The Morning Economic Report | WYPR

The Morning Economic Report

Monday-Friday at 7:33 am

Anirban Basu, Chairman Chief Executive Officer of Sage Policy Group (SPG), is one of the Mid-Atlantic region's leading economic consultants.  Prior to founding SPG he was Chairman and CEO of Optimal Solutions Group, a company he co-founded and which continues to operate. Anirban has also served as Director of Applied Economics and Senior Economist for RESI, where he used his extensive knowledge of the Mid-Atlantic region to support numerous clients in their strategic decision-making processes.  Clients have included the Maryland Department of Transportation, St. Paul Companies, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Players Committee and the Martin O'Malley mayoral campaign.

He is the author of numerous regional publications including the Mid-Atlantic Economic Quarterly and Outlook Maryland. Anirban completed his graduate work in mathematical economics at the University of Maryland.  He earned a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University in 1992.  His Bachelors in Foreign Service is from Georgetown University and was earned in 1990.

Healthcare Spending

Mar 7, 2017
RyanWhiteHealth/flickr

For years, various agencies have been striving to reduce America’s health-related expenditures. Despite those efforts, a recent report from nonpartisan experts at Health and Human Services concludes that healthcare spending will continue to claim an expanding share of national resources for the foreseeable future – and that’s regardless of what the new president and congress do with the Affordable Care Act. 

Anirban has more of the story. 


David J/flickr

If people expect an economy to expand slowly, then that economy is likely to expand slowly. In other words, expectations are likely to become self-fulfilling prophecy. This is the conclusion of a new paper authored by three economists. As reported by The Wall Street Journal, the economists, including Olivier Blanchard from the Peterson Institute for International Economics, generate key insights relative to productivity.

Anirban has more of the story. 


amy gizienski/flickr

Let’s face it – living near your parents isn’t altogether fashionable. Often, the people who we consider as among the most successful are those who moved far away, perhaps to exotic locales like Singapore or Sydney or to American commercial centers like Wall Street or Silicon Valley. But recent research indicates that sometimes it’s best to stay close to mommy and daddy.  

Anirban has more of the story. 


Sean MacEntee/flickr

There are plenty of items that are becoming more expensive, whether healthcare, apartments, gasoline, or homes. But occasionally, one will come across a product or service category in which prices are falling.  Air travel is perhaps poised to be one of those categories.  

Anirban has more of this story.


When the price of gasoline or food goes up, we usually view that as bad. If the prices of goods and services rise too rapidly, it is expected that the Federal Reserve will clamp down on money supply to keep inflation in check. But when the price of homes rises, that’s often discussed in the context of economic improvement. 

Anirban has more on this story. 


Inflation

Feb 28, 2017
Jon Welsh/flickr

Inflation is beginning to emerge. The prices Americans pay for goods and services surged last month by the largest amount in four years, reflecting in part a rebound in the cost of gasoline.

Anirban has more on this story. 


cjuneau/flickr

In the ongoing debate regarding immigration, one argument put forward for limiting immigration is that reductions in the supply of foreign labor will lead to higher wages among native-born Americans. New research indicates that this equation for improved labor market outcomes isn’t quite so simple. As reported by The Wall Street Journal, a team of economists has analyzed the mid-century Bracero program, which allowed nearly half a million seasonal farm workers per year into the U.S. from Mexico.

GDP

Feb 27, 2017
AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Last year, the U.S. economy expanded just 1.6 percent in terms of gross domestic product or GDP. 2016 will go down as yet another year of tepid growth. But there are a growing number of economists who are expressing skepticism about the accuracy of the GDP measure.

Karen/flickr

When many of us were growing up, it was quite customary for someone to be on strike. Over time, the strike or work stoppage has become a rarely used instrument for labor unions to extract better treatment from employers or higher levels of compensation. According to data recently made available by the U.S. Labor Department, fewer major work stoppages occurred over the past ten years than occurred each year from 1947 to 1981.

Jo Sau/flickr

There has certainly been much concern expressed about the declining economic circumstances of American men in recent decades. But American men are hardly alone in facing adversity. The Resolution Foundation, a British think tank, has published new research indicating that British men born between 1981 and 2000 will earn $12,500 pounds less in their twenties than Generation X men.

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