Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories

Friday 7:46 am and 9:38 am

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories is made possible in part by The Ivy Bookshop.

Full Archive of Baltimore Stories.

An unknown artist living in a broken down house on a little-traveled street decided to paint the front of his house pastel blue. He stunned his neighbors, started a city-wide trend and changed the look of the city.

After a gifted, young African American singer from Baltimore landed the part of "Bess" in George Gershwin's opera "Porgy," the opera was renamed "Porgy and Bess." She was that good. Along the way, the history of American music changed, too.

During WWII, Baltimore's Penn Station was a busy, frenetic point of arrival and departure for thousands of servicemen and women.  The station had a lot going on within it - including perhaps what was the first wedding ever to be performed in a railroad station.  A lot of soldiers and sailors got to kiss the bride!  

Two ex-baseball players sitting in a duck blind on the Eastern Shore, see a flight of ducks take off and scatter upwards.  The moment proved inspirational, and brought into being "duckpin bowling".  It changed an industry and a national pastime. 

Gone With The Wind

May 2, 2014

Lexington Street, between Charles and Liberty streets was one of Baltimore's busiest, boasting a department store and three theaters.  One theater was The Century - where the Baltimore premiere of "Gone With The Wind" was shown.  It turned out that this busy and storied street with all its memories, would, like the era depicted in the movie, be a victim of time - and, be "gone with the wind...".    

The story of the very first radio station to broadcast in Baltimore is lost in the dustbin of Baltimore history - never to realize the full recognition it deserved.  That's because the father of the young builder of the station threw the station out - his son's most promising and historic creation!   

Abe Sherman's (unsightly, some thought) newsstand was located in the pocket park on Calvert Street at Lexington Street. City Hall leadership thought Abe's shack-of-a-newsstand didn't fit into the new Baltimore renaissance and started a war to have him and his shack removed.  But Abe fought back - and won. 

When President Franklin Delano Roosevelt died in 1945, his funeral train passed through Baltimore's Penn Station - but only a few people were allowed to stand trackside and bid final farewells.  Among the onlookers was Congressman Thomas D'Alesandro, Jr and 12-year-old Franklin Delano Roosevelt D'Alesandro.  

When Congressman Tommy D'Alesandro, Jr. married Nancy Lombardi, Little Italy - where they were both born and raised - became one vast, day long party of wining and dining.  A little too much of it caused Tommy and Nancy to change their honeymoon plans!  

In 1946, Hochschild Kohn's department store decided to install automated elevators - dismissing the operators, management thought, forever.  But when the automatic elevators were installed and the operators dismissed, the management was in for a very big surprise. 

Pages