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The Morning Economic Report

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Anirban Basu, Chairman Chief Executive Officer of Sage Policy Group (SPG), is one of the Mid-Atlantic region's leading economic consultants.  Prior to founding SPG he was Chairman and CEO of Optimal Solutions Group, a company he co-founded and which continues to operate. Anirban has also served as Director of Applied Economics and Senior Economist for RESI, where he used his extensive knowledge of the Mid-Atlantic region to support numerous clients in their strategic decision-making processes.  Clients have included the Maryland Department of Transportation, St. Paul Companies, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Players Committee and the Martin O'Malley mayoral campaign.

He is the author of numerous regional publications including the Mid-Atlantic Economic Quarterly and Outlook Maryland. Anirban completed his graduate work in mathematical economics at the University of Maryland.  He earned a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University in 1992.  His Bachelors in Foreign Service is from Georgetown University and was earned in 1990.

WalrusWaltz/flickr

There has been considerable discussion in recent months about the role of immigrants in American society.  Some of this discussion may have made people wonder if the U.S. is as open to people from other parts of the world as it once was. Apparently, many people, including students, have come to the conclusion that America has, at least for now, become a less desirable destination.

Anirban has more. 


Tax Incentives

Mar 28, 2017
Jonas Bengtsson/flickr

With so much emphasis being placed on the need to accelerate job creation and economic growth, communities across the country are offering companies rich incentives to expand operations or to relocate.  As reported by The Wall Street Journal, economic development tax incentives have more than tripled over the past twenty-five years, offsetting about thirty percent of the taxes the companies receiving incentives would otherwise be paying.

Anirban has more. 


futureatlas/flickr

There was a time when the housing market could be characterized as a buyer’s market.  Several years ago, the inventory of unsold homes was elevated.  Many families found that they could no longer qualify for a mortgage.  The result was that buyers in the market had plenty of choice and negotiating power vis-à-vis sellers.  That is no longer the case.  

Anirban has more. 


charlie holzhausen

There are a lot of Baby Boomers and members of Generation X who like to complain about Millennials – who represent the youngest members of the U.S. workforce. Those of us from older generations complain about their seemingly insatiable appetite for flex time and for positive feedback regardless of the quality of their work. They also don’t seem to cherish the things that we cherished, like television. 

Anirban has more on this story.


Aranami/flickr

Economic data has been pretty upbeat since last year’s presidential election. There is evidence of stepped up business investment, more rapid hiring, and more confidence among investors. In response, many economists have raised their forecasts for near-term economic growth and inflation.  

Anirban has more. 


Oscar Ucho/flickr

Economists are ubiquitous in the world of public policy. As pointed out by writer Neil Irwin, walk half a block in downtown Washington, for instance, and there is a good chance you will pass an economist. Turn on cable news, and you will find an abundance of economists, often ones who serve a chief economist function for some organization of note.  

Anirban has more. 


James Tipton/flickr

One of the emerging mysteries in the U.S. macroeconomy is the growing gap between the number of workers losing their jobs and the number applying for unemployment benefits. One would expect these things to move together. When one loses a job, it is perfectly natural for them to seek out unemployment benefits to bolster their spending power until they are able to secure replacement employment.

Anirban has more on this story.

The Best Paying Jobs

Mar 20, 2017
apox apox/flickr

Money isn’t everything, and yet people often rank job quality based on how much the typical person makes in a given occupational category. Career website Glassdoor recently ranked the 25 best paying jobs in America.  The Glassdoor report is based on an analysis of salaries Glassdoor users entered on the site during the one year period ending in February 2017. 

Anirban has more on the best paid positions. 


For many young people, it’s time for spring break – so the last thing one should talk about is bad grades. But that’s precisely what U.S. infrastructure received during the most recent assessment supplied by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Every four years, the Society publishes an analysis regarding the capabilities of American infrastructure, including the nation’s seaports, airports, water systems and roads. American infrastructure received a grade of D+, unchanged from its last report card delivered in 2013.  

Here's more from Anirban.


liz west/flickr

American wealth is on the rise. Thanks primarily to a surging stock market during the final quarter of 2016, aggregate household wealth increased 2.3 percent to end at nearly $93 trillion. The value of household stock and mutual fund portfolios leapt by more than $700 billion during the fourth quarter. The value of homes rose by roughly another $560 billion.  

Anirban has more. 

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