, 2017
Karen Hosler/flickr

On the afternoon of May 18, 2013 at the Preakness at Pimlico, a horse named Mylute came in third. She was ridden by Rosie Nepravnik—the only female jockey in this race. How a woman jockey got be right in there with all the male jockeys, in what was historically, an all-male society, is a Baltimore story. 

Betsy

May 12, 2017
Paul Kurlak/flickr

In October of 1955, Reuter’s Moscow newswire was crackling: A painter of genius had just been discovered in America. The artist-subject, a Baltimorean, had been soaring to fame and recognition world-wide; for the originality of her paintings. When the word came out revealing at long last who she was, this same admiring audience was stunned. Who was she?

Birds, Sox, Hex

May 5, 2017
Ian S/flickr

On a day in late September, 1975, two men sat in the cockpit of small plane about to take off from BWI Airport for a four day trip to Nairobi in Africa and back.  They were off on a strange and historic mission: to get a witch doctor to put a hex on the Boston Red Sox. What is this weird story all about? 

In 1938, Baltimoreans crowded Dundalk ave. and welcomed the American hero and aviator, Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan. Baltimore Mayor, Howard W. Jackson, staged the event to promote the city and, in particular, Baltimore's hot steamed crabs.

Eli Hanover

Apr 21, 2017
J Dimas/flickr

Eli Hanover was a grizzled, ex-boxer who ran a gym over the Jewel Box Night Club down on the old and now infamous Block in East Baltimore. He had a dream: to train the boxers who would make Baltimore America’s center for boxing. Fighttown Baltimore, he called the dream. But it never happened. The dream died with the dreamer. 

fly/flickr

In the 1950,s in the days when there were two Baltimore’s—one white and the other Black, there were two Easter Parades. For the white community, Charles Street; for the African American, Pennsylvania Avenue.. The high fashions for the high occasion came almost exclusively from the Charm Center fashion store; and Avenue Easter Parade strollers agreed; you couldn’t have the parade without the store.

Easter Parade on Charles Street

Apr 7, 2017
ulo2007/flickr

Up until the late 1950s there was, every year going back nobody really knows how far, an Easter Parade on Charles Street. It started at the Washington Monument, and ended on 33rd Street, and 1959 turned out to be the last year for it. The story of the decline and fall.

Organ Grinders

Mar 31, 2017
Maryland Historical Society

Up through the 1940s Baltimoreans knew it was spring when they saw the organ grinders and their monkeys appear suddenly on the street corners of downtown. One such organ grinder was Luciano Ibolito, and his monkey’s name was Julia. And this is the story of how together they would usher spring in Baltimore.

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