The Nature of Things

Tuesday at 4:44 pm

The Nature of Things is a weekly broadcast about our area’s native flora and fauna, hosted by Irvine Nature Center’s Executive Director Brooks Paternotte.  At the start of each week, The Nature of Things offers an eco-friendly perspective on everything from our changing seasons to the sounds of our migrating birds to the plants invading our yards, fields and forests.

Tune in to 88.1 WYPR every Tuesday at 4:44 pm. as Brooks inspires us all to explore, respect and protect nature.

Nutria

Jul 12, 2016
Henri Sivonen/Flickr Creative Commons

With the exception of my kids after those messy, artificially flavored orange popsicles, there’s only one animal I can think of that has orange teeth. While some people might be turned off by this critter’s hairless, rat-like tail, it’s actually the teeth that stick with me.

The hooked, stubby, Tang-colored fangs protrude forward prominently. They are long, sharp and perfect for eating marsh plants.

And they belong to an animal called the nutria.

Cowbirds

Jul 5, 2016
Rodney Campbell/Flickr Creative Commons

Last month, a friend of mine posted a photo of a local bird's nest onto Facebook. The caption read, "one of these things is not like the other," and the image featured 4 robin's-egg blue eggs alongside one larger white egg with cocoa-colored speckles.

“Not like the other,” indeed.

The outlier belonged to the brown-headed cowbird, a smallish, stocky blackbird with a fascinating approach to raising its young. Cowbirds are our area’s most common brood parasites, meaning that they make no nest of their own and instead lay eggs in the nests of other avian species.

Lightning Bugs

Jun 28, 2016
Terry Priest/Flickr Creative Commons

As a child, the first time I saw a firefly was magical. I distinctly remember the way its seemingly weightless body felt after I captured it in my hands. And the way it revealed itself with a yellowish green light like a tiny firework. Then, just as quickly, disappeared into the summer’s evening skies.

Peter Miller/Flickr Creative Commons

Butterflies of all kinds can be found flitting across our listening area’s woods, fields, yards and gardens. In fact, Maryland has more than 150 species of these winged wonders. Brooks wits down with Laura Soder, Irvine’s coordinator of its native Butterfly House, to chat about butterflies

Box Turtles

Jun 7, 2016
Michael Mulqueen/Flickr Creative Commons

Driving on a quiet back road this Sunday, I rounded a slight curve and hit the brakes. In the middle of the road was a ball-cap-sized animal stranded near the double yellow line. I knew immediately it was a turtle in need.

Glenn Euloth/Flickr Creative Commons

One of the most popular questions I overhear at Irvine’s comes from every age group. Our Nature Preschoolers ask it. High school-aged visitors on field trips ask it. Moms and dads coming in to hike the trails ask it. And then right on their heels, seniors from our area garden clubs ask it too.

What’s the difference between frogs and toads?

Mantids

May 24, 2016
Jason Bolonski/Flickr Creative Commons

Last June, my son Jack and I were wandering through the fields behind our home, when Jack came bolting toward me with his latest nature find.

Atop his finger was a tiny, green, kneeling insect peering at me through large eyes on its triangular head. Its miniscule, yet still prominent, front legs were held together at an angle that nearly looked like they were in reverence to some greater power. I knew immediately what it was: a juvenile praying mantis.

Loblolly Pines

May 17, 2016
Ildar Sagdejev

This time of year, I love kayaking through the calm waters of Maryland’s tidal rivers and wetlands. There’s something special about our Chesapeake Bay’s blue-green inlets, briny air and abundant wildlife that make me feel like I’m home. But there’s something else I love to see while I’m paddling too: the view of hundreds of towering loblolly pine trees.

Lady Beetles

May 10, 2016
John Flannery/Flickr Creative Commons

Over the weekend, I was in my garden and saw one of nature’s own pest controllers. It was my first ladybug of the season and I was really lucky, as it was a native species, called a ‘convergent’ ladybug. The tiny, beautiful insect was an orangey-red half-sphere with 13 bold black spots and had its trademark stubby legs and roving antennae.

Ticks

May 3, 2016
Peter Dickson/Flickr Creative Commons

There may be no bug creepier than a tick.

These sesame-seed-sized parasites crawl slowly and silently up our bodies, surround their mouth-parts in our skin, and then casually slurp their fill of our blood until their bodies expand like tiny water balloons.

So as you carefully pluck a tick from your skin, you may undoubtedly wonder: what purpose could they possibly serve? What good are ticks, exactly?

Pages