Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 9 a.m - 10 a.m.

We find the most intriguing voices to take you behind Maryland headlines. Find out more about us, check out shows that aired prior to February 2014, listen to our series, and listen to each day's show.

Got a question or comment? E-mail us at mdmorning@wypr.org. You can also leave us a voicemail or text us at (410) 881-3162.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed May 6, 2015

What Movies To Check Out At The Maryland Film Festival

The Maryland Film Festival kicks off tonight and runs through Sunday. It's 125 films in 4 days. The Festival's Jed Dietz and Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday give us a preview.

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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Wed May 6, 2015

New Trainings On Stopping Citizens Legally For Baltimore Police

Police line at North Avenue
Credit Matt Purdy

On April 12th, Baltimore police officers made eye contact with Freddie Gray at North Avenue and Mount Street. Gray ran, the police chased, and you know the rest of the story: the 25-year-old Gray suffered a spinal injury while in police custody and died a week later. Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, in announcing charges against the officers on Friday, said the officers did not have probable cause to arrest Gray.

Even before the Freddie Gray case, the state’s attorney’s office wanted Baltimore police to bring more expertise in deciding when and how to stop someone on the street (or in a car), and what makes a valid arrest. The city has approve $50,000 to put 300 police officers through 12 hours of training. The lawyer who created the training, Byron Warnken, joins us by phone to talk about it. He’s a University of Baltimore Law Professor and the senior member of Warnken, Attorneys At Law, which he founded with his wife.

Maryland Morning
10:00 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Multiracial Organizing, After Freddie Gray

A sign at Saturday's curfew protest in Hampden. Courtesy Casey McKeel.

Sheilah talks to Lawrence Brown, an assistant professor in community health and policy at Morgan State University, about the role of race in policing--and in protesting. 

 Dr. Brown was at Pennsylvania and North Avenues Saturday night when protesters not only broke the curfew, but turned the curfew to their advantage. As the world watched, protesters wanted to show that some parts of Baltimore are policed very differently than others. So several dozen mostly white protesters broke the curfew in the mostly white neighborhood of Hampden. Activist Deray McKesson posted a video of a police officer giving the Hampden protesters their last warning not long after the 10 p.m. curfew.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Tue May 5, 2015

West Baltimore And The Shadow Of The State

Credit Baltimore Heritage//Flickr Creative Commons

Over the last two weeks, as protests of how police treated Freddie Gray spread from Baltimore to other cities and claimed national media attention, much of America that had known nothing about West Baltimore, began to learn about it. One observer in New Jersey didn’t need an introduction.

In the 1990s Sociologist Patricia Fernandez-Kelly was a research scientist at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies. Her research into how de-industrialization was affecting city residents took her into West Baltimore. She immersed herself in the lives of several families, working to understand their experience and in particular, the relation between them and government.

The result is the book Fernandez-Kelly published this spring: "The Hero’s Fight—African-Americans in West Baltimore and the Shadow of the State". Patricia Fernandez-Kelly joins us from Princeton University, where she’s now a senior lecturer in sociology.

Maryland Morning
8:50 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Theater Review: Romeo and Juliet

It’s the most famous love story of all time. “Romeo and Juliet” has been re-told, spun off, updated and reimagined as: A story about warring street gangs in New York, rival religious factions in Baghdad, garden gnomes, even zombies. At Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, director Ian Gallanar tells it straight – in Elizabethan dress and as Shakespeare wrote it (with some cuts). For a play this well known, playing it safe could be risky – too familiar, not adventurous enough.  
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Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Public Health In Baltimore After The Unrest

Workers clean-up in and around the burned-out CVS at the corner of Pennsylvania and North
Credit Matt Purdy

The looting and destruction of the CVS pharmacy at North and Pennsylvania avenues became one of the indelible images of the unrest last week. It will also have a lasting impact on the Penn-North neighborhood. Residents who need prescriptions filled have had to find somewhere else to go. Baltimore’s Health Department has been aiding residents in locating new pharmacies and overseeing public health efforts post-unrest. With Sheilah to talk about it is Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City’s Health Commissioner.

You can find out information about pharmacy closings, mental health services, and healthcare access at the Baltimore City Health Department website.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon May 4, 2015

Will Police Policies Change As A Result Of Charges Against Officers?

Credit Vladimir Badikov / Creative Commons

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby on Friday announced that her office would seek criminal charges against the six officers involved in the arrest of Freddie Gray. As the world now knows, Freddie Gray suffered a fatal spine injury while in police custody. We wanted to explore how the decision will shape police policies and culture. With me in the studio is Tyrone Powers, former FBI agent and Director of the Homeland Security and Criminal Justice Institute at Anne Arundel Community College.

Maryland Morning
8:50 am
Mon May 4, 2015

Freddie Gray Case: Legal Questions For Officers and Those Detained

Credit Susan Melkisethian// Flickr Creative Commons

  Even though there’s no break in the brilliant spring sunshine spilling over Baltimore and the rallies outside City Hall, in many ways the repercussions of Freddie Gray’s arrest and death have moved indoors.  To the courts. The most important next decisions--for the six police officers charged by the state’s attorney, as well as for hundreds arrested for looting and curfew violations--will be made by judges.  

So we’ve asked two lawyers to help us understand some of the legal questions raised in these cases.  David Rocah, senior staff attorney with the ACLU of Maryland, whose work has included litigation against the state police accused of spying on political activists, is with me in the studio. Joining us by phone is David Gray, professor of criminal law at the University of Maryland.  

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Programs
8:45 am
Mon May 4, 2015

Is This Moment A Youth Moment? We Talk With One Teen

Darius Craig with his family in the Broadway East neighborhood.
Credit Jonna McKone

Last Friday in her press conference on the officers' charges, Marilyn Mosby stated, "to the youth, I will seek justice on your behalf. This is a moment; this is your moment. Let's ensure that we have peaceful and constructive  rallies that will develop structural and systemic changes for generations to come."

That was Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby last Friday, wrapping up her announcement of criminal charges against the police officers involved the arrest of Freddie Gray.

A few hours later, we talked with one of the young people Mosby was calling out to. Darius Craig is a senior at Digital Harbor High School, president of the student government there and the National Honor Society.  He organized a march last Tuesday

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Fri May 1, 2015

Revitalizing West Baltimore, Post-Unrest

Credit Talk Radio News Service / Creative Commons

How will the unrest of the last week affect attempts to redevelop West Baltimore? We ask James Hamlin, a small business owner blocks south from the burned out CVS on North Avenue. Hamlin has run his bakery on Pennsylvania Avenue for years in an effort to revitalize the neighborhood. We also talk with the city’s former development chief Jay Brodie what it takes to persuade businesses to invest in the inner city. 

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