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Maryland Morning with host Tom Hall aired its final broadcast on September 16, 2016. Programs airing from 10/15 - 9/16/16 can be found below.  Tom is now hosting Midday which can be found here.

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Monica Reinagel

The popular reality TV show "The Biggest Loser," has been a hit because audiences love to see those dramatic transformations, as the show's overweight contestants shed as much as 100 pounds in just a few months for a shot at some serious prize money and celebrity. It turns out, however, that those weight-loss victories have been short-lived. 

Goldman Environmental Prize

This morning, we take a look at the successful, multi-year campaign to prevent a massive incinerator from being built in the South Baltimore neighborhood of Curtis Bay, and the young woman who was one of the leaders of that fight.

Destiny Watford was 16 years old when she started organizing against the incinerator that would have been built in her neighborhood and near her school. Destiny, now 20 years old and a student at Towson University, was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize for her tireless campaign against the incinerator. 

Christopher Myers/Baltimore Magazine

In 1955, civil-rights activist Helena Hicks was a student at Morgan State University. When she decided to enter the then-segregated Read’s Drug store in Baltimore with a group of classmates to escape the cold, she had no idea her actions would lead to the desegregation of the drug store chain a few months later. 

Dr. Hicks went on to participate in other protests and sit-ins, including a protest at the once-segregated Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore. 

 Dr. Hicks also comments on the Black Lives Matter movement and what she sees as the most important issue for people of color today.  Portions of this conversation aired originally on Jan 18, 2016. 

Photo by Joshua McKerrow

Every Monday,  theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck graces the Maryland Morning studio with her reviews of the most noteworthy stage productions in Baltimore and across Maryland.  This morning, she's come with news of a funny and high-spirited production by the Annapolis Shakespeare Company of a three-decades old classic, The Complete Worlds of Shakespeare (Abridged)

The rotating three-actor cast manages to embrace all of the Bard's 37-plays in a hilarious, 90-minute roller-coaster ride of skits, written by Adam Long, Daniel Singer and Jess Winfield and directed by ASC's Artistic Director, Sally Boyett.  The fast-paced show sends up the Bard's most famous tragedies, comedies, histories and everything in between, and spotlights the talents of both Mr. Shakespeare and the Annapolis troupe.

ASC presents "The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged)" in the outdoor Courtyard at Reynolds Tavern, every Tuesday evening, now through September 27th. 

MacArthur Foundation

MacArthur Award-winning dancer and choreographer Liz Lerman is the author of Hiking the Horizontal: Field Notes from a Choreographer and founder of the Dance Exchange

Lerman is also the creator of the Critical Response Process, a system of feedback that is designed to make artists want to go back and work. She’s dedicated her career to challenging notions of who can be a dancer and what dance can mean. 

Lerman left Baltimore to accept an appointment as a Professor in the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts at Arizona State University. Liz Lerman joins Tom in-studio to discuss her work as an artist and her new job at Arizona State University. She also explains why she believes that much of the public response to last year's Uprising has been misguided.  This conversation originally aired on June 17, 2016. 

Baltimore School for the Arts

Donald Hicken -- one of the most admired figures in the Baltimore theater community -- retired in June after a 36-year career heading the Theater Department at the Baltimore School for the Arts.  

He helped plan the school back in the late 1970s, and in the years since, as the school has gained national renown, he’s worked to inspire and cultivate countless young talents. Some of his most well-known students include Jada Pinkett-Smith, Tupac Shakur, Tracie Thoms, and Josh Charles.  But for generations of School for the Arts graduates who landed in careers that didn’t put their names in lights, the experience of studying with Donald Hicken still shines brightly. 

Donald Hicken joins Tom in the studio to reflect on his nearly four decades at the BSFA, and on the creative new projects that lie ahead.

Don Hicken is directing a production of "Wait Until Dark” at the Everyman Theatre. That show begins September 7th and runs through October 9th.

Sharayna Christmas

In July,  14 African-American young people from Baltimore traveled to Havana, Cuba to study dance, Spanish and history. The trip was coordinated by Muse 360 and The African Diaspora Alliance.  According to a study by the Institute of International Education, only five percent of study abroad students are African-American at the college level, for high school students the numbers are even lower.  

To prepare for the two-week excursion students took classes and workshops to facilitate conversations about complex issues like systemic racism, health disparities, and manifestations of self-hate within communities of color. The program is designed to expose students to the world outside of Baltimore City while connecting them with the larger African Diaspora. 

One Year Later: Voices of the Uprising

Aug 24, 2016
Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun

To mark the first anniversary of the funeral of Freddie Gray and the protests and street violence that followed, freelance reporter Mary Wiltenburg produced an audio montage of that tumultuous day and its aftermath.  The narrative surrounding the Baltimore Uprising is still a work in progress.

It's time now for another installment in our monthly series, Living Questions, in which we examine the role of religion in the public sphere. We’re producing this series in partnership with the Institute for Islamic Christian and Jewish Studies (ICJS).

In February, ICJS inaugurated a three-part lecture series on the theme of Imagining Justice in Baltimore. A Christian, Jewish and Muslim scholar each addressed the question of how each religious tradition refracts and understands the notion of justice. In light of the wrenching events in Baltimore last spring, the Institute is hoping to bridge ethnic, socio-economic and religious divides, and deepen and enrich appreciation for the place of justice-seeking in different faith traditions. 

Gary Young Photography

Award winning bass clarinetist Todd Marcus is teamed up with legendary clarinetist Don Byron for a one-night only show at Caton Castle in Baltimore.

In addition to being one of the only prominent bass clarinetists on the modern jazz scene, Todd runs the Baltimore based non-profit Intersection of Change. The organization addresses poverty related issues in Sandtown-Winchester and runs an art program to provide children with positive outlets. 

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