The Morning Economic Report | WYPR

The Morning Economic Report

Monday-Friday at 7:33 am

Anirban Basu, Chariman Chief Executive Officer of Sage Policy Group (SPG), is one of the Mid-Atlantic region's leading economic consultants.  Prior to founding SPG he was Chairman and CEO of Optimal Solutions Group, a company he co-founded and which continues to operate. Anirban has also served as Director of Applied Economics and Senior Economist for RESI, where he used his extensive knowledge of the Mid-Atlantic region to support numerous clients in their strategic decision-making processes.  Clients have included the Maryland Department of Transportation, St. Paul Companies, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Players Committee and the Martin O'Malley mayoral campaign.

He is the author of numerous regional publications including the Mid-Atlantic Economic Quarterly and Outlook Maryland. Anirban completed his graduate work in mathematical economics at the University of Maryland.  He earned a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University in 1992.  His Bachelors in Foreign Service is from Georgetown University and was earned in 1990.

The number of studies pertaining to the potential impacts of global warming continues to expand.  Many focus on damage to property or to key industries like agriculture and tourism.  But the impacts go well beyond that. 

Have you noticed that millennials tend to dress differently than the rest of us?  When many of us were growing up, we would wear one set of clothes for work or school, and then change into exercise gear at the gym.  Millennials seem to wear gym clothes all the time whether in the form of running tights or yoga pants.  They have embraced what’s called athleisure fashion. 

A chart developed by Branko Milanovic, an economics professor at the City University of New York, has been nicknamed the elephant chart because of its elephantine shape.  The chart includes a big hump indicating rising incomes for middle classes in China and India, but goes on to show declining incomes for the lower middle class in advanced nations like the United States. 

We drove a lot this summer.  Americans fueled up with gasoline at levels not seen since the onset of the recession nearly nine years ago.  New data from U.S. Energy Information Administration indicate that Americans purchased approximately four hundred and six million gallons of gasoline per day on average in June.  

According to the U.S. Labor Department’s job opportunities and labor turnover survey, also known as the Jolts survey, the number of job openings in America climbed to a new record of five point nine million at the end of July. 

Uber v. Taxi - 9/21/16

Sep 28, 2016

Imagine you are a taxi cab driver.  One of your goals is to have a paying passenger in your car as often as possible.  If you spend all of your time by yourself, you won’t make any money and may sustain a lot of cost driving around looking for fares. 

It wouldn’t be hard to find an economist who believes that the average American is a bit too grumpy with respect to the U.S. labor market.  After all, the U.S. labor market is enjoying its longest string of monthly job gains in the nation’s history. 

When Ross Perot ran for the presidency in nineteen ninety two, he warned of a giant sucking sound that would be generated by the flow of American jobs to Mexico via free trade.  Questions about the benefits and costs of free trade have certainly been a focal point of the twenty sixteen election. 

Many families would love to take a vacation.  Finances often get in the way.  The cost of airfare can be dear along with lodging, food and other expenses.  The issue often comes down to the fact that airfares need to be paid upfront, and many families simply don’t have that much liquidity. 

Census Bureau estimates of household income in twenty fourteen indicate that the typical American family earned a bit less than fifty three thousand seven hundred dollars that year.  When adjusted for inflation, that figure is about thirty seven hundred dollars less than it was in two thousand and seven and more than four thousand dollars less than in two thousand. 

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