The Morning Economic Report | WYPR

The Morning Economic Report

Monday-Friday at 7:33 am

Anirban Basu, Chairman Chief Executive Officer of Sage Policy Group (SPG), is one of the Mid-Atlantic region's leading economic consultants.  Prior to founding SPG he was Chairman and CEO of Optimal Solutions Group, a company he co-founded and which continues to operate. Anirban has also served as Director of Applied Economics and Senior Economist for RESI, where he used his extensive knowledge of the Mid-Atlantic region to support numerous clients in their strategic decision-making processes.  Clients have included the Maryland Department of Transportation, St. Paul Companies, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Players Committee and the Martin O'Malley mayoral campaign.

He is the author of numerous regional publications including the Mid-Atlantic Economic Quarterly and Outlook Maryland. Anirban completed his graduate work in mathematical economics at the University of Maryland.  He earned a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University in 1992.  His Bachelors in Foreign Service is from Georgetown University and was earned in 1990.

redspotted/flickr

Click on the image for The Morning Economic Reports for the week of September 18.

Aranami/flickr

Click on the image for The MERs for the week of September 11.

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

Click on the image for The MERs for the week of September 4.

jeremy sternberg/flickr

Starting with this week's episode, The Morning Economic Report will be presented in one podcast. 

Click on the image for The MERs for the week of August 28.

Click on the image for The Morning Economic Reports for the week of August 21.

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

Click on the picture for The Morning Economic Reports for the week of August 14. 

redspotted/flickr

Click on the image for the reports from the week of August 7.

elycefeliz/flickr

Click on the image for the MERs for the week of July 31.

Rene Schwietzke/flickr

Click on the image for the MERs for the week of July 24. 

Kathryn Decker/flickr

Click on the image for the Morning Economic Reports from the week of July 17.

frankieleon/flickr

Click on the image for the Morning Economic Reports from the week of July 10.

Click on the image for the Morning Economic Reports from the week of July 3.

elycefeliz/flickr

Click on the image for the Morning Economic Reports from the week of June 30.

Shrinking Homes

Jun 22, 2017

Newly constructed homes shrunk in terms of average size last year for the first time since the end of the recession. According to recently released Census Bureau data, the median size of a new single-family home fell 2 percent to 2,422 square feet in 2016. 

Anirban has more. 


Jason Rosenberg/flickr

The lack of college affordability continues to be a growing problem across the nation. According to data from the College Board, the average cost of tuition of an in-state student at a public university was more than $9600 for the 2016/2017 school year, up 2.4 percent for the year.  

Anirban has more. 


Job Creation

Jun 21, 2017
Kathryn Decker/flickr

Last month, unemployment sank to just 4.3 percent, its lowest level in 16 years. That sounds like good news, but the unemployment rate largely dipped for the wrong reasons. The nation added 138,000 jobs in May according to the government’s preliminary estimate, but that was a disappointing tally.  


Pollution

Jun 20, 2017
Ionescu Iulian/flickr

The global environment has been in the news a lot lately. You may have heard it said that among the world’s greatest polluters are China and India, the world’s two most populous nations and also among its most rapidly growing economically. The International Monetary Fund predicts that China’s economy will expand 6.6 percent this year and that India’s will expand by more than 7 percent.  


Aging Vehicles

Jun 19, 2017

According to an IHS Markit study, the average age of vehicles on American roads is now a record 11.6 years.  There are many reasons for this, including the higher quality of new vehicles. As pointed out by an analyst at Kelley Blue Book, many people are "basically driving around in a rotary phone close."

Rene Schwietzke/flickr

Next time you go to the mall, you should probably give it a big hug and wish it luck. A new report from Credit Suisse predicts that between 20 and 25 percent of American malls will close within five years. As reported by CNNMoney, that level of dislocation would be unprecedented in the nation’s history.  

Anirban has more. 


Aranami/flickr

The U.S. economy remains the largest in the world and consumer spending supports two-thirds of all activity. You might remember that after the 9/11 attacks, consumers were urged to come to the economy’s rescue by spending more aggressively. And as pointed out by a recent Barron’s article, these ought to be boom times for U.S.consumers. 


Karine Clessia/flickr

Remember when we used phones primarily to make phone calls. Now we text, tweet, Snap, bank, shop, order food and transportation on our devices. We also play a lot of games. For the first time ever, revenue from computer games exceeded $100 billion globally in a single year. The gamer capital of the world is China, which has overtaken the U.S. in terms of market size.

Tom Blackwell/flickr

It is well known that less educated workers tend to make less money than those with more education.  Recent data indicate that that’s hardly where the differences end. The Federal Reserve Bank’s latest Survey of Household Economics and Decision making, a treasure trove of workforce data derived from the survey responses of more than 600 respondents, indicates that less educated workers also suffer irregular, unpredictable work schedules. 

Rising Wages

Jun 12, 2017
elycefeliz/flickr

Economists have been debating one of the economy’s central mysteries for months – with unemployment rates so low, why are wages rising barely faster than the pace of inflation.  As workers become more difficult to recruit, the notion is that compensation should be bid higher, but that isn’t happening at the pace one might expect... 

There was a time after last year’s elections that many experts were predicting a sharp bounce in economic growth in the U.S. As indicated by writer Nelson Schwartz, that sharp bounce is beginning to look more like a small bump. It is not that the economy is necessarily weakening or that a recession is imminent. Rather, it appears that the pace of growth this year won’t be much more than it was last year or the year before that.  

Anirban has more. 


Ricardo/flickr

While there has been a considerable volume of discussion recently regarding the curtailment of immigration in America, recent data indicate that through 2016, the foreign born share of the labor force continued to expand. According to U.S. Labor Department data, last year, there were 27 million foreign born people in the U.S. Labor Force. That translates into nearly 17 percent of the workforce. 

Anirban has more.

Rural Poverty

Jun 7, 2017
cisc1970/flickr

When people consider the presence concentrations of poverty in America, they may envision the conditions frequently associated with inner cities. Indeed, beginning at some point during the 1980s, the nation’s most challenging communities were often found in cities, where a combination of crime and suburban flight rendered large cities less economically vibrant.

Anirban has more. 


Ricardo/flickr

Despite forecasts suggesting that 2017 would be better for the global economy than 2016, economic growth during 2017’s initial quarter in developed economies slowed sharply. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development recently indicated that the combined economic output of its 35 members expanded just 0.4 percent during the first quarter.  

Anirban has more. 


Better Bridges

Jun 5, 2017
melissaclark/flickr

One of our standard national narratives is that America’s infrastructure is collapsing. Our pipes leak, our water is polluted, our bridges obsolete, and our airports prehistoric. What is less often heard are some of the improvements being made to infrastructure. For instance, as indicated by writer David Harrison, America’s bridges are actually getting sounder.  

Anirban has more.


Kathryn Decker/flickr

The job market has steadily improved for college graduates in recent years. Unfortunately, the cities that tend to offer the most employment opportunities for recent graduates are also typically the most expensive. A recently released report from Trulia estimates the share of apartment listings that would take up less than 30 percent of the typical millennial’s paycheck in major U.S. cities. 


Auto Loan Debt

Jun 1, 2017
John Loo/flickr

There are a lot of new cars out there, which also means that there are a lot of people who now have a car loan. According to recently released data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, a record $107 million Americans have auto loan debt. Much of this debt is of recent origin. In early 2012, only 80 million Americans had car loans. As indicated by CNNMoney, back then, more Americans had home mortgages that auto loans. 


Pages